Richard Gere Page 5

Richard Gere

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Richard Gere and David D'Arcy - Peter J. Owens Award: An Evening with Richard Gere: Time Out of Mind at Castro Theatre - San Francisco, California, United States - Sunday 26th April 2015

Richard Gere and David D'arcy
Oren Moverman and Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Richard Gere - 2015 Tribeca Film Festival - 'Franny' - Premiere at BMCC Tribeca PAC - Arrivals at Tribeca Film Festival - New York, New York, United States - Friday 17th April 2015

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Richard Gere - 2015 Tribeca Film Festival - 'Franny' screening at the BMCC - Arrivals at Tribeca Film Festival - New York City, New York, United States - Friday 17th April 2015

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Rome Film Festival - 'Time Out Of Mind' - Premiere

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Rome Film Festival - 'Time Out Of Mind' - Photocall

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Photographs of the stars of 'Time Out Of Mind' as they attended a photocall at the 9th Rome International Film Festival

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Richard Gere - The 2014 Hamptons International Film Festival - 'Time Out of Mind' - Premiere at Guild Hall - East Hampton, New York, United States - Friday 10th October 2014

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Director Oren Moverman and Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Ray Negron and Richard Gere - New York premiere of 'Henry & Me' at Ziegfeld Theatre - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 18th August 2014

Ray Negron and Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Serena Girardi, Richard Gere and Joe Girardi
Joe Girardi and Richard Gere
Richard Gere and James Fiorentino
Richard Gere

Richard Gere, Theo James and Andrew Renzi - Richard Gere and Theo James film scenes for their upcoming movie 'Franny' on JFK Boulevard - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States - Thursday 14th November 2013

Richard Gere, Theo James and Andrew Renzi
Richard Gere and Theo James
Richard Gere, Theo James and Andrew Renzi
Richard Gere and Theo James
Richard Gere and Theo James
Richard Gere, Theo James and Andrew Renzi

Richard Gere - Richard Gere on the film set of his new movie 'Franny' shooting on location outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art - Philadelphia, PA, United States - Tuesday 5th November 2013

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere and Franny

Richard Gere and Dakota Fanning - Richard Gere and Dakota Fanning on the film set of their new movie 'Franny' shooting on location on the Delaware River. The film is about a philanthropist that meddles in the lives of a newly-married couple in an attempt to relive his past. - Philadelphia, PA, United States - Tuesday 22nd October 2013

Richard Gere and Dakota Fanning
Richard Gere and Dakota Fanning
Richard Gere and Dakota Fanning
Richard Gere and Dakota Fanning
Richard Gere and Dakota Fanning
Richard Gere

Richard Gere - 'Arbitrage' UK film premiere held at the Odeon West End - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 20th February 2013

Richard Gere

Richard Gere and Carey Lowell - 2nd Annual Sean Penn and Friends Help Haiti Home Gala benefiting J/P HRO presented by Giorgio Armani - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 12th January 2013

Richard Gere and Carey Lowell
Richard Gere and Carey Lowell

Richard Gere - IFC Films and Downtown Calvin Klein with The Cinema Society present a special screening of 'Ain't Them Bodies Saints' at The MOMA - New York, United States - Tuesday 13th August 2013

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Christine Teigen, John Legend, Elizabeth Olsen and Richard Gere - The 19th Annual City Harvest An Evening Of Practical Magic at Cipriani 42nd Street - Arrivals - New York City, United States - Tuesday 16th April 2013

Christine Teigen, John Legend, Elizabeth Olsen and Richard Gere
Christine Teigen
Christine Teigen and John Legend
Christine Teigen
Christine Teigen and John Legend
Christine Teigen

Richard Gere and Elizabeth Banks - 2013 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Sunset Tower - Arrivals - West Hollywood, California, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

Richard Gere and Elizabeth Banks
Elizabeth Banks and Richard Gere
Elizabeth Banks and Richard Gere
Richard Gere and Elizabeth Banks
Richard Gere and Elizabeth Banks

Richard Gere - Oscars Red Carpet Arrivals at Oscars - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Paul Epworth, Adele Adkins and Richard Gere - 85th Annual Oscars at Oscars - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

Paul Epworth, Adele Adkins and Richard Gere
Adele and Paul Epworth
Adele and Paul Epworth
Adele and Paul Epworth
Adele and Paul Epworth
Paul Epworth and Adele Adkins

Richard Gere - Richard Gere seen arriving at LAX airport - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 22nd February 2013

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Richard Gere - UK Premiere of 'Arbitrage' at Odeon West End - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 20th February 2013

