Rob Zombie

Rob Zombie

Rob Zombie Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Music Press Festival Quotes RSS

Rob Zombie And His Wife Sheri Moon Zombie Arrive At Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)

Rob Zombie , Sheri Moon Zombie - Rob Zombie and his wife Sheri Moon Zombie arrive at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 22nd January 2016

Rob Zombie and Sheri Moon Zombie
Rob Zombie and Sheri Moon Zombie
Rob Zombie and Sheri Moon Zombie
Rob Zombie and Sheri Moon Zombie
Rob Zombie and Sheri Moon Zombie
Rob Zombie and Sheri Moon Zombie

PETA's 35th Anniversary Party

Rob Zombie - PETA's 35th Anniversary Party at Hollywood Palladium - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 30th September 2015

Rob Zombie

PETA's 35th Anniversary Party

Rob Zombie - PETA's 35th Anniversary Party at Hollywood Palladium - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 1st October 2015

Rob Zombie

PETA's 35th Anniversary Bash

Rob Zombie - PETA's 35th Anniversary Bash held at the Hollywood Palladium - Arrivals at Hollywood Palladium - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 30th September 2015

Rob Zombie
Rob Zombie and Sheri Moon Zombie
Rob Zombie and Sheri Moon Zombie
Rob Zombie and Sheri Moon Zombie
Rob Zombie
Rob Zombie

Download Festival 2014 Review


Download Festival 2014 was a tamer affair than in previous years, largely owing to the event's tightened alcohol and drugs searches, bands being instructed not to encourage the crowds to mosh, more mainstream main stage headliners, fewer boobs being shown on the live camera feed, and the sombre tone of the renamed 'Stephen Sutton Stage'. Instead of holding a silence for the cancer-struck teen, festival attendees took part in a minute of respectful applause, which was paralleled by comedy pop punk band Bowling For Soup's tribute to the late comic, Rik Mayall.

Download Festival 2014 Review

In memoriam sections aside, the festival managed to transform what could be perceived as a weaker line-up compared to its preceding year into a three-day celebration of a broad range of the rock spectrum, filled with bespoke performance gems and quality heavy metal memories. First night closers Avenged Sevenfold brought a larger stage to Donington than they'd ever taken out of the US and combined imposing crypt-inspired adornments with an explosive set that proved on a world stage that they are worthy successors to titans Metallica and Iron Maiden.

The beady-eyed punter will have had a ball spotting the odd and hilarious happenings across the weekend, including a "face-melting" washboard solo from Berlin faux cowboys The BossHoss, punk's immature popsters Bowling For Soup asking a knight to decapitate a giant inflatable sheep, full contact medieval fighting from Battle Heritage, and Killswitch Engage's Jesse Leach inviting the crowd to "dance responsibly" to a particularly heavy breakdown. Ribs were probably broken in the latter instance.

Continue reading: Download Festival 2014 Review

Our 10 Favourite Download Festival 2014 Moments


Linkin Park Aerosmith Black Stone Cherry Skindred Avenged Sevenfold Rob Zombie Steven Tyler

Download Festival 2014 has come and gone in a dizzying blast of metal riffage, moshpits frenzies and surprisingly kind weather. The weekend was packed with memorable moments and stand-out performances but we decided to pick our ten favourite moments that truly epitomised the spirit of rock 'n' roll and getting dirty in that legendary Donington field.

Download 2014 Atmosphere Crowd CR: Gobinder Jhitta
Download Festival 2014: Awash With Rock, Not Mud.

1) Black Stone Cherry's Secret Set

Continue reading: Our 10 Favourite Download Festival 2014 Moments

Pinkpop 2014 Announce Headliners The Rolling Stones, Arctic Monkeys, Metallica Plus Many More

Posted on 12 March 2014

Pinkpop 2014 Announce Headliners The Rolling Stones,  Arctic Monkeys, Metallica Plus Many More

Rob Zombie Performs At Mayhem Festival 2013

John 5 - Rob Zombie performs during the Mayhem Festival 2013 at the Florida State Fairgrounds - Tampa, FL, United States - Thursday 1st August 2013

Rob Zombie, John 5 and Mayhem
Rob Zombie
Rob Zombie, Piggy D. and Mayhem
Rob Zombie
Rob Zombie, Piggy D. and Mayhem
Rob Zombie

The Lords Of Salem Review


Very Good

Rob Zombie has matured as a filmmaker, as witnessed by this well-structured horror shocker, which plays with both historical events and familiar movie imagery to keep us unnerved even if it's ultimately rather silly. Best of all is the way he remembers the value of schlock both to entertain and to gross us out. And it's his old-style touches that make the film much scarier than the usual shock-and-go horror movies.

