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Robert Redford Say That America Has Lost It's Way At Cannes Press Conference


Robert Redford Cannes Film Festival

Robert Redford used his press conference promoting new film, All Is Lost, at the Cannes Film Festival to address a different kind of lost; the loss of American values and its position as a respected industrial nation since the end of the Second World War.

The 76-year-old actor/writer/director was especially critical of the near-constant stream of political scandal that has plagued Capitol Hill since 1945, events that have caused average Americans and foreigners to shake their heads at Washington officials. Certain things have got lost," said Redford. "Our belief system had holes punched in it by scandals that occurred, whether it was Watergate, the quiz show scandal, or Iran-Contra; it's still going on…Beneath all the propaganda is a big grey area, another America that doesn't get any attention; I decided to make that the subject of my films."

Robert Redford
Robert Redford has long been known for his political activism

Continue reading: Robert Redford Say That America Has Lost It's Way At Cannes Press Conference

New CNN Series, Produced By Robert Redford, Will Explore The Culture And Development Of Chicago


Robert Redford

Robert Redford is to helm a documentary series about the city of Chicago, ordered by CNN. In Chicagoland, Redford will team up to with Laura Michalchyshyn and the already established filmmaking team of Marc Levin and Mark Benjamin to produce an eight part series, documenting the development of Chicago and the everyday decisions, faced by its mayor and his team.

According to CNN’s release, Chicagoland will capture “the riveting, real-life drama of a city looking to unite at this critical moment in the city’s history. In the aftermath of a countrywide economic collapse, Chicago faces the challenges of improving its public education system, and neighborhood and youth safety. Can the city’s leaders, communities, and residents come together in ways that expand opportunities and allow aspirations to be realized?”

Redford also expressed his excitement for the project in a statement of his own, praising the city and its mayor, Rahm Emanuel: “The vibrant culture and opportunities inherent in this 21st century, world-class city run alongside profound daily challenges. Much of it falls on the shoulders of its tough, visionary mayor, his team and people doing heroic work in neighborhoods throughout the city. Chicago has always had a rhythm all its own. It’s a city that wears its heart on its sleeve and I am honored to be a part of telling this story.”

Continue reading: New CNN Series, Produced By Robert Redford, Will Explore The Culture And Development Of Chicago

A Week In Movies: Iron Man 3 Goes Global, Thor: The Dark World Trailer Strikes And Emma Roberts Stuns In Blue


Robert Downey Jr Gwyneth Paltrow Chris Hemsworth Tom Hiddleston Ryan Reynolds Jeff Bridges Toni Collette Steve Carell Sam Rockwell Robert Redford Emma Roberts James Franco

Iron Man 3

The big news in cinemas globally is the release of Iron Man 3, which doesn't open in the USA until next week. But audiences around the world are already watching Robert Downey Jr and Gwyneth Paltrow reprise their roles in the Marvel franchise, which will no doubt lead box office charts everywhere for a few weeks at least.

Meanwhile, we got our first glimpse of Iron Man's fellow Avenger Thor with the trailer for The Dark World, which opens late this summer. Chris Hemsworth is back as the Norse god, this time teaming up with his mischievous brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) instead of fighting him. Natalie Portman is also back for what looks like a seriously epic blockbuster. 

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Iron Man 3 Goes Global, Thor: The Dark World Trailer Strikes And Emma Roberts Stuns In Blue

The Company You Keep Reviews, Robert Redford Returns To Form


Robert Redford Shia LaBeouf

Robert Redford and Shia LaBeouf star in The Company You Keep - A thriller based on a former Weather Underground activist who goes on the run after a journalist uncovers his true identity. Check out the trailer below and then read some of the choice reviews before its Friday 5th release date in the U.S.

The critical response so far has been decidedly average, but Redford has received great praise for what seems to be a return to form. “Robert Redford makes a welcome return to double-duty as director and lead actor in this clear-eyed drama about a former Weather Underground radical forced to reconcile with the past,” write The Hollywood Reporter. “There's something wonderfully reassuring about seeing Robert Redford back, directing and starring in a political thriller about the Weather Underground,” say The Movie Minute. TIME Magazine were one of the few to actually praise the film as a whole, saying, “With a welcome mixture of juice and grit, the movie dramatizes the lingering conundrums of young people in the time of the Vietnam morass."

