Rory Culkin

Rory Culkin

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This Is Our Youth Opening Night Departures

Guest and Rory Culkin - Opening night of This Is Our Youth at the Cort Theatre - Departures. - New York, New York, United States - Friday 12th September 2014

Rory Culkin
Rory Culkin

Tribeca Film Festival 2014

Rory Culkin - Tribeca Film Festival 2014 presents the world premiere of 'Gabriel' at the SVA Theatre - Arrivals - New York, United States - Thursday 17th April 2014

Rory Culkin
Rory Culkin
Rory Culkin
Rory Culkin
Rory Culkin

8th Annual Paper Nightlife Awards presented by Hennessy, held at Webster Hall

Rory Culkin Wednesday 10th October 2012 8th Annual Paper Nightlife Awards presented by Hennessy, held at Webster Hall

Electrick Children Review


OK
Slow and introspective, this involving drama wobbles slightly as its plot takes a few contrived turns. But the performances are excellent, and the filmmaking is mesmerising. And it's exploring some themes that are rarely addressed so boldly on-screen.

Raised in an cloistered religious community in Utah, Rachel (Garner) has just turned 15 and believes that she's pregnant because she listened to some illicit pop music. Her parents (Watros and Zane) think otherwise, blaming her brother Will (Aiken) for this "immaculate" conception. But instead of face an arranged marriage to a stranger, Rachel runs off with Will to Las Vegas. There they meet Clyde (Culkin), a young rocker who challenges everything they've been taught and changes the way they see the world.

Continue reading: Electrick Children Review

Hick Trailer


A young girl, Luli, from a small town hitchhikes to Vegas with her father's pistol in an attempt to escape the abuse from her alcoholic parents. On the way, Luli meets Eddie - an unhinged man in a Stetson with dubious intentions - and Glenda, a red-headed druggie on the run. With the simple plan of finding a "sugar daddy", Luli gets into much more hostile situations than she bargained for.

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NYLON Magazine annual May Young Hollywood issue party held at Bardot Hollywood - Arrivals

Rory Culkin Wednesday 4th May 2011 NYLON Magazine annual May Young Hollywood issue party held at Bardot Hollywood - Arrivals Hollywood, California

Scream 4 Review


Good
More than a decade after Scream 3, Craven and company reteam for another knowing thriller about scary movies. And by both following and subverting the rules of a reboot, they make a film that's both frightening and hilarious.

On the 10th anniversary of the original killings, Sidney (Campbell) returns to Woodsboro, having put the darkness behind her. Although the Stab movies based on her experience have reached number 7. Then a new spree of grisliness starts, and Sheriff Dewey (Arquette) and his journalist wife Gale (Cox) are on the case. Meanwhile, Sidney's cousin Jill (Roberts) and her pals (Pannettiere and Jaffe) are both fascinated and terrified by what's happening. So are the school's movie geeks (Knudsen and Culkin) and Jill's ex (Tortorella).

Continue reading: Scream 4 Review

Lymelife Review


OK
Offbeat and funny but thoroughly realistic, this period drama explores issues of family, youth and social pressure through the eyes of a 15-year-old who's just starting to realise that people perhaps are more complicated than he ever imagined.

Scott (Rory Culkin) is a teen in 1980 Long Island, where his parents (Baldwin and Hennessy) are planning to build a new house while his meathead big brother (Keiran Culkin) is just back from basic training. He has a crush on his neighbour Adriana (Roberts), whose mother (Nixon) is failing to cope with the fact that her husband (Hutton) has Lyme disease. Both families are struggling with social mobility, marital stress and the tensions of the time they live in.

Not to mention some very bad decisions they make.

Continue reading: Lymelife Review

Lymelife Review


Excellent
In Lymelife, Cynthia Nixon, as real estate agent Melissa Bragg in a New York suburb in 1979, looks skinny and a shade skanky, like an aging out-of-town version of a T. Rex groupie. And yet here she is in the real estate office trying to sell parcels in a housing development to people with from other countries. "It's the American Dream, Mr. Patel. On Long Island." Her boss, Mickey Bartlett (Alec Baldwin, he of the reptilian gaze and surface-to-air anger), is planning to become a millionaire in one year developing new homes in a place he calls Bartletown (what else?). And since they are next-door neighbors, the two are not so secretly engaged in schtupping one another. Mickey's wife Brenda (Jill Hennessy) is trying to tune him out but the song is getting monotonous. Melissa's husband Charlie (Timothy Hutton), spends his time in cheap gray bargain suits, sweating profusely and lurking in the basement, imaging that deer are trying to psychically commune with him. Charlie is slowly slipping away (possibly) to the effects of Lyme disease. Or he may just be another strung out sixties reject (he says the Lyme disease feels like "perpetual acid trip").

