Roddy Doyle

Roddy Doyle

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Irish Book Awards 2014

Roddy Doyle - Guests arrive at the Irish Book Awards 2014 at The Bord Gais Energy Theatre, Dublin, Ireland - 26.11.14. - Dublin, Ireland - Wednesday 26th November 2014

The Irish Book Awards 2014

Roddy Doyle - A variety of stars were photographed as they arrived at the 2014 Irish Book Awards which were held at The Bord Gais Energy Theatre in Dublin, Ireland - Wednesday 26th November 2014

Roy Keane launches his autobiography

Roddy Doyle and Roy Keane - Roy Keane launches his autobiography - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 9th October 2014

Roddy Doyle and Roy Keane
Roddy Doyle and Roy Keane
Roddy Doyle and Roy Keane

Roddy Doyle and Roy Keane to Pen Motivational Book, "The Second Half"


Roddy Doyle

The Booker prize-winning author of The Commitments, Roddy Doyle, is to team up with former Manchester United captain Roy Keane for a motivational memoir which "re-evaluates the meaning of success."

Roy KeaneRoy Keane's 2002 autobiography is one of the most controverisal sports books of all time.

The memoir, titled The Second Half, will become "a benchmark for sports autobiography," according to its publisher Orion. 

Continue reading: Roddy Doyle and Roy Keane to Pen Motivational Book, "The Second Half"

The Bord Gais Energy Irish Book Awards 2013

Michael Harding, Fintian O'Toole, Roddy Doyle and John Banville - The Bord Gais Energy Irish Book Awards 2013 held at the Doubletree Hilton Hotel. During the event, Sinead O'Connor had a run-in with photographers where she exchanged words, after she tried to avoid being photographed. - Dublin, Ireland - Tuesday 26th November 2013

Irish Book Awards 2013

Roddy Doyle - Guests arrive at the Bord Gais Energy Irish Book Awards 2013 at the Doubletree Hilton Hotel... - Dublin, Ireland - Tuesday 26th November 2013

Roddy Doyle's 'The Commitments,' A Raucous West End Debut Success


Roddy Doyle

The Commitments has premiered in London's West End, bringing a whirlwind of musical joy and vibrant staging to the nation's capital. Based on the 1987 novel by Irish writer Roddy Doyle, the story follows a group of unemployed youths who form a soul band, named The Commitments.


Continue reading: Roddy Doyle's 'The Commitments,' A Raucous West End Debut Success

Want To Know Why It Took 'The Commitments' 25 Years To Get To The West End?


Roddy Doyle Alan Parker The Commitments

The Commitments, the hugely successful and popular film by Sir Alan Parker based on the bestselling book the same name, is heading to the stage. The story of working-class Dubliners who form an unlikely soul band appears to be a perfect fit for the West End stage, and you'd be forgiven for assuming it's already a musical, so why has it taken some 25 years to get it there?

One huge reason is that writer Roddy Doyle thought he did not like musicals. "I'd never been to one," he said whilst announcing the show in London this week. The Booker prize-winning novelist said he'd had something of an epiphany when he began attending musicals once his children grew up. "I think the first was The Producers. It was quite a revelation because the film is terrific and I was wondering why would you want to do a musical? And actually it was great, it was very funny and sharp and you forgot about the film quite quickly," he told reporters at the announcement.

Continue reading: Want To Know Why It Took 'The Commitments' 25 Years To Get To The West End?

The Commitments To Be Brought To The Stage At Long Last!


Roddy Doyle

The Commitments, quite possibly one of the best British/Irish films in recent years, is being brought to the stage by it's creator Roddy Doyle a quarter of a century after it was first published in 1987. The story of protagonist Jimmy Rabbitte's efforts to create the greatest soul act Dublin has ever seen was made into a movie in 1991, with the idea of turning the story into a stage production long being an achievable possibility that is finally being realised.

The story, which won the Booker Prize when it was first published, follows a group of young, unemployed people living in the north side of the Irish capital who, under the influence and tutelage of their budding manager Rabbitte and a enigmatic old trumpetteer (Joey "The Lips" Fagan), decide to start a soul band. Speaking to BBC Radio 5, Doyle explained that the real reason why The Commitments was never made into a stage show was simply because he didn't like musicals. However, once he began to broaden his horizons and actually went to go see a musical, his opinion on the genre changed.

He said, "I think the first was The Producers. It was quite a revelation because the film is terrific and I was wondering why would you want to do a musical? And actually it was great, it was very funny and sharp and you forgot about the film quite quickly."

Continue reading: The Commitments To Be Brought To The Stage At Long Last!

Roddy Doyle Taking 'The Commitments: The Saviours Of Soul' To London's West End


Roddy Doyle

Inspired by the Franki Valli musical Jersey Boys, Roddy Doyle is taking a version of his book the Commitments to the West End stage, Sky News reports today (April 23, 2013). The book tells the tale of a group of working class Dubliners who form a soul band. The movie version of the story became a hit in 1991 and will be opening in London’s West End in October.

The cast will be comprised of young Irish actors but fans of the movie should not expect to see any of the original cast reprising any roles, or indeed taking on new ones, largely due to their age. “We're all mortal," the author joked. "And I think most of them accept the fact that they're lacking in hair." The Commitments: The Saviours Of Soul will open at the Palace Theatre in October. Doyle explained how seeing Jersey Boys made him change his mind about musical theatre; a genre he was previously not fond of. “What I loved about it was the songs were terrific,” explained the 54 year-old, “but the songs didn't interrupt the story and the story didn't interrupt the songs. That, above all others, nudged me in the direction I wanted to go.”

The soundtrack for the movie is still a work in progress, are there have reportedly been some issues regarding gaining the rights for some songs, though Doyle said they were “experimenting with which songs are right for the story.” 

Continue reading: Roddy Doyle Taking 'The Commitments: The Saviours Of Soul' To London's West End

When Brendan Met Trudy Review


Excellent
Harry, Sally: You've been replaced.

One of the liveliest comedies to come along in a decade, When Brendan Met Trudy is an imported riot that messes with the romantic comedy genre in such a way that it might never recover. And I mean that in a good way.

Continue reading: When Brendan Met Trudy Review

The Commitments Review


Good
Released in 1991, The Commitments was Alan Parker's third film about pop music. His first, Fame, was a frothy coming-of-age-musical that made the most of its youthful enthusiasm despite a disease-of-the-week-style script. The second, Pink Floyd: The Wall, was a depressive, insular, and angular pastiche of moody myth-making that was interesting mainly for people who fried their brains listening to "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" a hundred times too often. The Commitments sits somewhere in the middle: An engaging, open-hearted entertainment that pulls off two neat tricks. First, it's one of the few movies about rock-pop-soul music that seems to have the right idea about why and how bands come together, with some fine performances from rank amateurs. But more impressively, it finds some great humor in a setting that's defined by grinding poverty.

The setting is North Dublin, where Jimmy Rabbite (Robert Arkins) is trying to simultaneously shrug off his parents' bad taste and the dole-driven life that surrounds him. Jimmy carries a deep and abiding love for soul music of the pre-Motown era - Wilson Pickett, Jackie Wilson, and so on - though he understandably has a hard time convincing his friends and family that soul isn't an exclusively black music. In a video store, Jimmy plays old-school soul tapes to the unbelievers before uttering the film's funniest and most poignant line: "The Irish are the blacks of Europe. Dubliners are the blacks of Ireland. North Dubliners are the blacks of Dublin."

Continue reading: The Commitments Review

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