Continue reading: The Company You Keep Reviews, Robert Redford Returns To Form

Prepare Yourself, Oscars 2014: Harvey Weinstein Just Bought 'Fruitvale'


Harvey Weinstein Robert Redford Michael B. Jordan

Harvey Weinstein's company spent around $2 million in acquiring the rights to the drama 'Fruitvale' following its screening at the Sundance Film Festival, according to a person close to the film who was not authorized to speak on record, reports the Los Angeles Times. The independent festival - founded by actor Robert Redford - is a hunting ground for Hollywood big-wigs searching for the next hit movie.

A couple of years ago, he snapped up The Details and My Idiot Brother at the festival, two independent movies that did well critically, though provided little commercially. However, The Weinstein company has plenty of room to take risks following successes in the form of The Kings Speech, The Reader, Inglorious Basterds, Django Unchained and David O Russell comedy, Silver Linings Playbook. The company's latest acquirement, Fruitvale, is based on the 2009 shooting of the 22-year-old African American father Oscar Grant by a BART police officer in Oakland, an event that sparked outrage among community activists. It stars the up-and-coming Michael B. Jordan in the lead role, best known for playing Wallace in HBO's critically acclaimed series The Wire, and as Vince Howard on Friday Night Lights. The movie is written and directed by Ryan Coogler and follows Grant in the 24 hours leading up to his death, during which he spends time with his family and decides to stop dealing marijuana. 

The acquisition comes hot on the heels of Relatively Media's purchase of Joseph Gordon-Levitt's sexual obsession story "Don Jon's Addiction" for around $4 million. The company is behind movies such as The Fighter, Dear John and the huge grossing Immortals.

Continue reading: Prepare Yourself, Oscars 2014: Harvey Weinstein Just Bought 'Fruitvale'

Buck Review


Excellent
Ostensibly a documentary about a real-life horse whisperer, this film actually has more to say about how people treat each other than how they interact with horses. It's a strikingly well-made film that entertains us while packing a quiet emotional kick.

Buck Brannaman travels around America running workshops to help people learn how to interact with their horses. His strikingly personal methods focus on establishing respect between horse and rider, with the understanding that both are just trying to do their best, even if both misbehave for whatever reason.

And Buck knows about these things from experience, growing up with a violently abusive father and a foster mother (Shirley) who taught him an earthy sense of compassion.

Continue reading: Buck Review

Ian Somerhalder, CNN, George Clooney, Larry King, Lenny Kravitz, Robert Redford and Sting Monday 21st June 2010 Los Angeles, California

Ian Somerhalder, Cnn, George Clooney, Larry King, Lenny Kravitz, Robert Redford and Sting
Chelsea Handler, Cnn, George Clooney, Ian Somerhalder, Larry King, Lenny Kravitz, Robert Redford and Sting
Nicole Richie, Cnn, George Clooney, Ian Somerhalder, Larry King, Lenny Kravitz, Robert Redford and Sting
Ne-yo, Cnn, George Clooney, Ian Somerhalder, Larry King, Lenny Kravitz, Robert Redford and Sting
Kesha, Cnn, George Clooney, Ian Somerhalder, Larry King, Lenny Kravitz, Robert Redford and Sting

Indecent Proposal Review


Weak
There are great erotic film experiences and wrenching emotional film experiences. Indecent Proposal tries awkwardly to be both and ends up as neither. Perhaps, with a premise so salaciously bent on hidden desires, the filmmakers thought a maudlin tale of deep love would be the perfect counterbalance. Instead, the film is an uneasy mixture of overwrought soap opera and softcore eroticism. The soap opera outweighs the eroticism and drowns the movie, but even the awkwardly placed sex scenes are so heavy-handed they can't keep things afloat. Here is a movie simultaneously preoccupied with getting viewers hot and bothered and manipulating them into ambivalent emotional turmoil. The combination is not very arousing.

