Robin Tunney

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Robin Tunney takes out her pet dog for a walk

Robin Tunney - Robin Tunney takes out her pet dog for a walk - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 7th July 2015

Robin Tunney takes out her pet dog for a walk

Robin Tunney - Robin Tunney takes out her pet dog called Spinee for a walk - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 7th July 2015

Robin Tunney

Sony Remaking 1996 Cult Horror Movie 'The Craft'


The Craft Robin Tunney Fairuza Balk Neve Campbell Rachel True

The cult horror film, The Craft, is being remade by Sony. The reboot of the 1996 film, which was also distributed by Sony (under their Columbia banner), will have a brand new director but a few executives are reprising their roles for the upcoming project.

Neve CampbellNeve Campbell starred in the original movie.

Read More:  Neve Campbell Explains Why She Did Four Scream Movies.

Continue reading: Sony Remaking 1996 Cult Horror Movie 'The Craft'

Robin Tunney at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)

Robin Tunney - Robin Tunney at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 2nd February 2015

Robin Tunney

Robin Tunney Shopping At Thibiant Beverly Hills

Robin Tunney - Robin Tunney shopping at Thibiant Beverly Hills on Bedford Drive in Beverly Hills - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 12th March 2014

Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney

TV Guide Magazine Annual Hot List Party

Robin Tunney - TV Guide Magazine Annual Hot List Party Held at The Emerson Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Monday 4th November 2013

Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney

Video - Robin Tunney Falls For Photographer Prank


Actress Robin Tunney (The Mentalist; The Craft; End of Days) leaves a Medical building in Beverly Hills. She explains to photographers that her character in teen film The Craft was 'the good guy' who got into an unfortunate situation. She also falls for a trick pulled by one of the photographers: they told her that she'd dropped something so that she would bend down to pick it up. Thankfully, she took the joke in good grace and laughed it off.

Robin currently stars in The Mentalist as Teresa Lisbon

Passenger Side Review


Good
This road movie has a thoroughly indie tone: it's indulgent and cute and features a great soundtrack. It also has terrifically snarky dialog and a growing sense of mystery that keeps us gripped.

Michael (Scott) is annoyed when his ex-addict brother Tobey (Bissonnette) turns up on the morning of his birthday and asks him to drive him around for the day since his car has broken down. Tobey seems to have a vague mission, and he drags Michael with him on various errands and strange encounters around Los Angeles and out to Joshua Tree. It's like a scavenger hunt that's somehow related to Tobey's girlfriend Theresa (Tunney), a fellow ex-junkie who Michael doesn't want to talk about.

Continue reading: Passenger Side Review

August Review


Grim
In Austin Chick's August, Josh Harnett is having a bad day. As pre-9/11 dot-com hotshot Tom Sterling, he's seen his parents and tech wonk brother treating him with contempt, the girl he's pining for giving him the brush-off, and his startup Internet company blowing up in his face. Drinking morosely at a bar (or as morosely as Hartnett can get) he lashes out at a fellow techie bandit who has just returned to the bar with a condemnatory, "Guys like you ain't got no vision, ain't got no passion, ain't got no soul." True enough. Tom is of course talking about himself but also, by extension, Hartnett's performance and Chick's film.

Chick's morality tale (a sort of insipid remake of Force of Evil except with techno sharks instead of gangsters) is all gloss and pizzazz but mostly pizz and no azz. August deals with two brothers, Tom and Josh (Adam Scott), who live large during the dot-com boom of '01, creating an in-the-moment start up called Landshark that is riding the top of the bubble with Joshua as the creative designer of the site and Tom as the obnoxious highfalutin promoter and resident SOB. Much like the World Wide Widget company in the satirical musical How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, there is no explanation given for what Landshark actually does; the company just is. But then it isn't. Soon after the opening credits and five months after its inception, the company is in the toilet and Tom is struggling to keep up the appearance of success for both the company and himself. But as in the Talking Heads song, they are both on the Road to Nowhere and somehow Tom has to come to grips with failure and regain his humanity, while looking out for his brother and his new family.

Continue reading: August Review

The Darwin Awards Review


OK
Poor Finn Taylor can't catch a break. By all reports he's the nicest guy in the world, and he typically toils for three or four years on each indie flick he directs. When they finally hit the screen they flop. His last outing, Cherish, was a bizarre story about a cop falling in love with a girl under house arrest who he's assigned to watch. I guess it wasn't bizarre enough, though. I had to reread my review of it just to fully remember what it was about. Cherish bombed with a $180,000 gross.

