Robert Klein

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Opening night of 'The Heidi Chronicles' - Arrivals

Jamie deRoy and Robert Klein - Shots of a host of stars as they arrived to the Opening night of The Heidi Chronicles which was held at the Music Box Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 19th March 2015

Jamie deRoy and Robert Klein

Late Show with David Letterman

Robert Klein - Celebrities outside the Ed Sullivan Theater for 'Late Show with David Letterman' at Ed Sullivan Theater - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 11th December 2014

Robert Klein
Robert Klein
Robert Klein

Garden of Laughs Benefit presented by MSG

Robert Klein - Garden of Laughs Benefit presented by MSG New York City NY United States Saturday 26th January 2013

Robert Klein and John Starks
Robert Klein and Adam Ferrara

Robert Klein attending the Memorial to honor Marvin Hamlisch, held at the Peter Jay Sharp Theater at Julliard School. New York City, USA

Robert Klein, Memorial, Marvin Hamlisch, Peter Jay Sharp Theater, Julliard School. New York and City Tuesday 18th September 2012 Robert Klein attending the Memorial to honor Marvin Hamlisch, held at the Peter Jay Sharp Theater at Julliard School. New York City, USA

The Back-up Plan Review


OK
As far as romantic comedies go, this is just about watchable. Even though it's both silly and sappy, it has a vaguely realistic tone that lets us identify with the characters. Even if the romance falls flat, the romance is sweet.

Zoe (Lopez) is a busy but single New Yorker desperate to have a child, so she heads to the sperm bank. After her doctor (Klein) helps her conceive, even a clash with an annoying stranger, Stan (O'Loughlin), can't ruin her day. Of course, she runs into him again, and this time notices that he's both annoying and drop-dead gorgeous. So how will he react when he finds out that Zoe is pregnant?

Continue reading: The Back-up Plan Review

Two Weeks Notice Review


Good
After starring in just a few comedies, Sandra Bullock has established herself as the go-to actress to play the loopy, disheveled, well-intentioned woman of today. Her characters may possess poise and beauty, but they're hidden beneath the exterior of a girl who prefers chili dogs and wiping her nose on her sleeve. Although the gimmick may be a little stale, Bullock continues to play the hell out of it, as she does with co-star Hugh Grant in Two Weeks Notice. This should come as satisfying news to moviegoers that helped Miss Congeniality earn over $105 million at the box office.

But Two Weeks Notice has appeal beyond being a Sandra Bullock vehicle or a standard romantic comedy. Although Bullock does have her routine primped and polished, Two Weeks Notice benefits from more: a snappy, likable script by writer/director Marc Lawrence (writer of Forces of Nature and Miss Congeniality) and a witty, near-flawless performance by Hugh Grant.

Continue reading: Two Weeks Notice Review

The Owl and the Pussycat Review


OK
In the grand tradition of movies like The Odd Couple, Butterflies are Free, and Barefoot in the Park comes The Owl and the Pussycat, with a mixmatched pair of roommates trying to make a go of it in a tiny New York City apartment. Like virtually all of these 1970s comedies, after frustration comes understanding -- and George Segal's failed writer combined with Barbra Streisand's fetish hooker makes for a lot of frustration indeed. After an hour of solid comedy, though, Pussycat meanders into the melodrama of a less-than-believable romance. Alas, life in the Big Apple is always complicated.

Suits Review


Terrible
Phew, what's that smell? It's Suits, a lowly spoof on the advertising industry (have any of these kind of films ever been funny?) featuring a whole host of bad actors, and headlined by Robert Klein as the film's sole "star." I don't have much to say (the plot revolves around developing a maxi-pad campaign) except it's just plain bad -- better than watching commercials, maybe -- but not quite as good as leaving the TV off.

Next Stop Wonderland Review


Grim
Huh? Hope Davis and Alan Gelfant play two Boston mopers (one a nurse, one an aquarium worker) who just can't find their soulmates. Mom puts a personal ad in the paper for Davis, even(!). The ensuing comedy of errors ends up being a limp melodrama of cliches. The plot is straight out of Sliding Doors and 'Til There Was You, but Wonderland adds nothing to the will-they-meet? genre of romance filmmaking, and Davis wears way too much lipstick. Best reserved for late night insomnia attacks. This one will knock you right out.

