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Ron Perlman - Premiere Of 'Skin Trade' at the Egyptian Theatre - Arrivals at Egyptian Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 7th May 2015

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Ron Perlman, Opal Perlman and Blake Perlman
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Ron Perlman and Opal Perlman
Ron Perlman and Opal Perlman
Ron Perlman, Celina Jade, Tony Jaa and Dolph Lundgren

Ron Perlman - Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild Awards - Arrivals at Paramount Theater, Paramount Studio - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 14th February 2015

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Ron Perlman

Ron Perlman - Los Angeles premiere of 'The Book of Life' - Arrivals at Regal 14 at LA Live Downtown - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 12th October 2014

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Ron Perlman - Premiere Of Lionsgate Films' "The Expendables 3" held at TCL Chinese Theatre. The Expendables 3 has vast cast of action stars, a high quality version was reportedly leaked on the internet - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 12th August 2014

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Ron Perlman

Christina Applegate and Ron Perlman - Comic-Con International: San Diego - 20th Century Fox presentation at San Diego Convention Center - San Diego, California, United States - Friday 25th July 2014

Christina Applegate and Ron Perlman
Christina Applegate

Ron Perlman - The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Relativity At Ten Luncheon - Cap d'Antibes, United Kingdom - Sunday 18th May 2014

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Ron Perlman and Blake Perlman - "American Hustle" - Los Angeles Premiere at Directors Guild Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 3rd December 2013

Ron Perlman and Blake Perlman
Ron Perlman
Ron Perlman and Blake Perlman

Ron Perlman, Charlie Hunnam, Kim Coates, Katey Sagal and Kurt Sutter - FX's "Sons Of Anarchy" Season 6 Premiere Screening Held at Dolby Theatre - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 7th September 2013

Ron Perlman, Charlie Hunnam, Kim Coates, Katey Sagal and Kurt Sutter
Ron Perlman
Ron Perlman
Theo Rossi, Paris Barclay, Ron Perlman, Charlie Hunnam, Kim Coates, Katey Sagal and Kurt Sutter

Ron Perlman - Ron Perlman leaving Arclight theatre - West Hollwood, CA, United States - Thursday 22nd August 2013

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Ron Perlman
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Ron Perlman

Paul Reiser, Joe Mantegna, Ed Begley, Jr, Dabney Coleman, Dick Van Dyke, Ron Perlman, Kevin Pollack, Kevin Dobson, D.B. Sweeney and Guests - The late Peter Falk is honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 25th July 2013

Paul Reiser, Joe Mantegna, Ed Begley, Jr, Dabney Coleman, Dick Van Dyke, Ron Perlman, Kevin Pollack, Kevin Dobson, D.b. Sweeney and Guests
Paul Reiser, Joe Mantegna, Ed Begley and Jr
Paul Reiser, Joe Mantegna, Ed Begley and Jr
Councilmember Mitch O'farrell, Joe Mantegna, Leron Gubler, Paul Reiser, Ed Begley, Jr and David Green
Paul Reiser, Joe Mantegna, Ed Begley and Jr
Paul Reiser, Joe Mantegna, Ed Begley and Jr

Ron Perlman - Celebrities arriving at NFL Quarterback Matt Leinart's 7th Annual Celebrity Bowl - Hollywood, CA, United States - Thursday 18th July 2013

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Ron Perlman

Opal Perlman Stone, Ron Perlman and Blake Perlman - Los Angeles premiere of 'Pacific Rim' held at the Dolby Theatre - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 9th July 2013

Ron Perlman, Opal Perlman Stone and Blake Perlman
Ron Perlman and Family
Opal Perlman Stone, Ron Perlman and Blake Perlman
Opal Perlman Stone, Ron Perlman and Blake Perlman
Ron Perlman
Ron Perlman

Ron Perlman - Los Angeles premiere of 'Pacific Rim' held at the Dolby Theatre - Outside Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 9th July 2013

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Ron Perlman

George Lopez, JoBeth Williams and Ron Perlman - The Screen Actors Guild Foundation hosts it's 4th Annual Los Angeles Golf Classic - Burbank, California, United States - Monday 10th June 2013