Four years later, Taylor drops another oddball flick on us, and the trouble is obvious before frame one. For starters, the name of the movie is The Darwin Awards, which sounds like it's going to be a documentary about those nutty people who kill themselves doing stupid things, thus earning posthumous "Darwin Awards" (as written up in a series of books of the same name) for ridding the gene pool of their DNA.

Continue reading: The Darwin Awards Review

Hollywoodland Review


Grim
Who killed Superman?

George Reeves' death remains one of Hollywood's juiciest unsolved mysteries. After years spent clinging to the industry's fringe, the performer shot to stardom in 1952 when he hopped into Superman's red-and-blue tights for a Saturday-morning serial. The role made Reeves an overnight sensation, but also damaged any chances he had of becoming a serious actor.

Continue reading: Hollywoodland Review

The In-Laws (2003) Review


Excellent
Has Michael Douglas found The Fountain of Youth in Catherine Zeta-Jones? Since the Gordon Gekko days of Wall Street fame, his body is certainly a little less nimble, his face a little more wrinkled, and his hair a shade too light. But the guy looks great, and he's once again an action hero. That bumps him up from "silver spoon" to "ageless wonder" in the Hollywood classification book - ever closer to the royalty of perennial good lookers Redford and Basinger.

In The In-Laws (based on the 1979 film of the same name), like most other Michael Douglas vehicles, his gaunt face is rarely off the camera. Wisely, director Andrew Fleming inserts a hilarious Albert Brooks as the perfect remedy for Douglas's self-absorption.

Continue reading: The In-Laws (2003) Review

Paparazzi Review


Terrible
ATTENTION ASPIRING FILMMAKERS!!

Forget what those how-to screenplay books advise. The key to getting a screenplay sold is to find a pet peeve of Hollywood celebrities, and write a script where they get revenge on those behind the annoyance. A movie like this is now playing at a theater near us. Paparazzi tells the story of an up and coming actor (Cole Hauser) whose life is disrupted when some pesky shutterbugs won't leave him alone, nearly killing his wife and kid. So, naturally, the star starts killing the photographers.

Continue reading: Paparazzi Review

Hollywoodland Review


Grim

Who killed Superman?

George Reeves' death remains one of Hollywood's juiciest unsolved mysteries. After years spent clinging to the industry's fringe, the performer shot to stardom in 1952 when he hopped into Superman's red-and-blue tights for a Saturday-morning serial. The role made Reeves an overnight sensation, but also damaged any chances he had of becoming a serious actor.

Off camera, Reeves (Ben Affleck) reportedly wallowed in a directionless affair with Toni Mannix (Diane Lane), the two-timing wife of MGM executive E.J. Mannix (Bob Hoskins). Seven years after agreeing to play the Man of Steel, an unsatisfied Reeves was discovered shot to death in his Beverly Hills bedroom while his selfish fiancée, Leonore Lemmon (Robin Tunney), and a handful of strangers, partied downstairs.

Continue reading: Hollywoodland Review

The Secret Lives of Dentists Review


Excellent
Can vomit be nominated Best Supporting Actor? Best Supporting Actress? Is puke gendered? Regardless, the stuff plays an essential role in The Secret Lives of Dentists. David Hurst (Campbell Scott) is emotionally sick with paranoia about whether his wife and fellow dentist Dana (Hope Davis) is having an affair. And then, he's quite literally sick, laid low with a case of the flu that spreads to Dana and his three young daughters over the course of five wearying, nauseous days. The stress and fear that takes hold of David in that time makes for the best movie about marital strife this side of American Beauty. However much director Alan Rudolph budgeted for creamed corn, it was worth every penny.

Dentists (adapted from Jane Smiley's novel The Age of Grief) opens with a brisk, gorgeously rendered sequence where David spies Dana being caressed lovingly by an unknown gentleman before she takes the stage in a small-town production of the opera Nabucco. As Verdi blares, David's mind swims. We rush through their romance in grainy flashbacks: Falling in love in dental school, starting a practice together, raising three daughters, and buying a weekend cabin in upstate New York. Scott, who's an expert at roles where he plays the well-meaning victim of circumstance, is excellent here. Subtly, he captures the way that wronged, anti-social people speak: Speaking a bit too loud to Dana, you can feel him studying her for evidence of sin. His eyes - and the camera - study her legs and the hem of her skirt, wondering what her sexual needs might be.

Continue reading: The Secret Lives of Dentists Review

Robin Tunney

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