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Richard Gere - 'Arbitrage' UK film premiere at Odeon West End - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 20th February 2013

Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Nicholas Jarecki - Richard Gere attend the premiere of 'Arbitrage' - Amsterdam, Netherlands - Monday 18th February 2013

Richard Gere and Nicholas Jarecki
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere
Richard Gere

Richard Gere 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel - Red Carpet Featuring: Richard Gere Where: Los Angeles, CA, United States When: 13 Jan 2013

Richard Gere and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Richard Gere; Carey Lowell The Weinstein Company's 2013 Golden Globe Awards Party Featuring: Richard Gere, Carey Lowell Where: Beverly Hills, California, United States When: 13 Jan 2013

Richard Gere and Carey Lowell

Richard Gere; Carey Lowell 2nd Annual Sean Penn and Friends Help Haiti Home Gala benefiting J/P HRO presented by Giorgio Armani - Arrivals Featuring: Richard Gere, Carey Lowell Where: Los Angeles, California, United States When: 12 Jan 2013

Richard Gere and Carey Lowell
Richard Gere and Carey Lowell
Richard Gere and Carey Lowell
Richard Gere and Carey Lowell
Richard Gere and Carey Lowell
Richard Gere and Carey Lowell

Brooklyn's Finest Trailer


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Amelia Review


Weak
This terrific true story has been so overproduced that there's virtually no life left in it. Even though every frame looks exquisite, not one scene rings true because the filmmakers leave all humour and passion off the screen.

In 1928, Amelia Earhart (Swank) bursts onto the dawning aviation scene as a confident pilot giving men a run for their money. Quickly snapped up by promoter George Putman (Gere), her aerial achievements instantly grab media attention. Reluctantly agreeing to marry George if she can keep her independence, she works rather too closely with the government's first aviation chief Gene Vidal (McGregor). And then in 1937 she sets off to fly around the world with navigator Fred Noonan (Eccleston).

Continue reading: Amelia Review

Amelia Trailer


Watch the trailer for Amelia

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Nights In Rodanthe Review


Very Good
With the Gulf Coast narrowly dodging Gustav and the Houston area recuperating from Ike, now might not be the best time for a breathy romance that uses the violent lashing of a vicious hurricane to simulate foreplay between passionate lovers.

It's hard to fault director George C. Wolfe, however. His Nights in Rodanthe adaptation merely adheres to a blueprint provided by best-selling author Nicholas Sparks, who makes use of a tempest in his source novel but also provides earnest human connections and palpable heartache.

Continue reading: Nights In Rodanthe Review

The Hunting Party Review


OK
Despite the Western genre's resurgence -- and Hollywood's willingness to remake already acceptable examples of the classic format -- Richard Shepard's The Hunting Party has nothing to do with Don Medford's smoldering love-triangle-on-the-pioneer-trail from 1971 that carries the same name. Instead of a brilliant stand-off between Gene Hackman and Oliver Reed, we get the versatile Terrence Howard and a dependable (but unremarkable) Richard Gere sprinting through a ripped-from-the-headlines satire of our nation's ongoing military turmoil overseas.

Simon Hunt (Gere) has had enough. After years spent covering the atrocities of war with fearless cameraman Duck (Howard) in tow, Hunt lets his wearied emotions get the better of him during a live segment. His meltdown doesn't approach Howard Beale's "mad as hell" level, but it's enough to pull the plug on Hunt's career for the time being.

Continue reading: The Hunting Party Review

An Officer And A Gentleman Review


Extraordinary
Most articles about the state of American movies in the 1980s feature writers bitching and moaning about how the era was built on sequels and action-packed, plot-deprived blockbusters. They may have a point. Independent films really didn't become relevant (again) until sex, lies, and videotape, which was released in 1989. Miramax was still growing.

Something good did come out of the decade: a slew of great date movies. Not surprisingly, there was a formula to it. The typical woman would get a love story usually featuring a hunky, emotionally lost male lead. The typical man would get a macho storyline featuring slapstick, sports, violence, or male bonding. Sometimes he got to see bare breasts. It all led to movies that didn't require three days of negotiation: Hoosiers, Witness, Field of Dreams, Tootsie, Say Anything (for the music geek subset), and the John Hughes stuff for the teens.

Continue reading: An Officer And A Gentleman Review

Bee Season Review


Excellent
One of the rarest beasts in the celluloid kingdom is the two-director film. I don't mean films with co-directors; I'm talking about two names under that "directed by" credit. It happened earlier this year with Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller's relentless Sin City, which couldn't be farther from the style or subject matter than Scott McGehee and David Siegel's Bee Season.

