Richard Chamberlain

Richard Chamberlain

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Sticks and Bones Opening Night Party - Arrivals

Richard Chamberlain - Opening night after party for The New Group production Sticks and Bones, held at the Out NYC hotel - Arrivals. at Out NYC hotel, - New York, New York, United States - Friday 7th November 2014

Richard Chamberlain
Richard Chamberlain
Bill Pullman, Scott Elliott, Holly Hunter, David Rabe, Morocco Omari, Raviv Ullman, Nadia Gan, Ben Schnetzer, Adam Bernstein and Richard Chamberlain
Bill Pullman, Scott Elliott, Holly Hunter, David Rabe, Morocco Omari, Raviv Ullman, Nadia Gan, Ben Schnetzer, Adam Bernstein and Richard Chamberlain

Sticks and Bones Meet and Greet

Richard Chamberlain - The New 42nd street studios was the location for a meet and greet for the Tony award winning play Sticks and Bones in New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 30th September 2014

Richard Chamberlain
Richard Chamberlain
Richard Chamberlain
Richard Chamberlain
Richard Chamberlain

AFI Fest 2011 premiere of 'Shame' held at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Richard Chamberlain and Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Richard Chamberlain, Joanna Chamberlain Hollywood, California - AFI Fest 2011 premiere of 'Shame' held at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Wednesday 9th November 2011

The Towering Inferno Review


Good
There is so much to love about The Towering Inferno it's hard to know where to begin. Steve McQueen and Paul Newman are together at last! Fred Astaire gets drenched! O.J. Simpson saves a cat! Faye Dunaway wears Dacron! As one of the first mid-'70s disaster epics (produced by the King of Disaster, Irwin Allen), this supersized burnfest inspired countless star-studded copycats and lives on today as a sort of camp classic of its kind. It doesn't have Red Buttons like The Poseidon Adventure does, and it doesn't have Victoria Principal's cleavage jiggling in the tremors of Earthquake, but it does have pretty much everything else.

On the occasion of the dedication of the world's tallest skyscraper (which I for one would never consider building in earthquake-prone San Francisco, by the way), an A-list party is planned for the top floor. This way to the glass-enclosed elevator, please. Architect Doug Roberts (Newman) and builder Jim Duncan (William Holden) are proud, but they don't know that Duncan's cost-cutting son-in-law (Richard Chamberlain) has compromised safety for profit. Sure enough, when a small fire breaks out, things go really bad really fast, and firemen Michael O'Halloran (McQueen) and Harry Jernigan (Simpson) arrive on the scene holding their hoses.

Continue reading: The Towering Inferno Review

The Music Lovers Review


OK
If you like Tchaikovsky, now's your chance to see him do just about everything except compose music. Through the twin filters of Ken Russell and the year 1970, The Music Lovers is a smashmouth look at Tchaikovsky's (Richard Chamberlain) life and loves and, in keeping with the filmed story of most composers, his descent into gibbering madness. Swan Lake it ain't, unless that lake was filled with blood and on fire.

The Last Wave Review


Weak
What you say? Aussie lawyer Richard Chamberlain takes a strange trip into his psyche (he constantly dreams of floods and tsunamis) and into Aboriginal mysticism when he defends a young native against a murder charge. The Aborigine takes him into the sewers, where he is pelted with questions like "Are you a fish!? Are you a snake!? Are you a man!?" We're going with fish, but that's just us.

I've never really understood the fascination with this film, widely heralded as a masterpiece from Peter Weir (more widely known now for The Truman Show). It's creepy to watch Chamberlain's David Burton get sucked deeper and deeper into a freaky end-of-the-world prophecy and a secret society living underground (half of which is revealed through dreams, with David bolting awake screaming, every 10 minutes), but drawing any kind of useful conclusion from the film is difficult. (And the nonstop didgeridoo music is enough to drive you crazy.) I've seen the movie a few times and continue to wonder what the point was supposed to be.

Continue reading: The Last Wave Review

The Three Musketeers (1973) Review


Good
I saw the word "whimsical" used in one product description of this installment of The Three Musketeers, a faithful adaptation of the classic novel, and no word could better describe the film. It's a combination of belly laughs via non-stop sight gags, endless swashbuckling, and only a dab of plot, all of which serve to make this an engaging event movie that takes place in France instead of in space. Packed with classic actors (including Charlton Heston, Christopher Lee, and Raquel Welch), this is a fun, nearly farcical adventure that's definitely worth a look.

The Four Musketeers Review


Good
More of the same from Richard Lester, who made The Three Musketeers a slapstick classic. Extremely cute and nearly as much fun as the original (D'Artagnan, now a musketeer, has to save his girlfriend from the clutches of the evil Rochefort), but this isn't a story that's exactly begging for a sequel.
Richard Chamberlain

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