Richard Masur

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Richard Masur - 'Fetch Clay, Make Man' cast and crew meet and greet at the New York Theatre Workshop - New York City, NY, United States - Friday 26th July 2013

Richard Masur
Des Mcanuff, Anthony Gaskins, K. Todd Freeman, Jeremy Tardy, Ray Fisher, Nikki M. James, Richard Masur, John Earl Jelks and Will Power
Richard Masur

Richard Masur - The premiere after party for 'Lucky Guy' held at Gotham Hall - New York City, NY, United States - Monday 1st April 2013

Richard Masur
Richard Masur

Richard Masur and Michael Gaston - Premiere of 'Lucky Guy' at the Broadhurst Theatre - Curtain Call - New York City, United States - Monday 1st April 2013

Richard Masur and Michael Gaston
Richard Masur, Joe Forbrich and Michael Gaston
Richard Masur and Michael Gaston
Richard Masur, Michael Gaston, Courtney B. Vance and George C. Wolfe

Richard Masur Wednesday 4th April 2012 The New York Premiere of HBO's new series, 'Girls', at the SVA Theater

Richard Masur Tuesday 16th August 2011 After party for Primary Stages World Premiere of 'Olive and the Bitter Herbs' by Charles Busch, held at 48 Lounge. New York City, USA

Richard Masur
Charles Busch, Dan Butler and Richard Masur
Dan Butler and Richard Masur
Dan Butler and Richard Masur
Dan Butler and Richard Masur
Dan Butler and Richard Masur

Lovely By Surprise Review


Very Good
One of those wilfully quirky movies that we're not quite sure what to do with, this film actually gets under our skin as it goes along, and as its seemingly random elements start to come together in an oddly moving way.

Marian (Preston) is struggling to write a novel, in which she pictures two brothers (Chernus and Roberts) living on a land-locked boat wearing just their underpants. Both of them have an awareness of their fate, and an ability to control it. So when Marian's mentor (Pendleton) tells her she needs to kill off her favourite character in order to find truth in the story, one of the brothers rebels and marches into the real world. He emerges in Marian's past, where as a little girl (Lamer) she's watching her widowed father (Rogers) wage war on his depression.

Continue reading: Lovely By Surprise Review

Heartburn Review


Weak
The backstory of Heartburn is infinitely more interesting than its reality: Jack Nicholson took the role after shooting had begun, after Mandy Patinkin was fired for not being funny enough.

Strange then: Nicholson isn't funny at all, and only the quirky charms of Meryl Streep make Heartburn remotely palatable. Heartburn is Nora Ephron's first comedy, based on her novel of the same name -- a thinly veiled expose about her life with journalist Carl Bernstein. The film casts Streep as a New York food writer and Nicholson as a Washington columnist. They meet, fall in love, decide to marry, have kids. Unfortunately, Nicholson can't keep it in his pants -- and all manner of trouble ensues.

Continue reading: Heartburn Review

Multiplicity Review


Good
I hate it when a film sounds like it's going to be great, has a hilarious teaser-trailer, stars some wonderful actors, features a small role played by the daughter of one of my film review subscribers, and ends up falling a bit flat on the screen.

Such is the case with Multiplicity, the new Harold Ramis-Michael Keaton comedy about a guy who clones himself in order to get a little free time.

Continue reading: Multiplicity Review

Palindromes Review


Terrible
For those coming back for more, Todd Solondz ladles on another hour and 40 minutes of hatred for the world and everyone in it. Devoid of compassion or mercy, Solondz presents the human race as a dead end of losers, cretins, hypocrites, blindly happy idiots, cynical brutes, pigs, liars, manipulators, and pedophiles. They all march to his drum, making their way through the manicured lawns and bland white houses of suburban New Jersey. Lest this be seen as an endorsement of his particular brand of "miserable-ism" cinema, Palindromes is a cinematic experience that makes one feel soul-sick and dead inside. It illuminates nothing about the world other than that it's a Bad Place, and the best thing we can do is sit back in our seats, watch images unfold on the screen, and collectively laugh mockingly at the dire situation these characters are in (and aren't we all).