George Lopez, Jobeth Williams and Ron Perlman
George Lopez
George Lopez

Ron Perlman - Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo 2013 (C2E2) - Chicago, IL, United States - Friday 26th April 2013

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Ron Perlman

Ron Perlman - Ron Perlman tries to cover his face from photos whilst walking along Brighton Way in Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 8th April 2013

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Ron Perlman

Ron Perlman - 2013 FX Upfront Presentation - Arrivals - New York City, NY, United States - Thursday 28th March 2013

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Ron Perlman
Ron Perlman and Charlie Hunnam
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Ron Perlman - Ron Perlman is seen at Fred Segal enjoying lunch with a friend. - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Friday 15th March 2013

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Ron Perlman Friday 6th January 2012 walking his dog in Manhattan New York City, USA

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Ron Perlman Monday 12th September 2011 National Multiple Sclerosis Society's 37th annual Dinner of Champions Century City, California

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Marmaduke Trailer


Marmaduke is perhaps the world's most famous Great Dane, he was originally brought to life in a newspaper comic strip drawn in the 1950's by Brad Anderson. Now Marmaduke is set to make his motion picture debut. When the Winslow family (along with Marmaduke and their cat Carlos) make a move to LA, Marmaduke pictures the perfect life from now on, after all - LA is home to some of the best dog parks in the world! However, when he arrives, the parks are great but how could any dog from outside LA deal with all the rivalry between Mutts vs. Pedigrees! It might take Marmaduke a little longer to find his 'pawing' than he first thought.

Continue: Marmaduke Trailer

Battle For Terra Review


Very Good
Made two years before the similarly themed Avatar, this original, vividly designed sci-fi animation makes an astute commentary on current issues. And this depth of feeling more than makes up for the relatively slack pace and thin characters.

When a giant ship of humans arrives at an isolated planet, they don't really understand that the residents are living in peace with nature and others. So they launch an all-out attack on the world they have named Terra. But a feisty local named Mala (Wood) stands up to them, teaming up with crash-landed earthling Stanton (Wilson) and his robot sidekick (Cross). And earth's General Hemmer (Cox) is more than happy to indulge in annihilation top get his hands on this planet.

Continue reading: Battle For Terra Review

Season Of The Witch Trailer


Watch the trailer for Season Of The Witch

Continue: Season Of The Witch Trailer

Mutant Chronicles Review


Terrible
She's become something of an icon in the worst possible sense. Glowering in the background, her face a mask of fury, her eyes piercing and yet remote, this young woman is almost always adept in both samurai-styled swordplay as well as gymnastics skills that rival anything seen on Earth. She speaks little, never dates, and almost always has a torturous family history. You've seen her kicking her way through almost every futuristic action film to hit screens this decade -- from The Matrix to The Chronicles of Riddick. Meet the new sci-fi femme fatale. She's been exclusively designed by Tinseltown engineers to whet the appetites (and other parts) of the largely male, Internet-based fanboy universe.

And God is she getting dull.

Continue reading: Mutant Chronicles Review

Outlander Review


Bad
We are apparently in the midst of a minor Viking renaissance. In 2007, Marcus Nispel followed up his successful revamp of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre with the little seen Pathfinder. Centering on an orphaned Norsemen, the Native Americans who raised him, and their battle against returning Scandinavian hordes, it was not a box office success. Heck, one imagines that most people reading this opening paragraph don't even know the movie existed. Now comes Outlander, a surreal sci-fi link up of Alien, Predator, Species, and Beowulf. When it stays in space, it works. When it hits the ancient lands of Odin however, it flops around like fetid smoked fish.

On his way back to his home planet on a funereal mission, extraterrestrial Kainan (James Caviezel) discovers a deadly alien beast known as a Moorwen onboard his ship. It causes the vessel to crash land in Norway circa the 7th century. After getting his bearings and sending a distress signal, Kainan begins to explore the area. He is soon trapped by warrior Wulfric (Jack Huston) and taken to the fortified stronghold of King Rothgar (John Hurt) and his wild, unwieldy daughter Freya (Sophia Myles).

