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Robin Tunney - The Mentalist, star, Robin Tunney grabs lunch in Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 17th August 2015

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Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney

Robin Tunney - The Mentalist star Robin Tunney goes shopping in Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 6th August 2015

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Robin Tunney
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Robin Tunney

Robin Tunney - Robin Tunney takes out her pet dog called Spinee for a walk - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 7th July 2015

Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney

Robin Tunney - Robin Tunney shopping at Thibiant Beverly Hills on Bedford Drive in Beverly Hills - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 12th March 2014

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Robin Tunney - CW, CBS and Showtime 2013 Summer TCA Party - Arrivals - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Monday 29th July 2013

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Robin Tunney

Simon Baker and Robin Tunney - Simon Baker is honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 14th February 2013

Simon Baker and Robin Tunney
Simon Baker, Hollywood Walk and Fame
Simon Baker, Hollywood Walk and Fame
Simon Baker and Naomi Watts
Simon Baker, Hollywood Walk and Fame
Simon Baker, Hollywood Walk and Fame

Robin Tunney Wednesday 3rd August 2011 CBS,The CW And Showtime TCA Party Beverly Hills, California

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Robin Tunney Wednesday 16th December 2009 out and about with a friend in Beverly Hills Los Angeles, California

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Robin Tunney

Robin Tunney Friday 13th November 2009 Prada book launch cocktail party held at the Prada store Beverly Hills Los Angeles, California

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Robin Tunney - Friday 17th April 2009 at Arclight Theater Los Angeles, California

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Robin Tunney

August Review


Weak
In Austin Chick's August, Josh Harnett is having a bad day. As pre-9/11 dot-com hotshot Tom Sterling, he's seen his parents and tech wonk brother treating him with contempt, the girl he's pining for giving him the brush-off, and his startup Internet company blowing up in his face. Drinking morosely at a bar (or as morosely as Hartnett can get) he lashes out at a fellow techie bandit who has just returned to the bar with a condemnatory, "Guys like you ain't got no vision, ain't got no passion, ain't got no soul." True enough. Tom is of course talking about himself but also, by extension, Hartnett's performance and Chick's film.

Chick's morality tale (a sort of insipid remake of Force of Evil except with techno sharks instead of gangsters) is all gloss and pizzazz but mostly pizz and no azz. August deals with two brothers, Tom and Josh (Adam Scott), who live large during the dot-com boom of '01, creating an in-the-moment start up called Landshark that is riding the top of the bubble with Joshua as the creative designer of the site and Tom as the obnoxious highfalutin promoter and resident SOB. Much like the World Wide Widget company in the satirical musical How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, there is no explanation given for what Landshark actually does; the company just is. But then it isn't. Soon after the opening credits and five months after its inception, the company is in the toilet and Tom is struggling to keep up the appearance of success for both the company and himself. But as in the Talking Heads song, they are both on the Road to Nowhere and somehow Tom has to come to grips with failure and regain his humanity, while looking out for his brother and his new family.

Continue reading: August Review

The Darwin Awards Review


Good
Poor Finn Taylor can't catch a break. By all reports he's the nicest guy in the world, and he typically toils for three or four years on each indie flick he directs. When they finally hit the screen they flop. His last outing, Cherish, was a bizarre story about a cop falling in love with a girl under house arrest who he's assigned to watch. I guess it wasn't bizarre enough, though. I had to reread my review of it just to fully remember what it was about. Cherish bombed with a $180,000 gross.

Four years later, Taylor drops another oddball flick on us, and the trouble is obvious before frame one. For starters, the name of the movie is The Darwin Awards, which sounds like it's going to be a documentary about those nutty people who kill themselves doing stupid things, thus earning posthumous "Darwin Awards" (as written up in a series of books of the same name) for ridding the gene pool of their DNA.

Continue reading: The Darwin Awards Review

Paparazzi Review


Bad
ATTENTION ASPIRING FILMMAKERS!!

Forget what those how-to screenplay books advise. The key to getting a screenplay sold is to find a pet peeve of Hollywood celebrities, and write a script where they get revenge on those behind the annoyance. A movie like this is now playing at a theater near us. Paparazzi tells the story of an up and coming actor (Cole Hauser) whose life is disrupted when some pesky shutterbugs won't leave him alone, nearly killing his wife and kid. So, naturally, the star starts killing the photographers.

Continue reading: Paparazzi Review

Hollywoodland Review


Weak

Who killed Superman?

George Reeves' death remains one of Hollywood's juiciest unsolved mysteries. After years spent clinging to the industry's fringe, the performer shot to stardom in 1952 when he hopped into Superman's red-and-blue tights for a Saturday-morning serial. The role made Reeves an overnight sensation, but also damaged any chances he had of becoming a serious actor.