How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days Review


Terrible
Here's a little something to think about, should you find your unfortunate, misguided, sorry ass dragged to see this utter waste of a movie. Who's more masculine-looking: Matthew McConaughey, with his Goldilocks looks and enormous pecs, or Kate Hudson, with her creepy, angular features and ironed-straight Guns N' Roses hairdo?

This spurious conjecture is sadly far more interesting than How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, a film which effectively loses its audience inside of 10 minutes.

Continue reading: How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days Review

The Safety of Objects Review


Weak
For all of Robert Altman's greatness, his lasting legacy to future filmmakers may be the wrongheaded assumption that anyone can successfully weave together sprawling, multi-character stories into a coherent thematic experience. With the exception of a scant few disciples (headed by the visionary Paul Thomas Anderson), these spiritual and technical descendents of Altman's films, too often hampered by schematic plotting and clumsy melodrama, routinely turn out to be wobbly facsimiles of Altman's operatic, multi-layered storytelling. The latest release that falls into said category is Rose Troche's The Safety of Objects, an uneven tale (based on the short stories of A.M. Homes) of intertwined suburban families dealing with grief and loss, and its failed bid for originality takes the form of an unreasonably high quirkiness quotient.

Despite an awful title that's perfectly suited for a hospital or construction site safety guide, the objects in question are not dirty syringes or rusty nails; rather, The Safety of Objects is brimming with narrative strands about people coping with life's most difficult and daunting elements (the loss of a loved one, sexual frustration, professional ennui) by focusing their quests for happiness on either their unsatisfying careers or mundane possessions such as dishwashers, guitars, and treadmills. Esther Gold (Glenn Close) fanatically dotes on her comatose songwriter son Paul (Joshua Jackson) in lieu of caring for her husband Howard (Robert Klein) and rebellious daughter Julie (Jessica Campbell). Neighbor Annette Jennings (Patricia Clarkson) is a single mother trying to take care of her two kids while waging a financial and personal battle with her ex-husband. Lawyer Jim Train (Dermot Mulroney) can't see the forest from the trees because of his fixation with work, and his constant absence from his wife and kids has made him unaware of son Jake's (Alex House) creepy relationship with a Barbie-esque doll that speaks to him. And in a prime example of dysfunctional overload, we even get sexually frustrated, fanatically health conscious housewife Helen Christiansen (Mary Kay Place), as well as neighborhood gardener Randy (Timothy Olyphant), who's dealing with the death of his adolescent brother.

Continue reading: The Safety of Objects Review

Goosed Review


Grim
Goosed invites you to imagine Jennifer Tilly as the Jewish daughter of Joan Rivers and Roger Klein, walking you through her childhood, adolescence, college years, and adult life as a slut in search of a doctor named Steven, whom her psychic told her she'd marry. The sheer volume of B- and C-grade stars on parade is astonishing. (Director Aleta Chappelle was a casting director before this, which explains far too much to write about.) Despite a couple of mildly humorous gags, this movie is nothing short of a throwaway.

Two Weeks Notice Review


Grim

The very fact that the trailers and commercials for "Two Weeks Notice" feature Sandra Bullock blushing with allegedly comedic embarrassment as she answers her cell phone during a wedding should serve as a mammoth red flag for the shallowness and unoriginality of this cookie-cutter romantic comedy.

That hackneyed and humdrum joke feels 20 years older than the technology it depends on -- and it's still the freshest gag in the superficial, hand-me-down script of writer-director Marc Lawrence.

Bullock plays a community activist lawyer -- a frumpy but desirable granola babe with a one-dimensional passion for preserving historical buildings in her native Brooklyn. Hugh Grant plays the oil to her water -- a charming, bumbling billionaire in charge of a development conglomerate that knocks down historical landmarks to build skyscrapers.

Continue reading: Two Weeks Notice Review

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