The zesty, scandalous plot device at the center of the film and the sole reason the movie became a fairly big hit in 1993 can be summed up in one line: "Suppose... I were to offer you one million dollars for one night with your wife." And yes, that surface exposition is intriguing in its glossy, high-concept way. But in truth, the appeal of that tantalizing conundrum gets lost in a muddle of a screenplay that really is not about that spicy million-dollar offer, but rather a tepid, long-winded story of a relationship tested by temptation. In theory, the material could work. In practice, Indecent Proposal is a bland, melodramatic sit.

Continue reading: Indecent Proposal Review

Robert Redford and Paul Newman Monday 8th June 2009 The celebration of Paul Newman's Hole in the Wall Camps in Avery Fisher hall at Lincoln Center - departures New York City, USA

Three Days Of The Condor Review


Very Good
In Sydney Pollack's strange spy thriller Three Days of the Condor, Robert Redford plays a playful and somewhat geeky analyst for the C.I.A. He spends his days reading books, journals, and any manner of written correspondence that is published or publicly available, searching for codes, keywords, and country names to cross-reference with Langley. He has a code name, Condor, which he has no particular use for until the day he returns from a lunch run to find his entire department murdered. Suddenly, he is on the lam, indulging in ramshackle espionage plots and rubbing elbows with foreign assassins. He's not a spy but he plays one pretty well.

Unlike the Condor, the viewer may only pick up the salient points. There's a smattering of names for several chiefs and directors: Wicks, Wabash, Atwood, Higgins, etc. Even the switchboard operator is given the title "The Major." There's a woman, Catherine Hale (Faye Dunaway), whom the Condor takes hostage and quickly embarks on a semi-romantic partnership with. When he's not busy connecting the dots, the Condor is being hunted by a tall gun-for-hire with a foreign accent given the codename Joubert (the indefatigable Max Von Sydow) and another assassin named simply The Mailman. It doesn't seem to matter much but, for what it's worth, it all seems to have something to do with a possible war in the Middle East and oil.

Continue reading: Three Days Of The Condor Review

Sibylle Szaggars and Robert Redford - Sibylle Szaggars, Robert Redford, Nancy Ganis, Sid Ganis San Francisco, California - 52nd San Francisco International film festival held at Westin St. Francis hotel Thursday 30th April 2009

Sibylle Szaggars and Robert Redford
George Lucas and Robert Redford
George Lucas and Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford and Maurice Kanbar

Robert Redford Monday 16th March 2009 The 2009

Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford, Rachel Robinson, Dr Benjamin Carson and Robin Robinson
Shelia Johnson and Robert Redford

Robert Redford - Saturday 17th January 2009 at Sundance Film Festival Park City, Utah

Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford

Paul Newman, Cassidy, Joanne Woodward, Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid and Robert Redford at Cannes Film Festival

Paul Newman, Cassidy, Joanne Woodward, Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid and Robert Redford
Paul Newman
Paul Newman
Paul Newman
Paul Newman
Paul Newman

Robert Redford Robert Redford at the World Mobile Congress, held in Barcelona, promoting the Sundance Channel and making available short films and other media content for the mobile industry., Robert Redford at the World Mobile Congress, held in Barcelona, promoting the Sundance Channel and making available short films and other media content for the mobile industry.

Robert Redford

Robert Redford Wednesday 13th February 2008 at the World Mobile Congress, held in Barcelona promoting the Sundance Channel, marketing short films and other media content for the mobile industry. Barcelona, Spain

Robert Redford
Robert Redford and Isabella Rossellini
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford

Robert Redford Wednesday 13th February 2008 speaking at the GSMA Mobile Backstage event during the GSMA Mobile World Congress, Barcelona, Spain

Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford

Lions For Lambs Review


Weak
Lions for Lambs is an op-ed piece masquerading as a motion picture, a candid and cynical lecture series that indicts any institution remotely connected to the ongoing Iraqi conflict. The sentiments expressed should trigger discussions, but they don't add up to an interesting movie.

Earlier this year, screenwriter Matthew Michael Carnahan pressed similar buttons with his Middle East muscle thriller The Kingdom. He uses his current pulpit to chastise the Bush administration for blindly leading America into a winless war; the national media for blindly following our leaders in the weeks, months, and years following September 11; and Generation Y for retreating to its PlayStation consoles as opposed to penning protest letters to local politicians.

