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Ron Cook - Doctor Faustus gala evening at Duke Of York's Theatre - Outside Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 25th April 2016

Ron Cook

Ron Cook - The Homecoming Gala Night at the Trafalgar Studios - Departures - London, United Kingdom - Monday 23rd November 2015

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Ron Cook - 'The Homecoming' press night at Trafalgar Studios - London, United Kingdom - Friday 20th November 2015

Ron Cook
Ron Cook

Ron Cook - RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show - Press Day at Hampton Court, Hampton Court Palace - Surrey, United Kingdom - Monday 29th June 2015

Ron Cook

Jeremy Piven Will Return As Mr. Selfridge In Fourth Season


Jeremy Piven Ron Cook Samuel West

Jeremy Piven will reprise his role as Mr. Selfridge for a fourth season of the popular period drama. The upcoming series of the ITV hit will be broadcast in 2016. Piven confirmed the news on Good Morning Britain on Friday (13th March).

Jeremy Piven
Jeremy Piven stars in Mr. Selfridge.

Read More: Entourage Movie Shoots Final Scenes on Golden Globes Red Carpet.

Continue reading: Jeremy Piven Will Return As Mr. Selfridge In Fourth Season

Ron Cook - Ron Cook, London, England - at the press night of Mike Poulton's new production of 'Luise Miller' at The Donmar Warehouse. Monday 13th June 2011

Land Of The Blind Review


Terrible
Not to be bested by Quills and Geoffrey Rush, Land of the Blind had the bright idea to have a scene where Donald Sutherland writes in his own excrement. To do one better, you see the feces plunked down right there in Sutherland's hand. Was this where Sutherland saw his career going? Was he just winding up his pitch with Klute, Don't Look Now, and last year's stellar take on Pride & Prejudice? Was it all really just to get to the point where he could write jibber-jabber about freedom and anarchy in his own poop? Please, Donny, say it ain't so.Sutherland plays Thorne, an imprisoned playwright whose writings have been deemed too inflammatory. The world he lives in is run by a dictator (Tom Hollander) who casts Hollywood actors as news anchors and makes movies that resemble DV versions of Jerry Bruckheimer films. It isn't until a soldier, Joe (Ralph Fiennes), starts listening to Thorne's articulate ramblings that things start happening. Joe busts Thorne out of prison and allows him to exact revenge on the dictator and his wife (a useless Lara Flynn Boyle). The ink is still wet on the new constitution when Thorne becomes a dictator too, sending his friend Joe to the torture chambers for not agreeing with his new regime.Is this what we have stooped to for leftist political films? Robert Edwards' film for one reason or another really thinks it's saying something. It punctuates the cruelty of both the left and the ultra right with equal measures, but it never really shows examples of what is good in either ideology. It highlights the "everyman" as hero, but never sees Fiennes' character as anything besides an ideology that is up for bid. The fact that Edwards fits Joe with a family is absolutely absurd because we don't care about Joe as a character; he is simply there for us to see the effect that politics have on a normal person. It's hollow and criminally indecisive.If anything, you can say that Land of the Blind has excessive, somewhat stylish design production. The castle that the dictator lives in resembles the excessive architecture of some palace in Barcelona. However, this gentle stab at stylizing brings to mind that Edwards was trying to do what none have succeeded at: attempt to follow up Terry Gilliam's Brazil. Not even Gilliam himself, who has made successful, even great films like The Fisher King and Twelve Monkeys, has ever been able to bring his style and politics to such a fantastic torrent. It's possible to see where Edwards' heart might have been in the right place, but his film is too clever, too cold, and too completely self-aware to ever really embrace an everyman like Joe.Hey, Donny, Altman is still making movies, so is Roeg. You have options.