Imagine hateful movies like Ladder 49, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle as being one kind of deceptive lie about the world. The kind that oversimplifies human beings, pretending we are more beautiful or powerful or good or wholesome than we actually are. Imagine sitcoms that paint a picture of us as having perfect jobs, clothes, houses, and bodies. Those are the kinds of films and media that independent film purportedly rebels against. And Todd Solondz takes it so far in the opposite direction that he paints pictures of the ugly and the lost, then asks us to mock them, and say that there's no hope. Palindromes is just as loathsome as the worst kind of lie Hollywood or television has duped us with, because it's duping us just as much in a different way. It smears us in cinematic dogshit, then says, "Isn't that horrible?"

Continue reading: Palindromes Review

Hanover Street Review


Very Good
An obscure Harrison Ford starrer, Hanover Street is a capable rendition of love and war a la The English Patient, but also recalling Catch-22 and the Indiana Jones films.

Directed by Peter Hyams, who hasn't done much of note in his whole career (including End of Days and a bunch of Jean-Claude Van Damme movies), Hanover Street is a pleasant meditation on finding solace in rough times. In London, during WWII, an American pilot (Ford) and a British nurse (Lesley-Anne Down) cross paths moments before an air raid and find each other's embrace not so intolerable. (Never mind that she's married.)

Continue reading: Hanover Street Review

The Thing Review


Very Good
John Carpenter made one of his better films back in 1982 but had the unfortunate bad luck to have to release it two weeks after E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial came out. Luckily, The Thing endures as a very good horror flick: genuinely scary and full of tension, and populated by one bad-ass monster. Russell does some good work as the star, but it's the supporting cast that set the pace for dozens of trapped-with-a-monster knockoffs to follow over the next 20 years.

Forget Paris Review


Very Good
It's a shame that so many romantic comedies are in current release, because inevitably, something good is going to be overlooked due to the cinematic glut of warm fuzzies. As the third of its type in about as many weeks, Forget Paris is one of the strongest entries of the genre.

Billy Crystal directs and stars in this Baby Boomer romantic fable about a pair of star-crossed lovers (Crystal, as Mickey, and Debra Winger, as Ellen) who can't seem to get their relationship right. Going through a dozen iterations of "boy meets girl, boy loses girl," the couple's story is told through a narrative from their friends over dinner.

Continue reading: Forget Paris Review

Risky Business Review


Extraordinary
I recently caught Risky Business on cable for the umpteenth time, and realized that the roots of American Beauty can all be found in this groundbreaking film. Think of Tom Cruises's Joel as a Lester Burnham before he lost his wide-eyed youth. You can see a glimmer of it in Joel's existential monologue ("It seems to me that if there were any logic to our language, trust would be a four letter word."), and he's certainly got the devil-may-care attitude locked up. Case in point is the plot itself -- when Joel wrecks his parents' Porsche, he turns their house into a one-night-only brothel to raise the money to pay for the damages. Even the soundtrack has the same feeling to it. Of course, Cruise owns this movie -- with some excellent one-liners and a certain renowned dance move through the living room -- but what of the rest of the cast? Joe Pantoliano and Rebecca De Mornay have struggled to find some measure of success, but writer/director Paul Brickman is the film's most curious alumnus. In nearly 20 years, he's written a smattering of scripts and has directed only one additional picture, 1990's Men Don't Leave. Paul, didn't you learn anything from your man Joel?
Richard Masur

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In a busy year that has seen John Krasinski star in movies and TV shows, he somehow managed to find the time to direct, produce and star in the new...

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Hanover Street Movie Review

Hanover Street Movie Review

An obscure Harrison Ford starrer, Hanover Street is a capable rendition of love and war...

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