Robert Sean Leonard

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Fox's 'House' Series Finale Wrap Party at Cicada - Arrivals

Robert Sean Leonard - Robert Sean Leonard and Gabriella Salick Friday 20th April 2012 Fox's 'House' Series Finale Wrap Party at Cicada - Arrivals

Fox's 'House' Series Finale Wrap Party at Cicada - Arrivals

Peter Jacobson, Hugh Laurie, Jesse Spencer, Omar Epps and Robert Sean Leonard - Peter Jacobson, Omar Epps, Jesse Spencer, Odette Annable, Hugh Laurie, David Shore, Charlene Yi, Robert Sean Leonard Friday 20th April 2012 Fox's 'House' Series Finale Wrap Party at Cicada - Arrivals

Robert Sean Leonard and Nina Arianda

Robert Sean Leonard Sunday 24th April 2011 Robert Sean Leonard and Nina Arianda Opening night after party for the Broadway production of 'Born Yesterday' held at the Edison Ballroom. New York City, USA

Robert Sean Leonard and James Belushi

Robert Sean Leonard and Jim Belushi Sunday 24th April 2011 Robert Sean Leonard and James Belushi Opening night after party for the Broadway production of 'Born Yesterday' held at the Edison Ballroom. New York City, USA

Robert Sean Leonard and Jim Belushi

Tape Review


Terrible
While the film world awaits what sounds like a daring experiment from director Richard Linklater -- the animated Waking Life, coming in October -- the filmmaker attempts to hold us over with Tape, a failure of a low-budget project if ever there was one. The movie is shot on video and confined to a single motel room, for the entirety of its real-time, 84-minute length. With such restrictive parameters self-imposed on a feature, success really must lie in creative direction, acting power, and a solid screenplay. All three are non-existent here.

Tape is based on a play by Stephen Belber, and the playwright contributes the clunky script, full of obvious dialogue and silly posturing. With one strike already against them, the experienced, name cast (Hawke, Leonard, and Thurman) then take the problem a step further, apparently not realizing that performances need to be taken down a notch on video, as the medium tends to overexpose every movement and moment. (While Thurman's performance is good, the trio need to watch Brad Anderson's Session 9 for a good example of subtle acting on video.)

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The Manhattan Project Review


Excellent
What kid doesn't want to build a nuclear bomb? This fantastic journey follows a teen (Christopher Collet, long since retired from acting) as he discovers a plutonium skunkworks in his suburban backyard, proceeds to steal some of it, and build his own nuclear weapon to enter into the science fair. It's a wild ride and tons of fun, with comedy, genuine tension, and lots of geeky science fun. Highly underrated... watch especially for Cynthia Nixon as Collet's love interest -- about 15 years before she'd hit it big on Sex and the City, with a far, far worse haircut.

Dead Poets Society Review


Essential
A rare masterwork from Weir and Williams, about the triumphs and tragedies of a prep school teacher (Williams, who does his best work ever here) and his students. The best stories and performances, one of the greatest films of the 1980s and a rare classic that should be treasured.

Driven Review


OK
What better way to start an action movie than with... statistics!

From that rousing introduction we are thrown into the world of Driven, the highly anticipated CART-inspired movie that takes us on a whirlwind tour of made-up races.

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The I Inside Review


Grim
A hipster-wannabe ripoff of Jacob's Ladder with a terrible title, this senseless thriller has little going for it beyond the beautiful people that inhabit its hospital corridors. Not even Sarah Polley and Piper Perabo (reinventing herself as a femme fatale) can make this story of an amnesiac car-crash victim (Ryan Phillippe) worth sitting through. Of special note: The movie is based on a play with a much different title, one that actually gives away the surprise ending.

Chelsea Walls Review


OK
New York living is all about location. And where you live is often a sign of your lifestyle. If you live in Brooklyn, it is assumed you are more artistically inclined then, say, someone living in Queens (though this borough is making a comeback with its cheap rent). But the most notorious creative residence in all of New York has been the Chelsea Hotel, as far back as anyone can remember. Boasting such notable alumni as Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, and Bob Dylan, there is still a laidback, comfortably scrappy atmosphere about the place when you walk by.

Ethan Hawke (Training Day) courageously attempts to capture the essence of what makes this landmark so addictive in his directorial debut, Chelsea Walls. A collage of character plotlines that only barely intersect, Chelsea is a unique and respectable experiment in its focus on an inanimate object as its central character. Backed by a score that appropriately feels as if it were written while observing the production, Hawke creates an environment easily accessible to both New Yorkers and the non-initiated.

