Ritchie Coster

Ritchie Coster

Ritchie Coster Quick Links

Pictures Video Film RSS

Blackhat Review


OK

Michael Mann doesn't make standard frantic-pace thrillers (see Heat and Public Enemies); he prefers to work at a more controlled stride, so while this hacking adventure-mystery is intriguing it also feels a bit plodding. Yes, the film erupts now and then into a viscerally exhilarating action sequence, including a couple of astonishing shootouts, but over the course of two and a quarter hours it barely builds up a head of steam. And it's further frustrating that the intriguing characters never quite emerge as real people.

It opens with a cyberattack on a Chinese nuclear power plant, after which Captain Chen (Wang Leehom) heads to America to consult with FBI Agent Barrett (Viola Davis), urging her to get the one man who can solve this case: Chen's former MIT roommate Nick (Chris Hemsworth), now serving 13 years in prison for hacking. On supervised release, Nick heads to Hong Kong with Chen and Barrett, plus a minder (Holt McCallany) and Chen's computer-whiz sister Lien (Tang Wei), who immediately catches Nick's eye. As they secretly begin falling for each other, Nick indulges in a lot of illicit computer work to trace the attack to ruthless thug Kassar (Ritchie Coster) and his shadowy boss Sadak (Yorick van Wageningen). But they're based in Jakarta, and the FBI has no jurisdiction there.

Aside from some cheesy inside-the-computer animation, Mann makes the film look sleek and stylish, dropping clues into each scene to fill in the bigger picture about what is happening. And when an action set-piece breaks out, the film becomes urgent and gritty, with handheld camerawork and a breathless sense of peril that suggests that no one is safe. On the other hand, the script asks us to believe that Hemsworth's imprisoned computer geek can suddenly become a full-on action man, with astonishing gun-handling skills, the muscly precision of a Hollywood stunt man and the ability to out-strategise both spies and super-villains in a massive climactic showdown in a crowded city square.

Continue reading: Blackhat Review

Picture - Ritchie Coster , Sunday 9th September 2012

Ritchie Coster Sunday 9th September 2012 attending the premiere after party for 'The Train Driver' at the Signature Theatre

Ritchie Coster
Ritchie Coster

Picture - Leon Addison Brown and Ritchie... , Sunday 9th September 2012

Ritchie Coster - Leon Addison Brown and Ritchie Coster Sunday 9th September 2012 attending the premiere after party for 'The Train Driver' at the Signature Theatre

Picture - Ritchie Coster, James Houghton and... , Sunday 9th September 2012

Ritchie Coster - Ritchie Coster, James Houghton and Leon Addison Brown Sunday 9th September 2012 attending the premiere after party for 'The Train Driver' at the Signature Theatre

Picture - Ritchie Coster , Wednesday 25th January 2012

Ritchie Coster Wednesday 25th January 2012 HBO's 'Luck' Los Angeles premiere held at Graumans Chinese Theatre

The Sentinel (2006) Review


Grim
The Sentinel is one of those movies made for commercials and trailers full of shots of well-dressed Secret Service agents running and impassioned scenes where actors bark out lines like, "He's looking for an ally and the First Lady is a fine one to have." Rarely do these movies translate well into a longer format, and The Sentinel is far from the exception.

Directed by Clark Johnson (he of the awful S.W.A.T.), The Sentinel stars Michael Douglas and Kiefer Sutherland as former friends forced to become allies after a plot reveals an unknown mole inside the Secret Service. Pete Garrison (Douglas) is a veteran agent drawn deeper into the plot after his affair with the President's wife (Kim Basinger, playing the curviest First Lady ever) is revealed, leading investigator David Breckinridge (Sutherland) to turn his attentions to Garrison. Meanwhile, TV's babe of the moment Eva Longoria co-stars as Breckinridge's sexy new partner and Garrison's protégé.

Continue reading: The Sentinel (2006) Review

The Sentinel Review


Grim

The Sentinel is one of those movies made for commercials and trailers full of shots of well-dressed Secret Service agents running and impassioned scenes where actors bark out lines like, "He's looking for an ally and the First Lady is a fine one to have." Rarely do these movies translate well into a longer format, and The Sentinel is far from the exception.

Directed by Clark Johnson (he of the awful S.W.A.T.), The Sentinel stars Michael Douglas and Kiefer Sutherland as former friends forced to become allies after a plot reveals an unknown mole inside the Secret Service. Pete Garrison (Douglas) is a veteran agent drawn deeper into the plot after his affair with the President's wife (Kim Basinger, playing the curviest First Lady ever) is revealed, leading investigator David Breckinridge (Sutherland) to turn his attentions to Garrison. Meanwhile, TV's babe of the moment Eva Longoria co-stars as Breckinridge's sexy new partner and Garrison's protégé.

Continue reading: The Sentinel Review

The Tuxedo Review


OK
As a youngster, I never missed an episode of Inspector Gadget. The loveable, wannabe crime-fighting buffoon always had the necessary tools inside his trench coat to get out of a jam. Like Inspector Gadget, Jackie Chan's character in The Tuxedo has the essential secret weapons inside his formal wear. He has the one thing Gadget could never get however: a sexy super agent partner.

Chan is Jimmy Tong, an unlucky-in-love cabbie who drives his car like a madman through the streets of New York City. His wild driving skills pique the interest of a CSA (think CIA) agent named Steena (Debi Mazar) looking for a new driver for the millionaire secret agent Clark Devlin (Jason Issacs). Tong is hired, and after just a few days on the job, Devlin is maimed in a car bombing. Intrigued by Devlin's debonair lifestyle, Tong begins wearing Devlin's tuxedo and posing as the well-dressed playboy.

Continue reading: The Tuxedo Review

The Tuxedo Review


Grim

As Jackie Chan gets older, he's had to start toning down his stock in trade -- the amazing stunts and killer kung fu sequences that have made his movies such a joy to watch in spite of their often paltry plots.

Reduced to relying on a few low-risk fight sequences and his physical, Buster Keaton-style sense of humor, the seams are showing -- and they're ready to burst -- in "The Tuxedo," Chan's first Hollywood picture in which he's not sharing the marquee with Owen Wilson ("Shanghai Noon") or Chris Tucker (the "Rush Hour" flicks).

The movie's gimmick is paper-thin: Chan is a New York cabbie recently hired as chauffeur to a rich, suave secret agent (Jason Isaacs). When his boss is badly injured on a mission, Chan has to take his place, aided by the man's super-high-tech go-go-gadget evening wear -- a tux that can make him dance like James Brown, run like Steve Austin and fight like, well, Jackie Chan.

Continue reading: The Tuxedo Review

Ritchie Coster

Ritchie Coster Quick Links

Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Suggested

The 33 - Trailer

The 33 - Trailer

When a 100+ year-old copper & gold mine in Chile suffers considerable damage to the shaft due to a cave-in, the world's news is quick to report the...

'New Dr. Dre Album' Set To Drop This Weekend, According To Ice Cube

'New Dr. Dre Album' Set To Drop This Weekend, According To Ice Cube

Surprise albums are becoming increasingly common in 2015, to the point where they’re failing...

Ben Affleck Denies Reports That He's Dating His Children's Ex-Nanny

Ben Affleck Denies Reports That He's Dating His Children's Ex-Nanny

Ben Affleck has denied the sensational report that he is a new relationship with his children’s ex-nanny...