Robert Towne

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AMC Celebrates The Final 7 Episodes Of "Mad Men" With The Black & Red Ball

Robert Towne and Matthew Weiner - A host of stars were photogrpahed as they attended the AMC Celebration of The Mad Men 7 Episodes Of "Mad Men" With The Black & Red Ball. The event was held at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 26th March 2015

Robert Towne and Matthew Weiner
Robert Towne and Matthew Weiner

AMC Celebrates The Final 7 Episodes Of "Mad Men" With The Black & Red Ball - Red Carpet

Robert Towne - Celebirites attend the AMC celebration of the final 7 episodes of 'Mad Men' with the Black & Red Ball at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 26th March 2015

Robert Towne

LACMA and Warner Bros. present An Evening with Clint Eastwood held at the Los Angeles County Musuem of Art

Robert Towne and Clint Eastwood Wednesday 17th February 2010 LACMA and Warner Bros. present An Evening with Clint Eastwood held at the Los Angeles County Musuem of Art Los Angeles, California

LACMA and Warner Bros present An Evening with Clint Eastwood held at the Los Angeles County Musuem of Art

Robert Towne and Clint Eastwood LACMA and Warner Bros present An Evening with Clint Eastwood held at the Los Angeles County Musuem of Art Los Angeles, California

Robert Towne and Clint Eastwood

The Yakuza Review


OK
In 1974, the advertisements for Sidney Pollack's Americanized Japanese gangster movie The Yakuza stated, "A man doesn't forget. A man pays his debts." Well, not in today's economy. But in 1974 paying debts meant something else. It meant honor and obligation and a code of duty among hired killers and thugs. The Japanese yakuza action movie was a staple of Japanese cinema in the 1970s, the films packed with high energy, low budgets, and gratuitous violence. Pollack's westernized version of the genre tamps down the action and examines the yakuza film like an English literature grad student, looking for subtext as characters engage in slow and ponderous dialogues about honor and duty before they erupt and pull out swords and shotguns and turn rooms into abattoirs. Neither a Japanese nor an American action film nor really a philosophical discourse over tea and sushi, The Yakuza doesn't know what it wants to be.

Robert Mitchum plays Harry Kilmer, a retired detective, called back into service by old World War II army pal George Tanner (Brian Keith), who asks for his help in rescuing his daughter, who is being held in Japan by the yakuza. Tanner knows Kilmer is owed a debt of honor by ex-yakuza member Tanaka Ken (Ken Takakura, the big Japanese star of all those '70s yakuza films) and convinces him to travel back to Japan to see if Ken will honor his obligation to Kilmer by infiltrating the yakuza gang holding his daughter and bringing her back home (significantly, the daughter is no more than a unconscious blip on the radar in The Yakuza). Once there, events spin out of control, and Kilmer and Ken become embroiled in ritual obligations and mayhem.

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51st annual San Francisco International Film Festival Film Society Awards Night at the Westin St. Francis Hotel - Inside

Robert Towne and Warren Beatty - Robert Towne and Warren Beatty San Francisco, California - 51st annual San Francisco International Film Festival Film Society Awards Night at the Westin St. Francis Hotel - Inside Thursday 1st May 2008

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes Review


Grim
Ishtar, Hudson Hawk, and Heaven's Gate get all the ink, but Greystoke -- if there was any justice in the world -- would go down in history as one of cinema's great disasters.

Director Hugh Hudson had just finished Chariots of Fire, so why wouldn't he be perfect to direct the annual retelling of the Tarzan legend? Christopher Lambert -- hell, with that mop of a hairdo he looks a lot like Tarzan. Ralph Richardson and Ian Holm are excellent actors. How could this miss?

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Ask The Dust Review


Grim
If Robert Towne's Ask the Dust is the end result of 30 years of labor to bring John Fante's celebrated novel to the screen, it gravely calls into question Towne's current abilities as both a screenwriter and director. Towne's adaptation sheds no new interpretive light on Ask the Dust's literary legacy, and, even on its own terms, this is an anemic romance, undone by awkward performances and flat-footed filmmaking.

Twenty-year-old aspiring Italian-American writer Arturo Bandini, Fante's literary alter ego, is brash yet sensitive, fundamentally moral yet driven by an unquenchable, uniquely American thirst for love, lust, and romantic adventure. Bandini's conflicting values jolt and jostle inside him, finding expression primarily through Bandini's typewriter, as he tries to alchemize his experiences into fiction.

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Mission: Impossible 2 Review


OK
Editor's Note: Rarely have two so divergent reviews for one movie crossed my desk on the same day. To wit, we present a unique experience for filmcritic.com -- something of a "He Said, He Said" -- two looks at Mission: Impossible 2, from two of our most vocal critics. -CN

James Brundage, the exuberant fan:

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Mission: Impossible Review


Weak
You heard it here first: When big Mission: Impossible TV fans leave the theater after seeing the film version of their favorite TV show, the most common opinion will be, "I'm pissed off."

Telling you why would spoil what little plot Mission: Impossibleactually has, so I won't. Instead, let me try to shed a little light on what is a messy, uneven production that had so much promise but delivers so little.

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Shampoo Review


OK
Not to be confused with Hairspray, Shampoo is hardly a riot, but Warren Beatty's send-up of the sex comedy is worth a peek. The gag is that Beatty plays a Los Angeles hairdresser trying to manage his many, many women while attempting to raise funds to start his own salon. Oh, and it's 1968, on the even of Nixon's election as president, as the country made its sea change from permissiveness to, well, to whatever it was that Nixon stood for. (Adding insult to injury, the film came out right after Watergate.) Understandably, Shampoo is pretty hopeless in its datedness now. The jokes and characters are archetypes of America's most ridiculous era, which makes Shampoo serve better as a historical record than a timeless comedy.

Without Limits Review


Good
Stirring biopic about American runner Steve Prefontaine -- a precursor to today's most arrogant athletes. Replete with slow-motion running, sweat-dripping faces, and gut-wrentching drama, this is a must-see for any track & field fan.

The Two Jakes Review


Weak
Never willing to leave a classic alone, Hollywood finally dug up Chinatown and sequelized it with The Two Jakes, and they even let Jack Nicholson take the director's chair.

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Chinatown Review


Extraordinary
I do my homework. All right. So I don't always do my homework, but when it comes to film critiquing, I'm pretty good at doing my homework. So, since The Ninth Gate is being released later this week, I figured I should check out the Chinatown DVD, in order to get background on Roman Polanski's career.

Ain't homework painful?

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Days Of Thunder Review


Unbearable
Good God.

In Days of Thunder, Tom Cruise tries to do for NASCAR racing what he did for bartending in Cocktail. Which is to say: Nothing.

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Robert Towne

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