Romola Garai

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Filming for 'Churchil'ls Secret'

Michael Gambon and Romola Garai - Filming for 'Churchil'ls Secret' - Kent, United Kingdom - Thursday 25th June 2015

Michael Gambon
Michael Gambon
Michael Gambon and ROMOLA GARAI
Michael Gambon and ROMOLA GARAI
Michael Gambon and ROMOLA GARAI

Filming scenes for 'Churchills Secret'

Matthew MacFadyen and Romola Garai - Filming scenes for 'Churchills Secret' at a manor house in Surrey - London, United Kingdom - Monday 22nd June 2015

Matthew Macfadyen and Romola Garai
Matthew Macfadyen and Romola Garai
Matthew Macfadyen and Romola Garai
Matthew Macfadyen and Romola Garai
Matthew Macfadyen and Romola Garai

Bugsy Malone - press night & afterparty

Romola Garai - Bugsy Malone - press night & afterparty held at the Lyric Hammersmith, Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 28th April 2015

Romola Garai
Romola Garai
Romola Garai

Suffragette - Teaser Trailer


Throughout the late 19th Century and early 20th Century, a secret war took place on the streets of England. For years, women of all ages and classes had fought for their right to vote, although they used politics and reason as their biggest weapon. When no clear results were seen, a specialist group formed a more radical idea - to take the political campaign out of the shadows and into the streets, with protests and fighting to gain what was theirs by right. But as the government fights back even harder, desperate times call for desperate measures. 

Continue: Suffragette - Teaser Trailer

the EE British Academy Film Awards held at The Opera House

Romola Garai - Various stars of film and television were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived for the the EE British Academy of Film and Television Awards which were held at The Opera House in London, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th February 2015

EE British Academy Film Awards 2015 - Arrivals

Romola Garai - EE British Academy Film Awards (BAFTA) at The Royal Opera House - Red Carpet Arrivals at Covent Garden, British Academy Film Awards - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th February 2015

Romola Garai
Romola Garai
Romola Garai
Romola Garai
Romola Garai

Junkhearts Review


Good
Riveting performances hold our attention even when this dark drama starts wallowing in the messy lives of its central characters. But there are glimmers of hope along the way, and a terrifyingly realistic depiction of addiction.

Frank (Marsan) is a recovering drunk who can't cope with his past as a military officer. He has lost his wife and daughter as a result, but he's snapped out of his stupor when he meets snarky homeless teen Lynette (Reid) and helps her get back on her feet. Then she brings her drug-dealing boyfriend Danny (Sturridge) into his flat, and Frank's grip on reality starts to waver as he hits the bottle again. Meanwhile, a wealthy businesswoman (Garai) struggles to balance motherhood with her personal and professional lives.

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One Day Review


Weak
Following a relationship on one day a year over more than 20 years is an interesting idea, and this film features a solid cast and some genuinely moving situations. But it's ultimately too slushy and dreamy to really resonate.

On St Swithin's Day, 15th July, in 1988, Emma (Hathaway) meets Dexter (Sturgess). Both are university students in Edinburgh, and there's a clear spark between them, but circumstances prevent them from becoming a couple. The years pass. Dexter moves from being an annoying TV host to a chef and has a daughter with Sylvie (Garai). Meanwhile, Emma has a career as a teacher and maintains an unsatisfying relationship with Ian (Spall). And they keep running into each other along the way, wondering what might have happened - and may yet happen - if they got together.

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One Day Trailer


Emma Morley and Dexter Mayhew meet at Edinburgh University and graduate on July 15th, 1988. On the same day, they spend a chaste night together and begin a friendship that will last for the rest of their lives.

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Glorious 39 Review


Excellent
Telling a story from a rarely examined period of British history, this pre-war drama is a bundle of suspense, mystery and personal emotion that's beautifully filmed and sharply played by a first-rate cast.

Anne (Garai) is the adopted eldest daughter of powerful politician Alexander Keyes (Nighy) and his wife (Agutter), who went on to have two of their own children (Redmayne and Temple). It's the glorious summer of 1939, when Britain felt like it had averted conflict with Hitler, so when Anne stumbles on hints of a government conspiracy, she turns to a fellow actor (Bonneville) and her boyfriend (Cox) for help. But the mystery only deepens, compounded by a sinister Home Office official (Northam) and the distracting presence of her Aunt Elizabeth (Christie).