The story draws on the 17th century Salem Witch Trials, at which women were brutally executed for suspicion of witchcraft. In present day Salem, free-spirited DJ Heidi (Moon Zombie) receives a mysterious record from an unknown band called The Lords, and when she plays it people start behaving strangely. Historical expert Francis (Davison) takes an interest in the record due to its odd tones, but he begins to worry that something nasty might be afoot. Indeed, Heidi starts having freaky dreams and visions. And it becomes apparent that she's the fulfilment of a dark prophesy involving the spawn of Satan himself.

Moon Zombie is terrific as the confused heroine who thinks what's happening is related to her recent decision to give up hard drugs. But of course, we know better. And we also know that she certainly should not trust the three cackling sisters (Geeson, Quinn and Wallace) who live downstairs. In addition, we see flashback scenes from 1696 in which a preacher takes on a coven of naked witches who dance around a bonfire led by their witchy leader (Foster). Yes, Zombie packs the movie with nutty ceremonies, grisly apparitions and naked, blood-soaked women.

Continue reading: The Lords Of Salem Review

Halloween (2007) Review


Good
Halloween's Michael Myers has seen many incarnations during his 29-year reign of terror. While he hasn't yet seen the vastness of space (boldly not going where most horror franchises eventually go), he has met a similar fate -- the remake. Although the majority of horror moviegoers are just looking for the next gore-fest, true horror fans are as rabid as Christians looking to crucify the latest blasphemously-filmed story of Christ. Luckily, director Rob Zombie is a member of the horror genre cult and treats his Halloween remake with the utmost respect, while amping up the intensity for a post-Saw audience.

From the 90-minute Abercrombie and Fitch ad that was 2003's Texas Chainsaw Massacre to the abysmal The Hills Have Eyes in 2006, classic horror films have been turned into exploitive, empty filler for the benefit of the box office. Zombie, on the other hand, explores the mythology of the original Halloween by psychologically deconstructing Michael Myers, instead of exploiting the original idea of "The Shape" -- the personified evil of the original. Zombie's film opens with the Myers family; of course, this is a Zombie film, so they are a white trash, long haired clan whose cursing would put sailors to shame. In this Halloween outing, we see Myers' transformation into the infamous serial killer.

Continue reading: Halloween (2007) Review

Metal: A Headbanger's Journey Review


Very Good
Everything else gets the documentary treatment. Why not heavy metal, too? Academic Sam Dunn puts metal under the microscope, tracing its origins back to bands like Cream and all the way through and beyond glam metal like Poison and Norwegian Death Metal like Ragnarok. Surprisingly, while Dunn is a devout metalhead, his movie is amazingly coherent and insightful, and he eventually tracks down just about every metal icon -- from Bruce Dickenson to Dee Snider to Rob Zombie to Alice Cooper -- all of whom are engaging on screen. The film is at its best with Snider, who discusses testifying before Congress in the days when metal was under fire for causing, among other things, teen suicides. At its worst is Ronnie James Dio, promoting himself when he's not bloviating about how Gene Simmons owns "the patent to the phrase 'OJ'" -- an absurd conjecture that Dunn should have cut from the movie. The film also takes a bizarre turn near the end, when Dunn basically throws a big "screw you" at everyone who's invested the time in watching his film. But hey, that's metal for ya.

Continue reading: Metal: A Headbanger's Journey Review

Going To Pieces: The Rise And Fall Of The Slasher Film Review


Good
All good things deserve a documentary about them, so why not the slasher film?