Continue reading: Lions For Lambs Review

Robert Redford Sunday 4th November 2007 at the 'Lions For Lambs' screening at the MOMA New York City, USA

Robert Redford
Robert Redford

Meryl Streep and Robert Redford - Meryl Streep and Robert Redford Hollywood, California - AFI FEST 2007 Opening Night Gala Presentation of 'Lions For Lambs' held at Arclight Cinerama Dome - Arrivals Thursday 1st November 2007

Meryl Streep and Robert Redford
Meryl Streep and Robert Redford

Robert Redford - Thursday 25th October 2007 at Tempelhof Airport Berlin, Germany

Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford

Robert Redford - Monday 22nd October 2007 at The Ivy London London, England

Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford
Robert Redford

The Natural Review


Good
Robert Redford is beloved for his roles in numerous films, but his work in The Natural has to rank as one of the few on top, despite the fact that, with a $48 million box office, it hardly ranks as one of his bigger hits.

The film remains, next to Field of Dreams, one of the world's oddest baseball movies. Roy Hobbs (Redford) is a child wunderkind at the game. After playing some ball at a carnival, he's summarily shot in the chest by a femme fatale (Barbara Hershey), who is clearly working for agents that want him not to be the greatest player of all time, which Hobbs says he aims to be.

Continue reading: The Natural Review

The Sting Review


Extraordinary
It's one of cinema's most beloved heist movies, and for good reason: The Sting is balls-out fun from start to finish, a showstopper work for both Robert Redford and Paul Newman, and alternately funny and thrilling.

The plot must have been devilishly complex at the time. In more recent years we've had films like House of Games and The Spanish Prisoner that make The Sting's intricacies look like a story in a first-grader's textbook. It's the Depression, and Johnny Hooker (Redford) makes a living running quickie cons on the street. When he scams several thousand dollars off of a mob guy, the heat comes down from both the mafiosos looking for their money and the crooked cops, culminating in Hooker's partner getting killed and Hooker escaping the city for hopefully better climes.

Continue reading: The Sting Review

An Unfinished Life Review


OK
We never meet Griff Gilkyson - he's shown in outdated photographs and discussed frequently - though his memory rages in the hearts of three emotionally damaged characters. His death is the reason director Lasse Hallström titled his latest drama An Unfinished Life.

Griff's pregnant wife, Jean (Jenifer Lopez), was behind the wheel the night the couple's car flipped six times. Griff's father, Einar (Robert Redford), crawled into the nearest liquor bottle to mourn his dead son and has yet to forgive Jean for an accident she'd give anything to take back. The couple's daughter, now 11 and also named Griff (Becca Gardner), wants to know her late father so she's able to properly miss him.

Continue reading: An Unfinished Life Review

Charlotte's Web (2006) Review


Good
That's sooooooooooooooooome Dakota Fanning!

It's only a mild heresy to turn a beloved children's book and animated film into a star vehicle for the wee Miss Fanning, the go-to child actress who has become Hollywood's only A-list star under the age of 13. The only real surprise is that she doesn't have her own production company yet.

Continue reading: Charlotte's Web (2006) Review

Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid Review


Essential
Calling Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid a great Western is like calling Dom Perignon a really great bottle of grape juice. Yeah, that's correct, but you're missing the point entirely.

Butch and Sundance is more than a Western: It's an iconic, American experience, a classic adventure tale, and a singular slice of late-'60s moviemaking that has never really been repeated. The story is a surprisingly, "mostly" accurate tale of two of history's best-known outlaws. The film comprises two major sequences: First, the duo robs a series of trains on the frontier, then spends a lengthy amount of time on the run from the hired guns the railroad is paying to hunt them down. The heat gets so severe that it leads them to the second sequence: Self-imposed exile to dingy Bolivia, where they rob banks instead, only to have the federales try to hunt them down. The final moments of the film are unforgettable.