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Atonement Review


OK
Halfway into his masterful 2005 adaptation of Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice, Joe Wright's camera enters the tight hallways and expansive rooms of a late-18th-century estate with several suites dedicated to smoking, gossiping and dancing. Fluidly drifting through encounters and gestures, the camera picks up the lilting remnants of conversations both benign and interesting. It's a miraculous and graceful scene that palpably exudes the feeling of being caught in a nest of gadflies.

The same shot can be found in Wright's adaptation of Ian McEwan's monumental Atonement, though the setting is now 1930s France. Three soldiers from London come upon a beach filled with soldiers waiting to return to their respective homelands. The camera glides past sergeants executing diseased horses, a choir of damaged infantry men and dozens of wounded battalions. Smoke bellows from scrap fires and a looming ferris wheel turns in the distance as the three English soldiers make their way into a bar.

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Amazing Grace Review


Good
For a film with all the stylistic panache of a BBC period yawner and all the moral ambiguity of an after-school special, Amazing Grace is a surprisingly entertaining political drama. It tells the story of famed British abolitionist William Wilberforce's struggle to end the slave trade in England. Its high-minded earnestness and longsuffering main character will remind movie buffs of another cinematic treatment of British history, A Man for All Seasons, but it's another similarity shared by these two films that sets Amazing Grace apart from all but a few mainstream movies being made today. Amazing Grace, like A Man for All Seasons, is a serious film about religious conviction and the power of individual believers to effect change in a world in need of redemption.

Make no mistake: Amazing Grace is not a complex movie. The good guys are good and the bad guys aren't so much bad as they are yet to become good. Such a simple and optimistic moral vision may seem antiquated to some, but Amazing Grace doesn't apologize for its old-fashioned piety. As the action starts, Wilberforce (Ioan Gruffudd) undergoes a religious conversion. His long-abandoned childhood faith has once again stirred his heart and moved him to commit to doing whatever he can to improve the world. Already a member of Parliament, he asks several of his friends -- including the clergyman John Newton (Albert Finney), who wrote the hymn "Amazing Grace" -- if he should continue his political career or move on to a more spiritual pursuit. At all of his friends' urging, Wilberforce chooses politics and not long after takes an unpopular stand on the issue that will dominate his political career thereafter: the slave trade.

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Renaissance Review


Good

Animation technology seems to be advancing at exponential speed. Each Pixar film easily out-wows the last, and computer-generated releases are now par-for-the-course for kiddie fare. So its no small achievement that the French drama Renaissance, the feature debut from director Christian Volckman, has one of the most intriguing visual styles in years.

Volckman combines motion-capture elements, computer animation, and meticulous black-and-white art for a unique style and fitting medium for his hard-boiled futuristic detective story. The city is Paris. The year is 2054. And the plot centers on a kidnapped girl, a steely cop, and a sci-fi conspiracy involving medicine, government and commerce.

Normally, it might take viewers a few revelatory scenes to get involved in a multi-layered potboiler, but you don't really get that opportunity here--your brain is too busy adjusting to the aesthetic. Renaissance's stark black-and-white imagery is just that: black, and white. Grays and shadows don't seem to surface (if there even are any). What's left is a palette of extremes, rich black and shockingly bare white, making both a visual statement and a narrative one.

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Nicholas Nickleby Review


OK
Poor Charles Dickens. He has the good fortune to be remembered by the entire world. What high school student hasn't been forced to suffer through Great Expectations? Nowadays, one of his books (and he didn't really write that many) is turned into a movie or a mini-series every year. (2001 saw four Dickens recreations on film or TV.)

2002 will earn but a single Dickens adaptation, a motion picture of Nicholas Nickleby, perhaps Dickens' least-read work and one of his most wandering (the novel being more than 800 pages long).

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I Capture the Castle Review


Extraordinary
Movies teach us the power of love. Reality, quickly and without apology, demonstrates its limitations. Rarely does a film show us the flipside, but I Capture the Castle is that special exception.

Based on Dodie Smith's novel, I Capture the Castle gives us a 17-year-old named Cassandra (Romola Garai), who spends most of her time writing in her journal. There is plenty of material around her. At the height of his literary fame, her father (Bill Nighy) bought an isolated castle on the English countryside. Twelve years later, circa mid-1930s, he hasn't written anything more than a laundry list and looks like a fine candidate for a straitjacket. As his creativity crumbles, so does his family, while the castle remains dank, dark, and home to quite a few rats.

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Romola Garai

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