This Starz-produced documentary (which oddly has no director credited) gives a dutiful breakdown of the slasher flick's birth, death, rebirth, redeath, and so on until we reach the present day. As you might expect, progenitors Halloween and Friday the 13th get the bulk of screen time, with a goodly amount of footage devoted to interviews with the cast and crew (no Jamie Lee, alas). Every angle is covered, from special effects to script, but the film mostly focuses on the cultural impact of the slasher movie: Kids loved 'em, critics vilified them, and parents weren't happy at all when Santa Claus started killing people.

Continue reading: Going To Pieces: The Rise And Fall Of The Slasher Film Review

The Devil's Rejects Review


Excellent
House of 1000 Corpses, the last song on Rob Zombie's 2001 album The Sinister Urge, also served as the title track to the metal frontman-turned-filmmaker's 2003 directorial debut, but the cut's country twang-inflected ghoulishness would have made a more apt musical accompaniment for Zombie's The Devil's Rejects. Less a sequel than a spiritual follow-up, the director's latest revisits House's serial-killing Firefly clan as they're cast into the backwater dustbowls of rural America by a sheriff (William Forsythe) intent on exacting vigilante revenge for the murder of his brother. A gritty Western-via-grindhouse modern exploitation flick imbued with the ferocity of independent '70s horror, Zombie's splatterfest wisely alters virtually everything (narratively, stylistically, thematically) that characterized his campy, cartoonish and awkward first film. And from its coarse, graphic visual aesthetic, profusion of classic Southern rock tunes, and portrait of unrepentant mayhem, his film reverentially exults in the deranged spirit and impulsive, unpredictable energy of seminal genre masterpieces The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and The Hills Have Eyes.

The Devil's Rejects diverges from its predecessor beginning with its opening frames, in which the depiction of the Firefly residence - no longer a remote, forest-shrouded funhouse of horrors but, rather, a dilapidated structure situated in a stretch of open land - speaks to the film's rejection of atmospheric claustrophobia in favor of wide-open anarchy. A fascination with rampant disorder certainly fuels the tour de force intro sequence, a bullet-strewn siege on the Firefly home by Sheriff Wydell (Forsythe) and an army of police officers heightened by Zombie's sly use of freeze frames, Sergio Leone-esque close-ups, and The Allman Brothers' "Midnight Rider." Exhibiting a directorial maturity devoid of his former MTV-ish gimmickry (no hyper-edited montages with varying film stocks or bludgeoning industrial heavy metal here), the director orchestrates the chaotic events with feverish abandon, his shaky handheld camera set-ups and scraggly, sun-bleached cinematography (courtesy of Phil Parmet) placing us directly inside the carnage. By the time murderous siblings Otis (Bill Moseley) and Baby (Sheri Moon) escape their now overrun home to seek shelter in the rotting, blindingly white desert, Zombie has demonstrated a newfound adeptness at lacing nasty action with a breakneck thrust and vicious wit.

Continue reading: The Devil's Rejects Review

House Of 1000 Corpses Review


Bad
Maybe I'm just a little wimp who can't stand bad movies... but shouldn't I get hazard pay for seeing a movie this bad? [No. -Ed.] I'm symptomatic. This movie should come with a warning - this movie will cause nausea, boredom, the general feeling of constipation and a headache by banging your head against the seat in front of you about 1000 times.

The auteur debut of gothic icon Rob Zombie (think Puff Daddy in metal and with talent), I wasn't really hoping for much with House of 1000 Corpses -- schlock horror was anticipated and would have even been enjoyed -- but this is just ridiculous. House of 1000 Corpses is perhaps the most un-scary "scary movie" I've ever seen. It's not funny. It's not even really that interesting to look at.

Continue reading: House Of 1000 Corpses Review

Rob Zombie

Rob Zombie Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Music Press Festival Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Rob Zombie

Date of birth

12th January, 1965

Occupation

Musician

Sex

Male

Height

1.78






Rob Zombie Movies

The Lords of Salem Movie Review

The Lords of Salem Movie Review

Rob Zombie has matured as a filmmaker, as witnessed by this well-structured horror shocker, which...

Halloween (2007) Movie Review

Halloween (2007) Movie Review

Halloween's Michael Myers has seen many incarnations during his 29-year reign of terror. While he...

House of 1000 Corpses Movie Review

House of 1000 Corpses Movie Review

Maybe I'm just a little wimp who can't stand bad movies... but shouldn't I get...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.