On A Clear Day Review


Very Good
Over here in America, it seems we just cannot get enough of the gentle shenanigans of average, everyday Brits. If they are slightly older and perhaps finding themselves financially strapped and driven to eyebrow-raising lengths by the hard times, well, so much the better. Into this proud lineage comes On a Clear Day a charming, if slight, bit of fluff from across the pond that has nothing whatsoever to do with the similarly-titled Barbra Streisand musical from the '70s.Peter Mullan plays Frank, a quiet, middle-aged Scot who is left floundering when he is laid off from his shipbuilding job. He embarks on a mission, seemingly on a lark, to swim the English Channel in an effort to give himself purpose and shed personal demons that have plagued him for years. Admittedly, this is quite thin, plotwise, but if we learned anything but a new dance routine from The Full Monty, it's that working-class British fellows made redundant can be remarkably entertaining in keeping themselves occupied.Though he staunchly refuses to tell his family anything about his intentions, Frank has a small clique of friends - former coworkers, mostly - serving as his motley training crew, headed by a put-upon Chinese fish-and-chips vendor (Benedict Wong) and given hyper energy by the cheerfully hapless Danny (Billy Boyd). They are caught up in Frank's determination to change his life, and predictably inspired to do something new with their own, and it is remarkably sweet and uplifting in a straightforward and non-saccharine way, a rarity these days.First-time feature director Gaby Dellal has crafted a dutifully small and endearing bit of fluff, only faltering briefly with some easily-forgiven flaws. She does fall victim to a hallmark of young directors - the need to be unnecessarily flashy - with her shooting of action via its reflection in a small domed mirror or her slow pans of an ordinary boat. Also, the film is not adept at offering fleshed-out logic. Why this unassuming Scottish man takes on a personal mission to swim the Channel, or what he hopes it will accomplish - and what it does ultimately accomplish - is left unaddressed and open to interpretation. But if you accept the pull of those crazy urges we get from time to time - the desire to do something stupid, and hard, and to revel in a feeling of true accomplishment - then that is probably sufficient in the way of movie logic.What gives the film layers and makes it so watchable is the extremely capable acting. Mullan (My Name is Joe, Young Adam) is an immensely likeable actor, and his Frank is an amiable and capable fellow, but he can also be profoundly frustrating. Being taciturn is one thing, but he often seems to outright ignore his wife (the adorably floopy Brenda Blethyn). And he is deeply scarred by the death of his son nearly 25 years ago, but he's so distant from his surviving son that it borders on rude. This persistent haze that surrounds poor Frank, and mires him into such melancholic inaction, is what prevents On a Clear Day from being a straight-up comedy. All of the characters are witty and quirky (though not aggressively so) and have their moments of amusing antics, but they are also each battling a very real sadness, and the film does well in striking a balance between the two.There is little about On a Clear Day that is especially profound or innovative, to be sure. The most effusive praise it will likely garner is that it is genuinely cute and sweet without becoming twee or simplistic. That said, there is certainly a place - and a market - for films like these. I certainly know what I'll be telling my Auntie to see the next time she tells me they don't make "nice movies" anymore.Nope, can't see forever.

Topsy-Turvy Review


Good
One of my earliest childhood remembrances was watching a performance of H.M.S. Pinafore. I thought it was really neat. The costumes and music were amazing and even though I couldn't understand all of what was going on, I was fascinated by how all of these people worked together.

Now 20 years later, while watching another Gilbert and Sullivan performance (of sorts) I am still thinking the same things.

Continue reading: Topsy-Turvy Review

Lucky Break Review


Good
Prison flick meets musical comedy in this oddball conflagration of genres, a British feel-good flick that just so happens to be the follow-up film director Peter Cattaneo made after The Full Monty. Four years went by, Cattaneo's name became all but forgotten, and films like this became Cattaneo's legacy. (Four years after Lucky Break, Cattaneo is finally shooting his next film.) The lovely Olivia Williams shoulders a lot of love here as the object of one prisoner's sights -- at least when he isn't doing double duty as a showman in the warden's play and planning his big escape. Lively enough to keep you paying attention through to the end, even if the whole affair is a bit absurdly silly.

Topsy Turvy Review


Good

Director Mike Leigh has usurped his subjects' mirthful sense of humor and penchant for prolonged presentation in his new film "Topsy-Turvy," a jaunty, jolly, light-hearted look at the lives of Victorian operetta architects Gilbert and Sullivan.

Like G&S, Leigh delights in garnishments that add color to his characters and to the pliant performances such details inspire.

Leigh's actors are always especially absorbed in their parts because of the way he works -- creating the screenplay in concert with his players during incessant rehearsals -- but in contrast to his downcast-but-hopeful, slice-of-life dramas ("Secrets and Lies," "Career Girls"), this picture radiates a distinct playfulness that is nothing short of contagious.

Continue reading: Topsy Turvy Review

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Ron Cook Movies

On a Clear Day Movie Review

On a Clear Day Movie Review

Over here in America, it seems we just cannot get enough of the gentle shenanigans...

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Topsy-Turvy Movie Review

Topsy-Turvy Movie Review

One of my earliest childhood remembrances was watching a performance of H.M.S. Pinafore. I thought...

Topsy Turvy Movie Review

Topsy Turvy Movie Review

Director Mike Leigh has usurped his subjects' mirthful sense of humor and penchant for prolonged...

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