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Beyond The Reach Review

Good

With a spectacular setting and two solid actors on-screen, this thriller builds enough solid suspense to distract the audience from the implausible premise. Frankly, the screenwriter might have got away with it if he had avoided the temptation to indulge in some wacky bunny-boiler plotting. But Michael Douglas and Jeremy Irvine throw themselves into the situation in a way that's both gripping and entertaining.

In rural New Mexico, local orphan Ben (Irvine) has found happiness with his girlfriend Laina (Hanna Mangan Lawrence). Then she heads to Denver for university, so he throws himself into his job as a tracker working with the local small-town sheriff (Ronny Cox). His next job is to escort the cocky billionaire John (Douglas) out to the reach to hunt bighorn. But once the two men are in the wilderness, an unexpected incident reveals John's willingness to ignore the law. And now he needs to silence Ben. So John sends Ben into the desert wearing just his underpants, following him to make sure he dies unsuspiciously in the cruel sunshine. But he of course underestimates Ben's experience and resourcefulness.

The cat-and-mouse story holds the interest due to the actors, because it's never remotely believable that John's fancy jeep could keep up with the fleet-footed Ben through all of these rock-strewn mountains and ravines. And there's never even the slightest explanation for John's sudden burst of sadism. But never mind, Douglas sells the character through sheer charisma, swaggering across the Wild West like a man who has never lost at anything and doesn't intend to now. Meanwhile, Irvine throws himself into a physically demanding role that has some surprising emotional resonance. His moral dilemma is palpable, as his integrity wobbles in the face of a fistful of cash. Together, they make a terrific odd couple, with their constant distrusting glances and bald-faced bravado.

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Beyond The Reach - Featurette


The cast and crew of forthcoming thriller 'Beyond The Reach' including producer Robert Mitas, director Jean Baptiste Leonetti, and stars Jeremy Irvine and Michael Douglas, discuss the making of the movie in a new featurette. Everyone had a lot of praise for the two leading actors.

Continue: Beyond The Reach - Featurette

Beyond The Reach Trailer


Deserts are inhospitable places at the best of times. For one young man, things are about to become a whole lot worse. Ben (Jeremy Irvine) has been living on the edge of civilisation for years, helping to lead trappers and hunters safely through the desert to experience some of the most wild and dangerous hunting on the planet. When he is employed by Madec (Michael Douglas), a wealthy business man who has a taste for hunting, he drives out beyond an area known as The Reach. During their hunting, Madec shoots at a target, obscured by the sun's glare, which later turns out to have been a person. With his business at stake if the world discovers what he has done, Madec decides to leave no witnesses, and opts to let the desert kill Ben. Ben, however, has other ideas.

Continue: Beyond The Reach Trailer

Imagine That Review


Weak
Undemanding audiences may warm to the strong cast and crew of this family comedy, even though it's yet another example of a movie that's had all the life sucked out of it by the Hollywood studio system. In the end it isn't very funny, clever or engaging.

Evan (Murphy) is a high-flying financial executive who's not as attentive to his perky daughter Olivia (Shahidi) as he should be. Sharing custody with his ex (Parker), he only barely hears what Olivia says, and is shocked to discover that her imaginary friends are giving sound investment advice. So he starts using their tips at work, which both improves his job prospects and his relationship with Olivia. But this comes undone when his boss (Cox) offers a prime promotion to either him or his smarmy office rival (Church).

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Imagine That Review


Bad
Certain stars clearly don't care about their long-term entertainment legacy. For Robin Williams, Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and especially Eddie Murphy, how they will be remembered artistically is a lot less important than earning that divorce/paternity/lawsuit/greed-induced paycheck. Take the latest from former SNL superstar Murphy -- Imagine That. Aimed directly at the grade school demographic (it's a co-production with Universal affiliate Nickelodeon), this story of a workaholic father who's desperate to find a way to reconnect with his distant daughter isn't particularly awful. It's definitely not Norbit or Daddy Day Care. But within this otherwise formulaic family film are elements so atrocious that they remove any heart Murphy manages to mine.

For Evan Danielson (Murphy), life centers solely on work. As a financial advisor for major companies and clients, he must stay ahead of the competition both outside and within the firm. His chief competition is the newly hired Johnny Whitefeather (Thomas Haden Church). Playing up his Native American connections, the rival undermines Evan's confidence and when their boss Tom Stevens (Ronny Cox) suggests he will be stepping down, the race to replace him is on. Unfortunately, our hero's plans are complicated by the arrival of his daughter Olivia (Yara Shahidi). Still lost in a world of imaginary friends and security blankets, she tries her dad's nerves -- that is, until her fantasy games start accurately predicting fiscal trends. Soon, Evan is desperate for Olivia's help, hoping it will land him the big promotion.

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Ronny Cox Saturday 6th June 2009 Los Angeles Premiere of 'Imagine That' held at the Paramount Theatre - arrivals Hollywood, California, USA

Ronny Cox
Ronny Cox

RoboCop Review


Extraordinary
RoboCop was released in 1987, and it's the sort of film that looks like it was made by somebody who knew America only from what he read in newspapers. Which may be close to the truth; Dutch director Paul Verhoeven had been living in the U.S. for less than a decade when he made this, his first big-budget Hollywood film. The script gleefully takes on every myth told about the U.S. during the Reagan '80s: Cities are dens of evil and full of constant gunplay, authority has been brought to heel by capitalism, technology has crushed our humanity to atoms, the media destroys the morals of children. RoboCop plays all of this out as a bloody farce - it's both funny and violent as hell -- but it also knows that there are kernels of truth in all those statements. Great science fiction sheds light on the real world by recreating it radically, and RoboCop is great science fiction - it's one of the best dystopian fantasies about America put to film.