We see a helicopter bring a large metal statue of the letter A over a west coast bridge. Watching intently, young Eliza Naumann (Flora Cross), her brother and her parents drive to colleges and jobs. They each have their own lives and secrets that we can't even fathom yet. Eliza's secret is that she's an expert speller, able to close her eyes and harness a power to see the letters come alive around her. After winning her school's spelling bee, she attempts to tell her father, Saul (Richard Gere), but he doesn't notice, not until she wins the next round and gets her name in the paper, which turns Saul's attention away from his son, Aaron (Max Minghella), and towards his daughter's strange talent.

Continue reading: Bee Season Review

Bee Season Review


Excellent
One of the rarest beasts in the celluloid kingdom is the two-director film. I don't mean films with co-directors; I'm talking about two names under that "directed by" credit. It happened earlier this year with Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller's relentless Sin City, which couldn't be farther from the style or subject matter than Scott McGehee and David Siegel's Bee Season.

We see a helicopter bring a large metal statue of the letter A over a west coast bridge. Watching intently, young Eliza Naumann (Flora Cross), her brother and her parents drive to colleges and jobs. They each have their own lives and secrets that we can't even fathom yet. Eliza's secret is that she's an expert speller, able to close her eyes and harness a power to see the letters come alive around her. After winning her school's spelling bee, she attempts to tell her father, Saul (Richard Gere), but he doesn't notice, not until she wins the next round and gets her name in the paper, which turns Saul's attention away from his son, Aaron (Max Minghella), and towards his daughter's strange talent.

Continue reading: Bee Season Review

Chicago Review


Excellent
The Broadway revival of Chicago managed to be cheeky and creaky, a throwback to pseudo-racy vaudeville that's "clean-sexy" in a non-threatening, Marilyn Monroe sort of way. Chicago the movie, from first-time feature director Rob Marshall, amplifies the passion and ratchets up the sass, all with a wink and a grin held over from the original tongue-in-cheek theatrical production.

From its first song-and-dance to its final curtain call, Marshall's Chicago packs its frames with all that jazz; translated, that means corruption, adultery, exploitation, and death. This ain't the 1990s, folks. It's the Roaring '20s, and murder - as seedy attorney Billy Flynn (Richard Gere) so aptly puts it - is "a form of entertainment."

Continue reading: Chicago Review

Runaway Bride Review


Very Good
Julia Roberts has made a career out of being one of Hollywood's most irresistible glamour dolls. Dress her up in any role and she'll flash that wide smile, deliver her awkward laugh, and expose a peculiar giddiness, which gives her a sense of vulnerability that fans have come to adore. Ever since the Cinderella story Pretty Woman ten years ago that catapulted her career to mega-stardom, her roles have all been typecast around her good looks and charismatic personality (Steel Magnolias and My Best Friend's Wedding). Runaway Bride is no exception to the rule. However, as the old saying goes; if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Runaway Bride brings writer Garry Marshall back together with Roberts, Richard Gere, and memorable Pretty Woman costar Hector Elizondo for another unlikely love story.

Continue reading: Runaway Bride Review

Autumn In New York Review


OK
No matter how shrewd, wealthy, or debonair a man can be, in a Hollywood drama, he is always humbled by love. Richard Gere is no exception to this rule, and for the second time in a year, he is typecast in yet another implausible romantic lead. Why even bother establishing his character? Like always, he's successful, powerful, and sexy, yet unable to curb his womanizing ways. Only this time it's not Julia Roberts as the flamboyant prostitute or eccentric altar ditcher, but a weepy Winona Ryder, who is half his age and happens to be dying of a rare heart disease. Sound like a winner? It isn't.

Autumn in New York, directed by Joan Chen (Xiu Xiu: The Sent Down Girl), is the recycled love story of a man who has it all but nobody to share it with. The tacky promo, "He taught her how to live, she taught him how to love," basically explains the plot in a nutshell. Flourishing Manhattan restaurant owner Will Keane (Gere) sees something in the beauty, wit, and innocence of young Charlotte (Winona Ryder), despite the fact that he dated her deceased mother in the past. On the flip side, Charlotte has merely a year to live and is not afraid to die because she has nothing truly worth living for. The two find sustenance in one another, but as all love stories go, they endure trying times. Winona is either too young or too sick, and he can't control his libido or escape his shady past. So they're meant for one another, but how long can it last?