Continue reading: Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid Review

The Milagro Beanfield War Review


Excellent
Who'd of thought that a battle over water rights would make for such an interesting tale? This small movie, Robert Redford's second directorial endeavor after Ordinary People, is surprisingly watchable and gripping, despite a terrible title and a setup that would have mainstream audiences running for the exits. In a tiny New Mexico town, a huge resort development is getting underway, and the locals are getting trampled underfoot. But not Joe Mondragon (Chick Vennera, the spitting image of Bruno Kirby), who diverts water from the resort project onto his small bean field. Naturally, the titular war develops: Corporate America vs. the little guy -- with the media thrown in for a kick. Surprisingly lively stuff, full of local character, fun performances, and a plot that builds up steam faster than you'd think. It's Jean de Florette, Western style, and the kind of movie John Sayles wishes he could make.

Quiz Show Review


Very Good
People have tried to peg the "end of American innocence" on all sorts of things -- Vietnam, Watergate, the nuclear arms race -- but Robert Redford is, I believe, the first and only person to blame the decline of western civilization on the 21 game show scandal of the 1950s. But there you have it: A curious incident from the past -- and an inevitability, really -- in which upstanding blueblood Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes in a very memorable role) gets caught up in a fixed game show, bringing the show and its producers (but ultimately, no one else) to its knees. Strangely, for such a buildup -- and Redford manages to build quite a snowball of drama in all of this, full of heroes and antiheroes -- the payoff is a real letdown. America survived the quiz show scandals, and trying to overblow the impact of what amounts to a novelty investigation rings a little bit false.

A Bridge Too Far Review


Good
There are star-studded projects, and then there's A Bridge Too Far, a World War II movie the likes of which would cost upwards of $300 million to make today. There are lots of bridges in the film, actually: The Allies aim to capture a series of them in German-occupied Holland as part of Operation Market-Garden, a byzantine plot that would theoretically cripple the German war machine in western Europe, where Germany is already on the run. However, Allied mistakes and an unexpected amount of German firepower nip the plan in the bud. The film is more a showcase for some searing acting -- and at three hours long, there's plenty of it -- than it is a classic war film. The battle scenes just don't come across as impressively as in other films of the era -- the fact that VW Beetles with plastic tank shells on them were used in lieu of some of the Panzers is just one sign that all the budget went to that exhaustive cast list.

An Unfinished Life Review


OK
We never meet Griff Gilkyson - he's shown in outdated photographs and discussed frequently - though his memory rages in the hearts of three emotionally damaged characters. His death is the reason director Lasse Hallström titled his latest drama An Unfinished Life.

Griff's pregnant wife, Jean (Jenifer Lopez), was behind the wheel the night the couple's car flipped six times. Griff's father, Einar (Robert Redford), crawled into the nearest liquor bottle to mourn his dead son and has yet to forgive Jean for an accident she'd give anything to take back. The couple's daughter, now 11 and also named Griff (Becca Gardner), wants to know her late father so she's able to properly miss him.

Continue reading: An Unfinished Life Review

Up Close And Personal Review


Good
If nothing else, Up Close And Personal will remind you just how hideous the hairstyles of the 1980s were, especially among media personalities. Fortunately, the film accomplishes a lot more than that, giving us a nice romance that isn't harmed too much by its attempts at melodrama.

Up Close And Personal tells the loosely-based-on-reality story of Sally (who becomes Tally) Atwater (Michelle Pfeiffer), a vain upstart girl from Reno who wants to make it big in television. Robert Redford costars as Warren Justice, a Miami news director who gives her her big break and takes her under his wing. Under his influence, Tally is transformed from brash loudmouth to The Next Big Thing, and of course, the two fall madly in love along the way.

Continue reading: Up Close And Personal Review

The Last Castle Review


Good
After critic-turned-filmmaker Rod Lurie's pitiful attempt at a White House drama (and I use that word loosely) with last year's The Contender, Lurie provides a bit of redemption with The Last Castle, a semi-decent drama set in a tough-as-nails military prison.

Robert Redford, in his first acting role since 1998's The Horse Whisperer, plays venerable three-star General and war hero Eugene Irwin, a soldier who quickly pleads guilty in his court martial, resulting in a ten year sentence to an unnamed military prison. When hearing of Irwin's impending arrival, head warden Colonel Winter (James Gandolfini) is astounded, saying they should be naming a base after the guy, not locking him up for a decade.