Continue reading: Outlander Review

Hellboy II: The Golden Army Review


Excellent
Get in a discussion about comic-book movies and someone will indubitably bring up this theory: Part one of a comic-book movie anthology is always just OK; the series peaks with part two; and in part three (usually the final chapter) everything falls apart. (Think X-Men, Spider-man, and Superman). Hellboy II only furthers this theory. Part one, though visually sensational, delivered a weak jab in terms of its story, characters, and writing. But its sequel connects with a mighty punch, delivering everything you could possibly want from a summer blockbuster and more.

Hellboy II takes the fantastic make-up artistry, creature creation, and set design that we grew fond of in Pan's Labyrinth and combines all of these elements with mindblowing CGI and stunning choreography. The script this time around is sharp and witty; you'll be laughing for most of this movie (which is good, because Hellboy II would look silly if it took itself too seriously). Most importantly, the movie contains some of the best (i.e., least-fake-looking) action sequences I've ever seen in a comic-book movie, and lots of them, too, which makes it even better than Iron Man, its biggest summer contender next to the upcoming Dark Knight.

Continue reading: Hellboy II: The Golden Army Review

In The Name Of The King: A Dungeon Siege Tale Review


Terrible
Uwe Boll has no soul. He has no moviemaking skill or artistic acumen, either. Yet somehow, thanks to a deal with the devil, someone trying to launder a buttload of illicit cash, or a back room loaded with blackmail fodder, he keeps getting to regularly desecrate cinema -- i.e. direct films. Terry Gilliam can't get a job. David Lynch has to go to home movie technology to get something made, and yet this German joke has no less than nine projects either completed or in development, and his latest is staining a theater screen somewhere near you. As usual, Boll is about five years late to the Lord of the Rings ripoff race. However, if you're longing for another lame copy of every crappy sword-and-sorcery epic ever made, In the Name of the King is it.

The story is a little scattered, but the main narrative strand involves a chiseled chump named Farmer (Jason Statham), who vows vengeance on the evil Krugs for destroying his family. Along with pal Norick (Ron Pearlman) and brother-in-law Bastian (Will Sanderson), they defy King Konreid (Burt Reynolds; yes, you read that right) and head out looking for payback. Along the way, they confront the mud-dog creatures led by wicked wizard Gallian (Ray Liotta; yes, you read that right as well). Our malevolent magic maker has been literally sucking the power out of his rival Merick's (John Rhys-Davis) daughter Muriella (Leelee Sobieski; so here's where she went!), and with the help of the ruler's inelegant nephew Fallow (Matthew Lillard), he plans to overthrow the court and use the Krug as his new army. On the way to a final confrontation between Farmer and Gallian, we get lots of pseudo-spectacle swordplay, some bad CGI vistas, and a visit from Cirque de Soleil in the form of acrobatic tree-dwellers whose leader (Kristanna Loken) hates humans.

Continue reading: In The Name Of The King: A Dungeon Siege Tale Review

The Last Winter Review


Very Good
"This is the last winter. Total collapse. Hope dies." So writes an environmental researcher in a previously untouched part of Alaskan wilderness now being opened up for oil exploration in Larry Fessenden's The Last Winter. Using the doomsaying of climate change prognosticators as an effectively menacing backdrop, more so even than the bleak chill of the Alaskan tundra, Fessenden's film drops a knot of oil workers into an isolated research station and watches what happens as everyone realizes that something inexplicable is happening all around them. It's a horror film that sneaks up on you with an effectively unsettling and brooding atmosphere before unleashing an apocalyptic fury.