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Safe Passage Review


Good
Despite having a well-known and talented cast, including Susan Sarandon, Robert Sean Leonard, and Sam Shepard, this film was all but passed over when it came out in 1994. This can partly be attributed to its basic themes lacking in unique qualities. A bunch of kids from the same household that have their extreme quirks to distinguish them as an actual character come together in a time of crisis to forgive familial faults. Some of the interactions may also be a little too realistic when it comes to family connections so as not to be construed as "entertainment". However the performances in this simple family movie make up for the lack of creativity in its writing. It is a sentimental, easy-to-swallow emotional journey, and that it doesn't flare into heavy dramatics is worth some respect.

Susan Sarandon and Sam Shepard are the quirky and dysfunctional parents of eight brothers (played by Robert Sean Leonard, Sean Astin, etc). Sarandon is always packing and repacking and threatening to move out of the house with humorous melodrama while Shepard has constant headaches and moments of psychosomatic blindness that are caused by stress. One of the brothers is in the military and the film takes place during the time of the Gulf War. All of the family converges from various parts of the globe in order to be together, in wait for news of their brother/son, who is missing.

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Driven Review


Grim

The spirits of moderately better racing movies like "Grand Prix" and "Days of Thunder" are buried somewhere inside "Driven" -- buried under heaps of clich├ęs, stock characters, video game gimmickry, overly elaborate Ginsu editing, moronically contrived filler sequences, inadequate special effects and about four minutes of plot.

Set in the wound-up world of open-wheel racing, those four minutes go something like this: An irascible, crippled car owner (Burt Reynolds) hires a washed-up driver who once had a promising career (Sylvester Stallone) to help season an unfocused rookie boy-racer (Kip Pardue) so he can beat his rival (Til Schweiger), the reigning circuit champion.

Throw in a subplot in which Kip and Til (what's with these names?) vie for the affections of hottie-of-the-month (and former Sports Illustrated swimsuit model) Estella Warren and a few more sidelines about Sly's catty ex-wife (Gina Gershon) who married another racer (Cristian De La Fuente) and the pretty reporter (Stacy Edwards) he's dating now, and that pretty much takes care of everything except the racing.

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Tape Review


Grim

Another quickie guerrilla movie spawn of the digital video age, "Tape" is a real-time, three-character drama shot on the cheap in a hotel room by director Richard Linklater, who made such an awesome impact last month with the experimental animated philosophy daze of "Waking Life".

It's a movie that can work only if its characters hold you rapt for its entire run time -- and it might have done just that if said characters weren't so uniformly abrasive.

Ethan Hawke and Robert Sean Leonard play former high school buddies both in Lansing, Michigan, for a weekend. Leonard is there because he's an upstart filmmaker, convinced he's struggling for his art, whose first movie is playing the Lansing Film Festival. Hawke, a violent, drunk stoner with a chip on his shoulder, is ostensibly there as moral support, but in reality he has an entirely different agenda. He's never gotten over the fact that 10 years ago his high school girlfriend slept with Leonard. Now he has an ax to grind and a captive audience.

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Chelsea Walls Review


OK

For an actor directing his first movie, Ethan Hawke has remarkable patience and an intrinsic knack for creating personal, intimate, candid, lingering moments between well-drawn characters in "Chelsea Walls."

This film is composed of handful of interwoven vignettes about denizens, new and old, of New York's Chelsea Hotel -- a legendary (and now somewhat unkempt) residential haunt of artists, poets and other Bohemians for more than a century. It is a film in which body language and unspoken human intercourse play a much more important role than dialogue, which often reveals its meaning only through the context of a scene.

Adapted by Nicole Burdette from her own off-Broadway play of the same name, "Chelsea Walls" opens with a pair of cops arriving at the hotel to investigate a suicide, then the camera wanders into another room to discover a pair of lovers whose passionate but ill-starred relationship has run its course. A leathery, hard-living writer (Kris Kristofferson) is trying to gently dismiss an uptown woman (Natasha Richardson) who wishes she had the will power to stop visiting, of her own accord, the musty Chelsea apartment he keeps darkened with forever drawn shades to better cope with his chronic hangovers.

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Robert Sean Leonard

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