Continue reading: The Last Castle Review

A Civil Action Review


Very Good
The best actor nominees for the 1998 Academy Awards will probably be Jim Carrey, Tom Hanks, Ian McKellan, Nick Nolte and a wild card. Edward Norton or Jeff Bridges should fill this wild card (for American History X and The Big Lebowski) but that won't happen. Instead, take a look at John Travolta in A Civil Action.

Travolta plays personal injury lawyer Jan Schlichtmann, a greedy bloodsucker of a lawyer (not a new concept but still a fun one) who in his first scene is heard talking about which is better, a dead black or a dead white. A dead cripple or a dead child? He gives that voice over with such a subtle coldness that you know you're in for a good story.

Continue reading: A Civil Action Review

The Way We Were Review


Weak
Robert Redford and Barbra Streisand star in a multi-year romantic drama that comes off as about as believable as a love affair between myself and a potted plant. Widely loathed for its sacharrine approach (and Streisand's acting), the shrill Ms. Babs is so unsympathetic as the local communist sympathiser that you can't help but be aghast in wonder over why Redford's character would possibly see anything in her. Of course, this film had a popular song come from it (see if you can guess what it was, Einstein), and a legion of Babs fans believe their goddess can do no wrong, so, for better or worse, The Way We Were is going to be with us as a "classic" romance for some time to come.

The Legend Of Bagger Vance Review


Excellent
Robert Redford's singular devotion to American mythology continues in The Legend of Bagger Vance, the story of a golfer who's lost his swing and the caddy who brings it back to him. "Inside each and every one of us," says Vance (Smith), "is our one true, authentic swing." It's a metaphor intended to apply to all walks of life, on the fairway or otherwise. If oversweet metaphors like this are your bag, then you're really going to like Bagger Vance.

The story opens in the present with an aged Hardy Greaves (Jack Lemmon) suffering a heart attack on a golf course. As he lies quietly smiling to himself, he muses on the frequency of his cardiovascular failures and his love of the game of golf, which meanders into a quixotic narration on the career of Rannulph Junuh (Damon). Soon the narrative fades to the past and we see Junuh at the height of his career, in the company of the enchanting Adele Invergordon (played by Charlize Theron of The Devil's Advocate fame; who, by the way, happens to represent the purest embodiment of good, wholesome sex that the film industry has to offer).

Continue reading: The Legend Of Bagger Vance Review

The Clearing Review


Very Good
There's tension in them there trees, and hopefully some cash for Fox Searchlight in the form of counter-programming. Surrounded by a sea of summer popcorn escapist vehicles, the rock-solid kidnapping thriller The Clearing feels like a frigid and somber snowball dropped into the heart of the Arabian Desert. We're typically not trained to accept weighty emotional dramas in the dog days of July, though when one this good rolls through, let's hope it has a better survival rate than said lump of frost.

The adult-oriented character piece delves headfirst into the natural landscapes of the Southeast - primarily Georgia and North Carolina - to hide the criminal wrongdoings of kidnapper Arnold Mack (Willem Dafoe) and his valuable target, Wayne Hayes (Robert Redford). While the men work their way to an undisclosed location in the woods, Clearing continues to focus on the consequent people affected by the impromptu abduction - from Wayne's wife, Eileen (Helen Mirren), and their children (Alessandro Nivola, Melissa Sagemiller) to the businessman's mistress (Wendy Crewson).

Continue reading: The Clearing Review

The Candidate Review


Extraordinary
"Politics is bullshit."

Such sentiment, spoken early in the film, sums up The Candidate's position on politics, not to mention my own. Robert Redford plays the title role, a fresh-faced kid and son of a former governer goaded by a group of campaign strategists (namely Peter Boyle) into running against an "unbeatable" Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate. With nothing to lose, he starts off by running the campaign by his conscience and the seat of his pants, but eventually it all gets away from him as the machine takes over. Much like Network, this satire on an American institution continues to gain relevance instead of lose it. The scene of Redford finally losing his mind stands as one of cinema's most classic moments. Plenty of one-liner gems only add to the majesty of the film.

The Sting Review


Extraordinary
It's one of cinema's most beloved heist movies, and for good reason: The Sting is balls-out fun from start to finish, a showstopper work for both Robert Redford and Paul Newman, and alternately funny and thrilling.