The place is Detroit, the time sometime in the near future. The part of the city known as "Old Detroit" is a cesspool of grime, slums, and toxic sludge; "New Detroit" is an empty promise of a shining new city that we see only on billboards. The police force is privatized, and one of its officers, Alex J. Murphy (Peter Weller) is grotesquely wounded during a fight with a gang. OCP, the company running the force, has had back luck creating a purely mechanical cop. So it claims Murphy's nearly-dead body and transforms it into a man-machine hybrid that's programmed to perform police work ethically. On his first night on the beat, he stops a rape in progress, shooting the rapist in the crotch and telling the woman in a chill monotone: "You have suffered an emotional shock. I will notify a rape crisis center."

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The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review


Weak
A film that works overtime to offend each and every ethnic group and economic class that makes up the smoggy purgatory of Los Angeles while simultaneously patting itself on the back for being so putatively daring, The L.A. Riot Spectacular is a cynical exercise in erstwhile satire that's all the more frustrating for the wasted opportunity it represents.

Like a series of linked MAD TV skits done without regard to network censors - the humor is about that intelligent - the film presents the 1992 Rodney King beating and subsequent riots as a grand comic opera of greed and stupidity, going after everybody involved with equal vigor. One can get a feel for how writer/director Marc Klasfeld intends to approach his subject a few minutes in, when the car chase and police beating of King (T.K. Carter) is done as a jokey game, with a police helicopter pilot serving as the announcer ("and they're off!"), while the cops themselves, having pulled King over, place beats over the ethnicity of the guy inside. Then Snoop Dogg shows up - serving, appropriately enough, as the film's narrator and chorus - to introduce the film proper, while fireworks go off behind him.

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Taps Review


Very Good
Thank goodness that Timothy Hutton didn't have the career of, let's say, Sean Penn or Tom Cruise. It would have been tough to stomach years of fragile acting, the kind that some might label "sensitive," but soon becomes annoying. It's a good thing the same semi-anonymous fate didn't befall Penn or Cruise (before he apparently lost his mind). Both of them have sizeable roles in Taps, a solid 1981 drama featuring then-recent Academy Award winner Hutton. Cruise and Penn, both relatively unknown at the time, provide Taps with the soul-searching gravity that propels it beyond hunks-with-guns fare.

Hutton plays Brian, a loyal student and rising senior at a prestigious military school. With the school on the verge of closing, Brian and his classmates bear arms so the school remains open. Things start off grandly, with the boys holding off the state police and standing for their principles. As the days pass and the stakes get higher, the students (some of whom aren't in their teens) unravel. Are they doing the right thing or are they sticking with a lost cause?

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Bound For Glory Review


OK
It sounds like a kickboxing movie, but Bound for Glory is actually based on Woody Guthrie's memiors of the same title. David Carradine plays Guthrie as he rambles and strums and rambles some more, all the way through the dusty Depression in search of stardom. Lots of travelin'. And on and on for about 2 1/2 hours. Bound for Glory doesn't have so much a story as it does a series of vignettes between bouts of Carradine strumming Guthrie's signature tunes. Hope you like folk music, because there isn't much variety to be found among his music. Neither is there much variety in the scenery (though the film won an Oscar for cinematography): just one dust cloud after another, as we ramble across the country. Hell, the didn't call it the "Depression" for nothing. Check out The Grapes of Wrath for a far more interesting and dramatic look at the past.

Beverly Hills Cop Review


Excellent
Boy, looking back at Berverly Hills Cop, almost 20 years after its original release, it's easy to see why people fell in love with the movie, earning a then unheard-of of $316 million worldwide (the highest grossing R-rated movie ever) and propelling Eddie Murphy from a funny ensemble player in films like Trading Places and 48 HRS. to a megastar.

Beverly Hills Cop is actually a bit of a nutty idea -- combine a standard cop actioner with a fish out of water tale. Who would've thought that would be any good? But it works, and how, with Murphy turning in perhaps his funniest performance ever -- mocking the supporting cast at every turn (favorite targets: gay men, uptight men, and gay/uptight men) and tossing off one-liners like he's got a wad of them stuffed in his pocket. His Axel Foley, one of the most widely impersonated characters in film (remember the popularity of the "Mumford Phys. Ed." sweatshirt?), heads from rough-and-tumble Detroit to prim-and-proper Beverly Hills to investigate the murder of his best friend, uncovering a much bigger plot, of course.

Continue reading: Beverly Hills Cop Review

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Ronny Cox Movies

Beyond the Reach Movie Review

Beyond the Reach Movie Review

With a spectacular setting and two solid actors on-screen, this thriller builds enough solid suspense...

Beyond The Reach Trailer

Beyond The Reach Trailer

The cast and crew of forthcoming thriller 'Beyond The Reach' including producer Robert Mitas, director...

Beyond The Reach Trailer

Beyond The Reach Trailer

Deserts are inhospitable places at the best of times. For one young man, things are...

Imagine That Movie Review

Imagine That Movie Review

Undemanding audiences may warm to the strong cast and crew of this family comedy, even...

Imagine That Trailer

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Watch the trailer for Imagine That.Evan is a very successful businessman but doesn't really take...

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Total Recall Movie Review

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