Clearly drawing heavily on films like John Carpenter's The Thing as inspiration, Fessenden builds his characters from the ground up before hurling them to the wolves. He's helped by a cast that's sharp as a tack, particularly the roaring and bear-like Ron Perlman as Ed Pollack, an oil company operative gung-ho on getting machinery up to their station as quick as possible, by any means necessary, and screw the environment. Facing him are a couple of "green flags" -- one of whom is the gloomy notebook scribbler, scientist James Hoffman, played close to the vest by the always reliable James LeGros -- environmental do-gooders hired by the company as sort of eco-fig leaves whom they want to pressure to sign off on impact statements so the drilling can begin. In between are Abby Sellers (Connie Britton), a tough-as-nails type caught in a love triangle, the dazed and confused mechanic Motor (Kevin Corrigan, nailing it), and their Native American cook Dawn Russell (singer Joanne Shenandoah).

Continue reading: The Last Winter Review

Price Of Glory Review


OK
Father knows best. Ex-boxer Arturo Ortega (Jimmy Smits, Bless the Child) has placed his three sons on the assembly line for success, manufacturing them into perfect fighting champions. With his high intensity training, they'll be given the opportunities he never had. When his kids grow up and each decides to pursue opportunities in and out of the ring, the family unit starts to crumble. Can they weather the Price of Glory?

The standard repertoire of confrontation, hope, and tragedy all fall into place. Arturo thinks one of his boys doesn't have the makings of a champion, but maybe he isn't looking hard enough. Another son (Jon Seda, Selena) wants to get married, but settling down could ruin his shot at the big title. Familiar archetypes emerge and follow their routes to a traditional grand finale.

Continue reading: Price Of Glory Review

Cronos Review


Very Good
Watch Alias? You spent two seasons hearing about that Rambaldi device and what did you get by way of payoff? Absolutely nothing. Well, consider Cronos the finale that you never got, as its little bit of alchemy from the past is as good as anything J.J. Abrams could have come up with, I'm sure.

In a career of so-so horror movies (Mimic, Blade II), Guillermo del Toro made his biggest impression with Cronos, an alternately sweet, funny, and creepy horrorshow the likes of which we don't often see.

Continue reading: Cronos Review

The Shaft Review


Weak
In a perverse way, you might consider The Shaft to be a kooky prequel to The Ring. (Get it?) Both feature possessed/demonic household items (elevator/videotape) and both star Naomi Watts as a reporter.

You might also consider that if you decide to watch a movie with a title like The Shaft, that's exactly what you'll get... the shaft.

Continue reading: The Shaft Review

The City Of Lost Children Review


Very Good
The long-awaited follow-up to Delicatessen is another surrealist adventure into the questionably sane minds of French creators Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro. It's been four years since that film, and their new picture, The City of Lost Children, is twice as strange and almost as good.

A twist on the typical fairy tale, The City of Lost Children is the story of an evil genius named Krank (Daniel Emilfork) and his henchmen of mechanically-enhanced Cyclops, six identical Clones (all played by Dominique Pinon), the tiny and bossy Miss Bismuth (Mireille Mosse), and a disembodied brain (voiced by Jean-Louis Trintignant) which provides the philosophical foundation for the group. The band of genetically-engineered characters live on a man-made island off shores of a coastal city, and it is from this city that Krank's thugs kidnap children. Why? Because Krank is unable to dream, he attempts to steal them from the children's minds.

Continue reading: The City Of Lost Children Review

Romeo Is Bleeding Review


Good
Lena Olin is up to her old tricks again, as are Gary Oldman, Juliette Lewis, and Annabella Sciorra, in this twisted tale of a slightly corrupt cop and the company he keeps. Not much about Romeo is Bleeding sticks with you for long, the exception being Olin's shrieking hit-woman who ends up with one arm... Delightfully bizarre.

The Ice Pirates Review


Good
Yeah, that's Anjelica Huston in a campy sci-fi spoof, but that doesn't mean it ever takes itself seriously.