Continue reading: Autumn In New York Review

Sommersby Review


Good
Relatively weak popcorn drama, about a man who comes back from the Civil War to reclaim his place at his plantation, only he's not the hero everyone thinks he is. Remake of a French film.

Pretty Woman Review


Excellent
Every cliché has at least one perfect example: An "Exhibit A" that makes the hidden good side of the cliché come to light and makes the jaded tired old story new again. For the tale of the hooker with the heart of gold, the perfect example is Petty Woman.

You have a dapper, somewhat older wealthy man (Richard Gere), a surprisingly attractive prostitute (Julia Roberts), a toadie type (Jason Alexander) bent on breaking up the high roller and the ho, and the kindly gent (Hector Elizondo) who teaches the trailer trash how to hang with the upper crust.

Continue reading: Pretty Woman Review

The Mothman Prophecies Review


Very Good
Although its title sounds new age goofy, The Mothman Prophecies most certainly is not. It's an intelligent, tense thriller of the unexplained, a film for anyone who thinks the X Files movie comes up short. In fact, most of the action plays out like an extended X Files episode, one that would leave fans of the genre a little spooked, slightly sad, and wanting more.

Based on real events, most of which occurred in 1966 and 1967 (the film is set in present day), The Mothman Prophecies is a complex meeting of unseen monsters, voices from beyond, and eerie coincidence (...or is it?) Richard Gere stars as John Klein, an established Washington Post reporter whose good fortune is shattered when his beautiful wife Mary (Debra Messing) sustains severe injuries in what appears to be a single car accident. As Mary slips in and out of consciousness, she asks if John has seen "it." "It," according to her wild sketches, appears to be some sort of beastly giant bat. Either Mary has suffered brain damage, or something wholly supernatural has entered John's life.

Continue reading: The Mothman Prophecies Review

Primal Fear Review


Bad
It's been a long time since a really bad movie has come down the pike, but it had to happen eventually. This time up, it's Primal Fear, yet another badly-titled Richard Gere-as-a-lawyer flick that will keep you groaning in your seat when you aren't busy laughing at the unintentional humor.

If you had the misfortune of seeing Gere in 1992's Final Analysis, you'll be familiar with the setup. Gere plays Martin Vail, a self-described bigshot defense attorney in Chicago. Laura Linney is Janet Venable, a crass and unlikable public prosecutor, who spends most of the film developing her primary character trait: being a bitch. Aaron Stampler (Edward Norton) is who the lawyers fighting over (when they aren't rehashing their 6 month-long affair), because it turns out that Aaron butchered the local Archbishop. Maybe.

Continue reading: Primal Fear Review

Dr. T And The Women Review


OK
What has Mr. T been doing for all these years since The A-Team? Well, he's been hard at work in medical school, obviously, and now he's Dallas's most sought-after OB/GYN!

We were admonished by a studio rep at the beginning of Dr. T and the Women not to spoil the plot twists in our review. Well, I'm going to spoil one right now by telling you this: Mr. T does not appear in this movie!

Continue reading: Dr. T And The Women Review

Looking For Mr. Goodbar Review


Excellent
It takes a strong stomach to see Annie Hall playing a wanton slut of a woman, left behind by the sexual revolution. Nonetheless, Diane Keaton pulled a 180 in this gritty drama, about a schoolteacher for the deaf who experiments with drugs and (more importantly) wild sex, during the era of free love. Overflowing with symbolism and hopelessly depressing, this one is a true eye-opener. If you think you know Ms. Keaton -- you don't, until you've seen this one.

The Jackal Review


OK
If you can get past Diane Venora's laughable turn as a Russian agent (isn't that why we have Lena Olin?), you might find enough guilty pleasure in the cacophonous remake The Jackal to have a good time. Bruce Willis chews even more scenery as the villain than Richard Gere does as his Irish nemesis. Together they end up with quite an impressive body count -- watch especially for an early performance from the always entertaining Jack Black.

Chicago Review


Excellent

Within the first five seconds of the musical number that opens the film adaptation of "Chicago," director Rob Marshall has established such a sublimely vivacious speakeasy atmosphere of hot jazz, cigarette smoke and showgirls that you'll feel as if you've been transported backstage at a posh 1920s cabaret.

The scene crackles with seductive energy as vaudeville siren Velma Kelly (Catherine Zeta-Jones) prowls across the footlights with a phalanx of sexy dancers, cooing "All That Jazz" in a voice that turns the men at the darkened tables around the stage into putty.