Off camera, Reeves (Ben Affleck) reportedly wallowed in a directionless affair with Toni Mannix (Diane Lane), the two-timing wife of MGM executive E.J. Mannix (Bob Hoskins). Seven years after agreeing to play the Man of Steel, an unsatisfied Reeves was discovered shot to death in his Beverly Hills bedroom while his selfish fiancée, Leonore Lemmon (Robin Tunney), and a handful of strangers, partied downstairs.

Continue reading: Hollywoodland Review

The Secret Lives Of Dentists Review


Excellent
Can vomit be nominated Best Supporting Actor? Best Supporting Actress? Is puke gendered? Regardless, the stuff plays an essential role in The Secret Lives of Dentists. David Hurst (Campbell Scott) is emotionally sick with paranoia about whether his wife and fellow dentist Dana (Hope Davis) is having an affair. And then, he's quite literally sick, laid low with a case of the flu that spreads to Dana and his three young daughters over the course of five wearying, nauseous days. The stress and fear that takes hold of David in that time makes for the best movie about marital strife this side of American Beauty. However much director Alan Rudolph budgeted for creamed corn, it was worth every penny.

Dentists (adapted from Jane Smiley's novel The Age of Grief) opens with a brisk, gorgeously rendered sequence where David spies Dana being caressed lovingly by an unknown gentleman before she takes the stage in a small-town production of the opera Nabucco. As Verdi blares, David's mind swims. We rush through their romance in grainy flashbacks: Falling in love in dental school, starting a practice together, raising three daughters, and buying a weekend cabin in upstate New York. Scott, who's an expert at roles where he plays the well-meaning victim of circumstance, is excellent here. Subtly, he captures the way that wronged, anti-social people speak: Speaking a bit too loud to Dana, you can feel him studying her for evidence of sin. His eyes - and the camera - study her legs and the hem of her skirt, wondering what her sexual needs might be.

Continue reading: The Secret Lives Of Dentists Review

The Craft Review


Weak
A coven of outcast, teenage witches wreaks havoc at a high school.

Rarely have I been able to totally boil down the plot of a film so succinctly, but with The Craft, it's a piece of cake. What, no intricate subplots, you ask? No involved character development? No story progression from one act to the next?

Continue reading: The Craft Review

Empire Records Review


OK
"Don't let the Man get you down." That teen angst/rebellion catchphase that everybody understands but doesn't actually mean anything is Empire Records' most cherished line of dialogue, and it also nicely captures the film's theme: Rebellion is wonderful when it doesn't mean anything. Empire is not alone. A whole spat of teen films came out in the latter half of the 1990s, trying to represent the dissonant voice of the growing "alternative" movement (e.g. grunge, Nirvana, etc.): Reality Bites being the best example. But Empire manages overcome all the rest just by the sheer number of teen film tropes and stereotypes it is able to cram into one film.

What do you do when you discover that evil capitalists are secretly planning to turn the fun, laid back, quirky independent music store you work at into a "Music Town" (e.g. Music Warehouse, Tower Records, etc.)? Why you steal the nightly deposit and take it to Atlantic City, of course. Or so confused outsider Lukas (Rory Cochrane) assumes. But after an uninspired - both visually and luck-wise - trip to the craps table, Lukas is forced to return empty handed and face the music (pun intended). However, lucky Lukas has the coolest boss in the whole world, and they get together with the rest of the Empire Records crew to fix the money problem and keep the store's capitalist pig owner and the threat of Music Town at bay.

Continue reading: Empire Records Review

Paparazzi Review


Bad
ATTENTION ASPIRING FILMMAKERS!!

Forget what those how-to screenplay books advise. The key to getting a screenplay sold is to find a pet peeve of Hollywood celebrities, and write a script where they get revenge on those behind the annoyance. A movie like this is now playing at a theater near us. Paparazzi tells the story of an up and coming actor (Cole Hauser) whose life is disrupted when some pesky shutterbugs won't leave him alone, nearly killing his wife and kid. So, naturally, the star starts killing the photographers.

Continue reading: Paparazzi Review

Vertical Limit Review


Good
After suffering through an airline showing of The Perfect Storm, I could think of no better way to spend the evening than with another Man vs. Nature story in 2000's take on the genre, Vertical Limit.

As the thrill-packed trailer might already have cued you, this is an action-filled mountaineering movie, with Chris O'Donnell as Peter Garrett, the unlikely hero trying to save his stranded sister Annie (Robin Tunney) from certain death atop K2, the second-highest place on earth. How'd she get there? Glad you asked... three years after a family tragedy sends Annie on a perpetual climbing quest and Peter grounded on earth, the siblings meet up again at the base of K2, where a Texas billionaire (Bill Paxton) is ascending the peak as a publicity stunt with Annie in tow. Naturally, we learn you can't mess with Mother Nature for profit, and the climbing team ends up stuck in a crevasse only a few hundred feet from the summit -- beaten up, but alive. Barely.