Robert Urich stars as a space pirate in the far future, when there's no more water in the galaxy, and pirates work the shipping lanes of open space to steal what ice there is left. Urich's Jason winds up in a plot involving a kidnapped princess, an evil empire, and a visit to "the seventh world," which includes time travel,

Continue reading: The Ice Pirates Review

Enemy At The Gates Review


OK
It's Stalingrad, late 1942. A young Russian sharpshooter is picking off Germans at will, bringing a much-needed lift to a demoralized Soviet army. The impatient Nazis send their top sniper to kill the man. A World War diminishes in scope to a battle of two. With such a promising plot, absolutely ripe for gutsy drama and emotion, why does Enemy at the Gates ultimately fail?

First, and foremost, because of its screenplay. Director Jean-Jacques Annaud (Seven Years in Tibet, The Bear) and partner Alain Godard take a horrific true tale and sap it of its energy, irony, and tension. It starts off impressively enough: Russian soliders are immediately gunned down as they arrive in Stalingrad -- if not by the enemy, then by their own officers, who kill the boys when they retreat in terror. Vassily Zaitsev (Jude Law) becomes an instant hero when he plays dead, and in sniper fashion, shoots a number of unsuspecting Nazis.

Continue reading: Enemy At The Gates Review

Titan A.E. Review


Weak
Good Will Hunting goes to space in Titan A.E., an ill-conceived and overambitious animation blowout (courtesy of 20th Century Fox) that makes recent Disney fare look like thinking men's movies.

Matt Damon's voice stars as Cale, an eager-beaver twentysomething in the year 3028 who would be just like any other next-millennium Gen X-er if not for one thing: A race of evil beings called the Drej -- made of pure energy, natch -- have blown up the earth.

Continue reading: Titan A.E. Review

Blade II Review


Excellent
The original Blade was a demonstration of frenzied visual effects, a technological vampire bloodbath with no meaning or direction. Although the series is still very physical, emphasizing battle sequences and special effects over story and characters, Blade II knows where the first film went awry and does not repeat those mistakes. Instead of creating a dizzying collage of delinquent action sequences, this film focuses its excitement. It's not all over the map; it actually knows where it's headed and what it's doing.

Exploding from the pages of Marvel Comics, Blade, born half-man, half vampire after a bloodsucker attacked his pregnant mother, vowed to protect humanity from the dark, secret world of evil vampires. Armed with an arsenal of lead and garlic, Blade continues to fight the never-ending war between the living and the undead.

Continue reading: Blade II Review

The Island Of Dr. Moreau (1996) Review


Terrible
A glaring example of just how bad Hollywood can be, the second remake of The Island of Lost Souls is undoubtedly the worse of the two. Marlon Brando wins the prize as worst actor ever, a beached whale in clown makeup with a (really) little person (sporting a fleshy tail, natch) as his mute sidekick. The story adds nothing to the Dr. Moreau legend -- with David Thewlis a plane crash victim who is semi-imprisoned on the island along with a megalomaniacal Val Kilmer -- aside from some modern-day genetic engineering reactionism and some of the cheesiest special effects this side of Ed Wood. Simply awful, a train wreck that takes two hours.

The Trial Of Old Drum Review


Good
Did you know the Animal Planet network makes movies? You better believe it!

This coming-of-age story follows just what we'd expect: a boy and his dog in 1950s middle America (and a true story, at that). Old Drum is the dog, and Bobby Edner is the kid (a kid who looks like that kid in all these movies). And of course, the dog's amazing: He even pulls him out of a lake after his raft falls apart and conks him unconscious. And when a pack of wild dogs attack, Drum single-handedly kills them all, taking serious wounds in the process. (He recovers, of course, to become the town hero -- those wild dogs are killing the local sheep!)

Continue reading: The Trial Of Old Drum Review

Hellboy Review


Good
You can't help but dig Hellboy the character - born a demon, summoned by Nazis, saved by Americans, raised to fight otherworldly evil creatures, and played by Ron Perlman.

What you feel about Hellboy the movie is an altogether different topic.

Continue reading: Hellboy Review

Alien: Resurrection Review


Weak
I'm not entirely sure how to begin a review of the highly-anticipated (at least for me) fourth installment of the Alien series except to say... what a letdown.