The plot must have been devilishly complex at the time. In more recent years we've had films like House of Games and The Spanish Prisoner that make The Sting's intricacies look like a story in a first-grader's textbook. It's the Depression, and Johnny Hooker (Redford) makes a living running quickie cons on the street. When he scams several thousand dollars off of a mob guy, the heat comes down from both the mafiosos looking for their money and the crooked cops, culminating in Hooker's partner getting killed and Hooker escaping the city for hopefully better climes.

Continue reading: The Sting Review

Sacred Planet Review


Good
It's pitiful to say it, but most Americans would rather blow a thousand dollars in Las Vegas than see the magnificence of coastal Alaska. Sacred Planet is a film to inspire us to leave the all-you-can-eat buffets, the shopping malls, and the dog tracks, and see the world's remaining wild places. It's a film designed to shake us from the urban jungles we've grown secure in and broaden our view, culturally as well as spiritually, through interaction with the splendor of nature. And it almost works.

There is, indelibly, a hint of New Age in Sacred Planet, the latest IMAX documentary film to be released to DVD. The producers play it up in the advertising, the tribal font of the title, the narration by Robert Redford, the world music score. Like Baraka and Koyaanisqatsi before it, Sacred Planet is a film designed to both transport us somewhere and teach us something. And the lesson is the same: we live in an interconnected world. However, unlike Baraka and Koyaanisqatsi, Sacred Planet demands very little from the audience.

Continue reading: Sacred Planet Review

Brubaker Review


OK
Full of gushing late-1970s idealism, Brubaker cuts a portrait of Henry Brubaker, a real-life prison reformer who uncovered a little nastiness in a southern prison system. Robert Redford is memorable in the titular role, but the melodramatics are a bit much to wade through at times. Watch also for a young Morgan Freeman, nearly unrecognizable.

All The President's Men Review


Extraordinary
Classic collaboration of Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, and Richard Nixon, in the most scandalous political tale of our time -- Nixon's destruction after Watergate. (Sorry, Michael Moore!) The leads put human faces on the cold visages of Woodward and Bernstein, and more than any other movie about journalism, All the President's Men tells it like it is. (Well, was anyway -- check out Shattered Glass for a more up-to-date scenario.)

Jeremiah Johnson Review


Very Good
Robert Redford shines as a mid-1800s man fed up with society and who heads to wild Colorado to become a real-life mountain man. Ending up with an Indian wife that doesn't speak English and a kid who doesn't speak at all, Johnson seemingly has nothing but bad times, and ends up being hunted by Crow Indians. Marvel as Redford's beard grows like crazy, but his hair does not. A very entertaining film that doesn't flinch about how tough life was for the early settlers.

The Horse Whisperer Review


Weak
An atrocity in the grand history of films like The Bridges of Madison County. This is yet another grown-up romance, overblown, sappy, sentimental, and just plain stupid -- featuring Redford as a guy who is strangely in tune with horsies. Yee haw! Turn off your brain before you watch it.

The Electric Horseman Review


Good
Modern viewers will notice that the beginning of The Last Samurai is identical to that of The Electric Horseman. Though Cruise is a war hero stumping for a rifle company, Redford is a rodeo star now reduced to that of pitchman for a cowboy breakfast cereal, not to mention a dysfunctional drunk. Redford's Sonny finally grows a conscience and a soul, though, when he's asked to perform with a retired race horse on a Las Vegas stage. He promptly horse-naps the stallion, and escapes into the Vegas desert, with reporter girl Jane Fonda hot on his tail (though the cops can't find the guy).The middle is heavy on romance between the two stars -- both megawatt powers in 1979 -- but the central plot, about a stolen horse for God's sake! -- doesn't carry the weight director Sydney Pollack might like us to believe.

Out Of Africa Review


Excellent
She had a farm in Africa, at the foot of the Ngong Hills. Meryl Streep trots out a classic performance in this 1985 Oscar-winner about Isak Dineson/Karen Blixen, a writer who lived in Africa for a short time and experienced all manner of adventure and heartache, dutifully recorded in this Sydney Pollack epic. Works well as a stepping stone between Lawrence of Arabia and The English Patient, if you can ignore the awful bluescreening.