And just for a second, wannabe song-and-dance girl Roxie Hart (Renée Zellweger) imagines herself up there in Velma's place. As the beautiful flapper floozy stands in the shadows at the back of the theater, wide-eyed but reeking of wily ambition, Marshall (who directed the recent stage revival of "Cabaret") shows us a flash of Roxie's imagination in which she's the fabulous star of the fabulous show, wearing a fabulously silver sequined waterfall dress, strutting and singing to wild applause.

Continue reading: Chicago Review

Shall We Dance Review


Weak

A warmhearted semi-romance of self-discovery, "Shall We Dance" opens so promisingly that it's a big disappointment when the picture suffers crucial missteps that throw off its entire rhythm.

Richard Gere stars as a melancholy Chicago probate lawyer whose prosaic life (established in an uncommonly affecting voice-over and a perfectly pitched montage of daily routine) gets a secret, seductive pick-me-up when he discovers a passion for ballroom dancing. Riding home on the elevated train day after day, he becomes drawn to a possible kindred spirit, a beautiful stranger (Jennifer Lopez) who seems to be forever staring sadly out a dance-studio window. One day his intuition gets the better of him. He signs up for a dance class to be near her.

As Gere's ennui is only tenuously related to his marriage (to Susan Sarandon), the film does not go the obvious direction with this attraction. But director Peter Chelsom ("Serendipity") and screenwriter Audrey Wells ("Under the Tuscan Sun") find other ways to turn this remake of a mediocre 1997 Japanese film about cultural repression into a wholly Hollywood affair.

Continue reading: Shall We Dance Review

Autumn In New York Review


Weak

In "Autumn In New York," terminally tumor-bound Winona Ryder and her seriously senior lover Richard Gere have a whole conversation about what it means to be "unique" as opposed to "typical."

Oh, the irony.

An utterly typical movie lacking even a hint of uniqueness, "Autumn" is a Hallmark card redeaux of the "Love Story"-style tragic romance with a September-May twist.

Continue reading: Autumn In New York Review

The Mothman Prophecies Review


OK

By making a big deal out of the fact that his supernatural chiller "The Mothman Prophecies" is based -- however loosely -- on true events, director Mark Pellington seem to be hoping the picture's vagueness and creative liberties might come under less scrutiny.

Furnishing the story about an epidemic of haunting phenomena in a West Virginia hamlet with an acutely icy and unsettling atmosphere, Pellington certainly makes it easy to go along for the ride. But whenever there's a break in the action, the film's fictionalized elements can't help but come into focus, requiring the viewer to beat back the same sense of curiosity required to get sucked into this creepy legend in the first place.

The "true events" on which the movie is based took place in Point Pleasant, W.Va, in the mid 1960s, where dozens of residents reported eerie encounters with a giant, shadowy, winged humanoid with glowing red eyes. Many more said they began hearing unearthly voices that vaguely prophesized impending disasters and other phenomenon.

Continue reading: The Mothman Prophecies Review

Richard Gere

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Richard Gere

Date of birth

31st August, 1949

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.8


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Richard Gere Movies

Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer - Trailer and Clip Trailer

Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer - Trailer and Clip Trailer

Norman Oppenheimer is a New York based hustler determined to climb the social ladder and...

Time Out Of Mind Trailer

Time Out Of Mind Trailer

George is a man whose life has turned upside down. With no possessions and no...

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel Movie Review

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel Movie Review

A badly under-developed script leaves a fine cast without much to do in this sequel...

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel Trailer

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel Trailer

Set eight months after the 2012 original film, The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel sees...

Arbitrage Movie Review

Arbitrage Movie Review

Richard Gere delivers such a charming, layered performance that he overcomes a contrived plot that...

Movie 43 Movie Review

Movie 43 Movie Review

A collection of random shorts that focus mainly on idiotic male behaviour, this portmanteau comedy...

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Movie 43 Trailer

Movie 43 Trailer

If you were hoping for a romantic comedy with a harmless storyline, romance and inoffensive...

Arbitrage Trailer

Arbitrage Trailer

Robert Miller is billionaire hedge fund businessman who at first glance seems to have the...

Brooklyn's Finest Movie Review

Brooklyn's Finest Movie Review

This darkly shaded cop drama has an effectively moody tone, although it never feels any...

Brooklyn's Finest Trailer

Brooklyn's Finest Trailer

Watch the trailer for Brooklyn's FinestOver one week everything changes in the lives of three...

Amelia Trailer

Amelia Trailer

Watch the trailer for Amelia Amelia Earhart was a true hero to many men and...

Nights in Rodanthe Movie Review

Nights in Rodanthe Movie Review

With the Gulf Coast narrowly dodging Gustav and the Houston area recuperating from Ike, now...

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