Sigourney Weaver's Ellen Ripley died in Alien3, the movie that was supposed to put the nail in the Alien coffin, but thanks to the miracles of next-millennium cloning, she's back, and full of alien DNA to boot (thus making her invincible, giving her acid for blood, and generally a pretty creepy chick). This new twist has great potential, as Ripley's alien side gives her a strange kinship with the creatures... creatures that once again are loosed by idiot scientists trying to tame them.

Continue reading: Alien: Resurrection Review

The Name Of The Rose Review


OK
Franciscan and Benedictine monks are dispatched to a remote monastery to resolve a dispute over doctrine in The Name of the Rose. When William of Baskerville (Sean Connery) and his novice Adso (a very young Christian Slater) arrive, they find the discussions have been stalled by the death of a young, talented scribe. The resident monks are all atwitter, wringing their hands and worrying that the murder is a sign of the apocalypse. Their fervor reaches a fever pitch as more of their brethren begin to turn up dead, describing some choice passages of Revelations. So William fires up his logic, ceaselessly name checks Aristotle and begins to piece together a mystery that involves secret secular knowledge, a labyrinthine library, and a struggle between wild religious superstition and cold reason.

Based on Umberto Eco's dense and demanding bestseller, The Name of the Rose, is basically a love letter to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Unfortunately, the film version never passes up an opportunity to remind us of that fact.

Continue reading: The Name Of The Rose Review

Star Trek: Nemesis Review


Weak

"Star Trek" films have always faced considerable scrutiny from their detail-oriented fans, so one would think by the 10th big screen outing the shepherds of the series would know better than to make a movie full of flubs.

Yet while "Star Trek: Nemesis" is a formidable, dignified sci-fi adventure when sticking to the substance of its story -- about a baneful young clone of Capt. Picard leading enemy aliens in battle against the starship Enterprise -- the picture grows decidedly flimsier with its many out-sized, out of character and logically porous action set pieces.

Take, for example, the silly dune buggy sequence in which Picard (Patrick Stewart), android Lt. Commander Data (Brent Spiner) and Klingon Lt. Commander Worf (Michael Dorn) go conspicuously gallivanting around the planet of a pre-warp civilization (a violation of Star Fleet's Prime Directive that goes completely unaddressed), being shot at by locals and staging daredevil stunts, a la "XXX."

Continue reading: Star Trek: Nemesis Review

Happy, Texas Review


OK

"Happy, Texas" wins this years award for dumbest plot in an enjoyable movie.

A ridiculous yarn about two escaped cons posing as gay beauty pageant directors while they hole up in a small town, most of the comedy here is barely above sketch caliber, but the movie's fantastic cast takes it to another level.

Steve Zahn (the dimwit stoner in "Out of Sight") and Jeremy Northam (from "An Ideal Husband" and "The Winslow Boy," but sounding all-American here) star as the convicts, who escape a west Texas chain gang and hijack an RV that, unbeknownst to them, belongs to the real gay pageant directors.

Continue reading: Happy, Texas Review

Titan Ae Review


OK

Save its ambitious, eye-popping computer-generated space battle effects, 20th Century Fox's second run at Disney's animation crown is little more than another threadbare cartoon orphan story ("Dinosaur," "Anastasia," "The Lion King," etc.) dressed up in wannabe-anime style and targeted at 11-year-old boys with a toy-friendly, sci-fi storyline and a bad, bad, bad guitar rock soundtrack.

Taking place in a distant future when the Earth has been destroyed and the remnants of mankind are adrift in the galaxy, "Titan AE" follows handsome, cocky, cusp-of-manhood Cale (voice of Matt Damon), the son of a valiant military martyr in our planet's brief defense against a race of energy beings called the Drej.

The Drej blew up Earth with their giant crystalline space ship in an expensive-looking CGI sequence when Cale was just a boy, and now they're hunting what's left of humanity as we flee through the stars. What, exactly, the Drej have against us, the movie doesn't bother to explain. The fact that they look like a lava lamp versions the Terminator's skeleton signals they're bad news, so who needs to bother with, you know, motive?