Lyme disease in the Long Island burb is the horror malady of the moment, as constructing new homes smack dab in the middle of the woods may be beautiful but it is also nightmarish. Radio announcers point out that Lyme disease causes psychiatric disturbances and severe mental disorders. Mothers weep at the thought of their kids contracting it and duct-tape the kiddies' clothing together to keep out the ticks. But if Lyme disease is the rampant contagion that all fear, it must have seeped into the residents' skulls and infected their brains. Because the only sensible parental character in Lymelife is Charlie, and he is obviously nuts.

Continue reading: Lymelife Review

Launch party for the 14th Annual Gen Art Film Festival at 7 For All Mankind

Rory Culkin Wednesday 25th March 2009 Launch party for the 14th Annual Gen Art Film Festival at 7 For All Mankind New York City, USA

Rory Culkin

The Night Listener Review


Weak
I'm going to give Robin Williams the benefit of the doubt and assume that he is so detached and distant in The Night Listener because it's how his character goes through life, not because, if he's not wrestling wildlife in a tacky Winnebago, the actor has no clue what to do with his face.

I will also assume that the episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent I saw ages ago with this same story - only much juicier, with extortion and murder in that one - was inspired by the same source material, rather than the film being a watered-down version of a crime show franchise.

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Down In The Valley Review


OK

Harlan Carruthers is a blissful cowboy, all scuffed boots, aw-shucks mannerisms, and a negligent sort of sensuality. He's lightening-quick with his twin single-shot Colts and loves nothing more than riding his horse to the highest hill around and surveying the beauty of the landscape.

He's also a walking anachronism, because Down in the Valley is a modern-day tale, and the title refers to the overbuilt suburbia that is the San Fernando Valley, the land of crowded freeways and chain stores that marks the northern reaches of Los Angeles. But Harlan, played by Edward Norton, swaggers through, contentedly out of place, until he catches sight of Tobe (Evan Rachel Wood), a teenage nymph who pulls into the service station where Harlan works as she is on the way to the beach with her giggling friends. It's unclear why the group dismisses Harlan as out-of-place instead of in fashion, but Tobe is as instantly taken with him as he is with her, and he quits his job to catch his first sight of the ocean with her.

Continue reading: Down In The Valley Review

The Chumscrubber Review


Terrible
The starry-eyed cross-breed of American Beauty and Donnie Darko, here comes The Chumscrubber, another self-righteous satire on self-absorbed parents and their estranged offspring. With the over-extended reach of a callow teenager, it fails to conquer its peaks of social relevancy. But it does have a titular headless video-game anti-hero, who, like the film's residents, uses his head as a weapon and presides over the film like a post-apocalyptic master-of-ceremonies.

A facetious voice-over -- "This was the best of all possible worlds" -- introduces brooding loner Dean Stiffle (Jamie Bell of Billy Elliot), a teen caught between dueling self-helper parents, who's soon to discover his dead friend Troy (Josh Janowicz) behind the house of his party-throwing mother, Carrie (Glenn Close). Weeks later, Dean's best-selling psychiatrist-author father, Bill (William Fichtner), therapy-talks Dean sick about his lack of grief. Dad's cure: More of the same pharmaceuticals Dean's school's already drowning in.

Continue reading: The Chumscrubber Review

It Runs in the Family (2003) Review


OK
Someone once said of nepotism, "It does a family good." And occasionally, it does a movie good, as well. It Runs in the Family might not have worked so well with, say, Martin and Charlie Sheen, or Tom and Colin Hanks. But with three generations of Douglas actors on hand, the sentimental yet familiar family affair coasts along smoothly and generates enough heat to warm the heart.

The Grombergs are typical urban dwellers who confront extramatal temptations, medical dilemmas and general household turmoil on a daily basis. Alex (Michael Douglas) and his wife, Rebecca (Bernadette Peters), hardly have time for each other, let alone for their two children (Cameron Douglas, Rory Culkin) and Alex's parents (Kirk and Diana Douglas). Though largely independent, the group learns to lean on each other to pull through a sees of emotional challenges.

Continue reading: It Runs in the Family (2003) Review

You Can Count on Me Review


Excellent
You Can Count on Me is a film that, in true Sundance form, mixes the familiar with the unexpected. The Best Dramatic Film winner from this year's festival has some actors we've seen before (including Matthew Broderick) and some traditional storylines (single Mom's troubles, loner returns to hometown), but first-time writer-director Ken Lonergan adds just enough unpredictable dialogue and creativity to make this movie the real deal.

The single Mom is Sammy (Laura Linney), an organized bank loan officer living in her small-town childhood home. The loner is her scraggly brother Terry (Mark Ruffalo), a troubled wanderer coming back to ask Sammy for cash. And while this seems pretty basic from the outset, Lonergan has some smart ideas up his sleeve.

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Rory Culkin

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