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Men In Black 3 Trailer


Agents K and J work for the Men In Black, an organisation specialising in hunting down aliens. Agent J used to be known as James Darrell Edwards III and was recruited by Agent K, after the latter observed the former hunting down an alien in disguise while working for the NYPD.

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Men In Black III Trailer


Agents K and J work for the Men In Black, an organisation specialising in hunting down aliens. Agent J used to be known as James Darrell Edwards III and was recruited by Agent K, after the latter observed the former hunting down an alien in disguise while working for the NYPD.

Continue: Men In Black III Trailer

The Golden Boys Review


Terrible
Daniel Adams' The Golden Boys has nothing to do with the Emmy-winning sitcom The Golden Girls (sorry, mom). In no way is it a masculine spin-off that replaces sassy-talking Bea Arthur, Betty White, and Rue McClanahan with Rip Torn, David Carradine, and Bruce Dern.

Yet there are similarities worth mentioning. Both rest on characters tolerating their "golden" years. And both offer television-sized entertainment.

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August Review


Grim
In Austin Chick's August, Josh Harnett is having a bad day. As pre-9/11 dot-com hotshot Tom Sterling, he's seen his parents and tech wonk brother treating him with contempt, the girl he's pining for giving him the brush-off, and his startup Internet company blowing up in his face. Drinking morosely at a bar (or as morosely as Hartnett can get) he lashes out at a fellow techie bandit who has just returned to the bar with a condemnatory, "Guys like you ain't got no vision, ain't got no passion, ain't got no soul." True enough. Tom is of course talking about himself but also, by extension, Hartnett's performance and Chick's film.

Chick's morality tale (a sort of insipid remake of Force of Evil except with techno sharks instead of gangsters) is all gloss and pizzazz but mostly pizz and no azz. August deals with two brothers, Tom and Josh (Adam Scott), who live large during the dot-com boom of '01, creating an in-the-moment start up called Landshark that is riding the top of the bubble with Joshua as the creative designer of the site and Tom as the obnoxious highfalutin promoter and resident SOB. Much like the World Wide Widget company in the satirical musical How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, there is no explanation given for what Landshark actually does; the company just is. But then it isn't. Soon after the opening credits and five months after its inception, the company is in the toilet and Tom is struggling to keep up the appearance of success for both the company and himself. But as in the Talking Heads song, they are both on the Road to Nowhere and somehow Tom has to come to grips with failure and regain his humanity, while looking out for his brother and his new family.

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Turn the River Review


Excellent
A jumpy forger asks an attractive pool hustler acquaintance, "What are you doing in town?" Without missing a beat, she replies, "Trying to get out." It's an apt summary of the entire plot of Turn the River, a stark, barebones genre piece redolent of rosin, racks, and eight balls, where the winning of a hustle bet of $50,000 doesn't signify triumph but escape.

Chris Eigeman makes an impressive debut as writer/director of Turn the River, ably abetted by an intense, edgy star turn from Famke Janssen as a pool hustler who wants to grab her abused son away from his weak, alcoholic father and get the hell out of town fast.

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Picture - Rip Torn New York City, USA, Sunday 9th September 2007

Rip Torn Sunday 9th September 2007 Opening Night of the off-Broadway play “Edge” held at The ArcLight Theatre - Arrivals New York City, USA

Picture - Angelica Torn, Rip Torn and... New York City, USA, Sunday 9th September 2007

Angelica Torn, Rip Torn and Celeste Holm - Angelica Torn, Rip Torn and Celeste Holm New York City, USA - Opening Night of the off-Broadway play "Edge" held at The ArcLight Theatre - After Party Sunday 9th September 2007

Picture - Rip Torn New York City, USA, Sunday 9th September 2007

Rip Torn Sunday 9th September 2007 Opening Night of the off-Broadway play "Edge" held at The ArcLight Theatre - After Party New York City, USA

Rip Torn

The Larry Sanders Show: Not Just the Best of... Review


Extraordinary
It's a cliche now to complain that HBO has the best original programming on television, but never has that been more true than in the case of The Larry Sanders Show, which ran for six seasons from 1992 to 1998 and was nominated for (and won) countless Emmys and every other award under the sun.