Continue reading: Titan Ae Review

Hellboy Review


OK

The origin of the mutants in "X-Men" is a concept based on evolution that requires only a little suspension of disbelief. But a whole lot of supernatural B-movie overkill goes into the birth of the title character in "Hellboy" -- including occultish Nazis, a resurrected Rasputin, and the opening of an intergalactic wormhole meant to unleash the "seven gods of chaos" (whatever they are) upon the Earth.

The pre-credits sequence of this effects-heavy summer's-come-early superhero action flick -- based on Mike Mignola's cult comic of the same name -- is a real eye-roller, especially since a battalion of G.I. Joes sent expressly to stop this fascist-black-magic conspiracy just sits on its collective hands doing nothing until the whole shebang is already underway.

But once writer-director Guillermo del Toro ("Blade II," "The Devil's Backbone") moves into the modern day -- where the demon-like spawn of that evil experiment has paradoxically grown into a muscle-bound, horn-headed, red-skinned and stone-fisted, paranormal, crime-fighting anti-hero called Hellboy -- the film settles into a distinctively sharp, sardonic rhythm full of character and imagination.

Continue reading: Hellboy Review

Looney Tunes: Back In Action Review


Good

There's nothing more satisfying as a movie critic than going into a screening with low expectations and coming out tickled pink and grinning ear to ear, which is exactly what happened to me when I saw "Looney Tunes: Back in Action."

Fully anticipating another gimmick-driven shoulder-shrug of a live-action/cartoon hybrid like 1996's "Space Jam," I hadn't put enough faith in director Joe Dante ("Gremlins," "Small Soldiers"), who has been a rabid aficionado of Warner Bros. cartoons his whole life, and who poured every ounce of that enthusiasm into this screwball flick.

Although it gets off to a weak start with a studio board meeting where the humans are worse actors than the cartoons (and interact with them unconvincingly), after it sluffs off its clumsy plot establishing -- in which Daffy Duck is fired by the suits -- it becomes as truly looney-tooney as a fan of classic Warner shorts could ever dream of.

Continue reading: Looney Tunes: Back In Action Review

Enemy At The Gates Review


OK

The first half-hour of "Enemy at the Gates" is a cinematically stunning, hyper-realistic battlefield nightmare that transports the viewer right into the heart of the Nazis' yearlong siege of Stalingrad during World War II.

"Autumn, 1942," deplores the period-style voiceover as a shadow creeps across an illustrative map in an updated homage to old-timey war pictures. "Europe lies crushed under the Nazi jackboot..."

German planes dive-bomb troop transports in an incredible attack sequence. Sweeping shots the color of mud and blood take in the scale of the besieged city's cold, yet smoldering ruins while Red Army officers recite threatening propaganda to masses of soldiers who would rather flee.

Continue reading: Enemy At The Gates Review

Ron Perlman

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Ron Perlman Movies

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them - Clips Trailer

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them - Clips Trailer

The time is drawing ever closer to the release of Fantastic Beasts And Where to...

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Trailer

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Trailer

Newt Scamander is a wizard who's always had an interest in monsters and wild, unworldly...

Fantastic Beasts And Where to Find Them Trailer

Fantastic Beasts And Where to Find Them Trailer

Long before Harry Potter - or his parents - took up residence at Hogwarts, there...

Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them - Teaser Trailer

Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them - Teaser Trailer

Long before the time of Harry Potter, wizards and witches still lived their lives in...

Moonwalkers Trailer

Moonwalkers Trailer

CIA agent Kidman isn't a guy that likes to be messed around and when he's...

Stonewall Trailer

Stonewall Trailer

Danny Winters is a young man in 1969, who becomes disenfranchised from the marginalisation and...

Poker Night Movie Review

Poker Night Movie Review

This dark thriller is so relentlessly stylish that it's distracting. Refusing to settle down to...

The Book Of Life Trailer

The Book Of Life Trailer

Manolo has a lot of pressure forced upon him from his family regarding his future,...

The House Of Magic Trailer

The House Of Magic Trailer

When Thunder is abandoned into the street by his owner as a kitten during a...

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