Continue reading: Vertical Limit Review

The In-Laws (2003) Review


Excellent
Has Michael Douglas found The Fountain of Youth in Catherine Zeta-Jones? Since the Gordon Gekko days of Wall Street fame, his body is certainly a little less nimble, his face a little more wrinkled, and his hair a shade too light. But the guy looks great, and he's once again an action hero. That bumps him up from "silver spoon" to "ageless wonder" in the Hollywood classification book - ever closer to the royalty of perennial good lookers Redford and Basinger.

In The In-Laws (based on the 1979 film of the same name), like most other Michael Douglas vehicles, his gaunt face is rarely off the camera. Wisely, director Andrew Fleming inserts a hilarious Albert Brooks as the perfect remedy for Douglas's self-absorption.

Continue reading: The In-Laws (2003) Review

Supernova Review


Weak

If it weren't for the incessantly loquacious computer onboard the medical rescue vessel in the new terror-in-space flick "Supernova" -- a 1-900-voiced, femme fatale HAL that never shuts up for two minutes together -- this might not be a bad movie. I mean, for a picture MGM was too chicken to screen in advance for critics.

In fact, it's not even a horror movie, really -- even though that's how it's being marketed.

"Supernova" is a victim of "Sphere" syndrome, that terminal disease suffered by producers and directors who think if they can just get respectable, intelligent actors to star in their cheap sci-fi flick, the movie will instantly become something better than it is.

Continue reading: Supernova Review

End Of Days Review


Zero

By 10 minutes into "End of Days," this sorry Schwarzenegger-versus-Satan saga -- full of gratuitous gore-and-guns and contorted Christian mythology -- has already proved itself to be the most laughable entry yet in the recently fashionable, faith-based supernatural thriller genre.

The very first scene in "Days" is an unintentional riot as director Peter Hyams opens the film at the Vatican and manages, through exactly the wrong mix of menacing lighting and whispery Italian accents, to make the pontiff and his closest cardinals come across like Pope Don Corleone and bunch of mock-Scorsese mobsters.

It's 1979 and they've got their tunics in a twist because a comet is passing over the moon, signaling the birth of a girl who will become the object of Satan's lust on New Year's Eve 1999. If he manages to impregnate her, the armies of darkness will rule the world for 1,000 years, or something like that.

Continue reading: End Of Days Review

Cherish Review


Weak

Don't tell the other movie critics I said this, but once in a very great while I see an independent film I wish could have been a big budget Hollywood studio picture. Sometimes a good idea, a lot of enthusiasm and a shoestring budget just aren't enough.

Take "Cherish," for example. This creative but contrived and gimmick-driven comedy-thriller is about a geeky, socially inept young beauty (Robin Tunney), who is falsely accused of a hit-and-run and incarcerated in her own sparse and funky loft while awaiting trial, monitored by one of those electronic ankle bracelet programs.

Going stir-crazy because she's the kind of girl who can't stand to be alone (of men she says "I don't think I'd go out with so many if any one would call me back"), Tunney spends the movie trying to outwit the system that will set off an alarm at police headquarters if she wanders out of the bracelet's range.

Continue reading: Cherish Review

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Robin Tunney

Date of birth

19th June, 1972

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.62


Robin Tunney Movies

Passenger Side Movie Review

Passenger Side Movie Review

This road movie has a thoroughly indie tone: it's indulgent and cute and features a...

August Movie Review

August Movie Review

In Austin Chick's August, Josh Harnett is having a bad day. As pre-9/11 dot-com hotshot...

Hollywoodland Movie Review

Hollywoodland Movie Review

Who killed Superman?George Reeves' death remains one of Hollywood's juiciest unsolved mysteries. After years spent...

The In-Laws (2003) Movie Review

The In-Laws (2003) Movie Review

Has Michael Douglas found The Fountain of Youth in Catherine Zeta-Jones? Since the Gordon...

Paparazzi Movie Review

Paparazzi Movie Review

ATTENTION ASPIRING FILMMAKERS!!Forget what those how-to screenplay books advise. The key to getting a screenplay...

Hollywoodland Movie Review

Hollywoodland Movie Review

Who killed Superman?George Reeves' death remains one of Hollywood's juiciest unsolved mysteries. After years spent...

Supernova Movie Review

Supernova Movie Review

When near objects of immense gravity such as black holes, it is said that all...

Paparazzi Movie Review

Paparazzi Movie Review

ATTENTION ASPIRING FILMMAKERS!!Forget what those how-to screenplay books advise. The key to getting a screenplay...

Vertical Limit Movie Review

Vertical Limit Movie Review

After suffering through an airline showing of The Perfect Storm, I could think of no...

End Of Days Movie Review

End Of Days Movie Review

Here it is, November of 1999, and I thought we weren't going to get a...

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