The show is pure genius and pure simplicity: Larry Sanders (Garry Shandling) is a late night talk show host on an unspecified network in the post-Carson era. Each week we were treated to the behind-the-scenes antics that go on before such a show can get on the air five nights a week: At its slapstick simplest we have Carol Burnett fleeing spiders by climbing on Larry's back. At its smarmy sickest, we have Larry's agent (Bob Odenkirk) selling him down the river so he can move on to greener pastures: Namely one Jon Stewart, a guest host for the show who became a running theme in later years as a cheap, network-approved replacement for the skewing-too-old Larry.

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Yours, Mine and Ours (2005) Review


Terrible
Three major studios (Sony, Paramount, and MGM) collaborated on one motion picture, and this is the result? A moronic mingling of massive families, Brady Bunch style, that isn't satisfied until father figure Dennis Quaid is coated in a sticky paste and pummeled into submission? That thinks it's amusing when one child pukes, but hilarious when another child slips in it? That somehow convinces Oscar winner Linda Hunt to attempt a demoralizing joke involving her pink thong? I've long since accepted that Hollywood requires its family comedies to be juvenile, but do they need to be so dumb?

Raja Gosnell's Yours, Mine and Ours is a remake of a mediocre Lucille Ball-Henry Fonda pairing that couldn't be further from the original. This version reunites former sweethearts Frank Beardsley (Quaid) and Helen North (Rene Russo), except now they're widows heading up huge families - he has eight children, she has 10. While attending their high school reunion, the two are pleasantly surprised to find that the feelings they once shared still exist. In the very next scene - which we have to assume occurs the day after the reunion - Frank and Helen are telling their respective broods that they tied the knot, forming one gigantic disaster of a family.

Continue reading: Yours, Mine and Ours (2005) Review

Beach Red Review


Excellent
If you've ever been curious where Terrence Malick stole his flashback-infused war film The Thin Red Line from, check out Beach Red, a clear influence for the picture in more ways than one. What starts off like any other war film (storming the beaches at Normandy, an examplary series of special effects for 1967) rapidly turns on its ear, as the various soldiers are developed via flashbacks to their lives at home: Families, girlfriends... director Cornel Wilde shows us that soldiers are people too, and that war is more than just a few bullets traded on the battlefield. Remarkably soulful for a war movie from 40 years ago, Beach Red is underseen but highly worth watching.

Marie Antoinette Review


Good
The word "soft" summarizes the world of Sofia Coppola, perfectly. Each film she has made has the tenderness, vagueness and, ultimately, the sensibility of a fluffy, white cloud in the middle of a blue sky. With two near-perfect films on her resume, 1999's The Virgin Suicides and 2003's majestic Lost in Translation, Sofia Coppola's third film should have been an easy play. Instead, we are given the beguiling Marie Antoinette.

There's the famous Marie-Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst): the one who so insipidly said "Let them eat cake" when learning of the famine and starvation of the French people and the one who had her head cut off and displayed, with ample delight, to the same people she told to eat said cake. Then there's the private Marie Antoinette: the one who was forced into a French marriage (she was Austrian originally) by her brutish mother and who would eventually lose a newborn baby right as her kingdom was crashing down. Coppola seems very confused as to whom she wants to show in Marie Antoinette.

Continue reading: Marie Antoinette Review

Zoom Review


Grim
Upon its release, Zoom was instantly reviled not only as one of the worst movies of 2006, but one of the worst movies ever made. As I write this it's hovering as the 15th worst film ever per the IMDB's (admittedly unscientific) "bottom 100," one run below Troll 2.

Is Zoom worse than #17 Phat Girlz? Worse than Glitter (#23)? Worse than Alone in the Dark (#38)? Zoom is hardly a masterpiece, but, really now, it isn't that bad.

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