An Unfinished Life Review


OK

Another sleepy, sweeping soft-serve melodrama from director Lasse Hallstrom ("The Shipping News," "Chocolat," "Cider House Rules"), "An Unfinished Life" stars Robert Redford as a grizzly Wyoming rancher who resentfully takes in his long-estranged, widowed daughter-in-law (Jennifer Lopez) when she reluctantly turns up seeking shelter from an abusive boyfriend.

Still bitterly nursing the loss of his son some 11 years ago in a car accident for which Einer (Redford) blames Jean (Lopez), the unfriendly ol' cuss becomes even more surly when introduced to Griff (Becca Gardner), an attentive, 11-year-old tomboy granddaughter he never knew he had.

Emotionally credible and transportingly photographed, it's a film that wears its out-sized metaphors well (Redford and the girl bond over freeing a recently captured bear he'd previously tried to kill). But structurally it's so lacking in imagination (suppose Lopez will fall for the handsome, strong but non-threatening sheriff played by Josh Lucas?) that the story arc seems to have been drawn on graph paper rather than written in a script.

Continue reading: An Unfinished Life Review

Spy Game Review


Good

Plied with borderline-implausible layers of CIA subterfuge and ensconced in director Tony Scott's flashy, superficial visual assault style of ostentatious MTV filmmaking, "Spy Game" is an intrigue-and-action thriller that takes you on a great ride while not really being a great movie.

Like a turbo-charged Tom Clancey adaptation, much of the film takes place inside the hallways, offices and conference rooms of CIA headquarters, circa 1991. But since Scott is a purveyor of short attention span fare, every scene is punched up to a distracting extent with circling cameras, quick edits, black-and-white freeze-frames and other cinematic amphetamines.

However, the picture is grounded by the calm, confident, sly performance of Robert Redford, starring as a veteran spook-wrangler forced to audaciously outfox his own agency to bring a man back alive.

Continue reading: Spy Game Review

Robert Redford

Robert Redford Quick Links

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Robert Redford

Date of birth

18th August, 1936

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.79


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Robert Redford Movies

Pete's Dragon Movie Review

Pete's Dragon Movie Review

This hugely enjoyable adventure is a loose remake of the 1977 Disney hit that blended...

Truth Movie Review

Truth Movie Review

That generic title obscures a surprisingly complex exploration of the real-life events surrounding the fall...

Pete's Dragon - Teaser Trailer

Pete's Dragon - Teaser Trailer

Pete is a young boy who lives in the forest, not many little boys would...

Truth Trailer

Truth Trailer

Mary Mapes is the producer of CBS' '60 Minutes' and, in the run up to...

A Walk in the Woods Movie Review

A Walk in the Woods Movie Review

Echoing his witty writing style, Bill Bryson's memoir of his trek up the Appalachian Trail...

A Walk in The Woods Trailer

A Walk in The Woods Trailer

Bill Bryson has been living in the UK with his English wife for a long...

Captain America: The Winter Soldier Movie Review

Captain America: The Winter Soldier Movie Review

This is the Marvel movie that divides the fans from the casual filmgoers, as the...

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Captain America: The Winter Solider Trailer

Captain America: The Winter Solider Trailer

Steve Rogers has awoken after a deep sleep lasting 70 years following his fight with...

All Is Lost Movie Review

All Is Lost Movie Review

After the award-winning Margin Call, writer-director J.C. Chandor shifts gears completely for this fiercely detailed...

Captain America: The Winter Soldier Trailer

Captain America: The Winter Soldier Trailer

Following events during World War II and his confrontation with Nazi adversary the Red Skull,...

All Is Lost Trailer

All Is Lost Trailer

A veteran mariner makes a brave voyage into the Indian Ocean on his large yacht,...

All Is Lost Trailer

All Is Lost Trailer

When an aging mariner takes to the Indian Ocean on his yacht on a solitary...

The Company You Keep Trailer

The Company You Keep Trailer

Ben Shepard is a young and ambitious reporter determined to make a name for himself...

Buck Movie Review

Buck Movie Review

Ostensibly a documentary about a real-life horse whisperer, this film actually has more to say...

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