Rhona Mitra

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'The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water' world premiere - Arrivals

Rhona Mitra - 'The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water' world premiere at AMC Lincoln Square Theater - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Saturday 31st January 2015

Rhona Mitra

2015 Weinstein Company and Netflix Golden Globes After Party

Rhona Mitra - 2015 Weinstein Company and Netflix Golden Globes After Party at The Beverly Hilton Hotel at Robinsons May Lot at The Beverly Hilton Hotel, Golden Globes, Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 11th January 2015

Rhona Mitra
Rhona Mitra
Rhona Mitra
Rhona Mitra
Rhona Mitra

The Art Of Elysium And Samsung Galaxy Present Marina Abramovic's HEAVEN - Red Carpet

Rhona Mitra - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived for the Art of Elysium's 8th Annual Heaven Gala held which was held at Hangar 8 in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 11th January 2015

The Art of Elysium's 8th Annual Heaven Gala

Rhona Mitra - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived for the Art of Elysium's 8th Annual Heaven Gala held which was held at Hangar 8 in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 10th January 2015

Rhona Mitra
Rhona Mitra
Rhona Mitra
Rhona Mitra
Rhona Mitra

The Loft Trailer


Five married friends decide to buy a loft together, and each owned a key, but no one else did. The men use the loft as a place to have affairs with their various mistresses. But one day, one of the men goes to the loft, only to discover an unknown woman dead in the master bed. When all the members are assembles, they realise that they have to call the police - thus exposing their secret of their loft to their wives. But with their other halves now knowing about their dirty little secrets, the men are forced to look into their past to find out just who killed the mysterious woman.

Continue: The Loft Trailer

2014 LACMA Art+Film Gala honoring Barbara Kruger and Quentin Tarantino

Rhona Mitra - A variety of celebrities were photographed as they arrived at the 2014 LACMA Art+Film Gala which honored conceptual artist Barbara Kruger and film director Quentin Tarantino, the event was presented by Gucci in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 1st November 2014

Rhona Mitra
Rhona Mitra

Reuniting the Rubins Review


Terrible
A contrived script and clunky direction undermine this British film, which veers from silly comedy to harsh drama to dark tragedy. And this family is far too harshly dysfunctional for us to accept the filmmakers' attempts at sentimentality.

When his mother (Blackman) purchases the old family home, Lenny (Spall) must cancel his retirement cruise and reunite his four estranged children for a Jewish holiday celebration. But gathering the ruthless capitalist (Callis), eco-warrior (Mitra), ultra-orthodox rabbi (O'Connor) and Buddhist monk (Newman) in the same place will require a miracle. Sure enough, it's a disaster, and Lenny's only hope is that he can stop the war long enough to have dinner together.

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Underworld: Rise of the Lycans Review


Good
Upon first description, Underworld: Rise of the Lycans appears completely unnecessary, even for one of the Underworld movies, which, like the Resident Evil pictures, are well-practiced in the art of spinning inessential straw into inessential off-season box-office gold. Rise of the Lycans is a prequel, seeking to explain in greater detail the mythology-heavy plot turns discussed so endlessly in the very first Underworld movie: How and why vampires and werewolves came to so loathe each other.

The reasons, it turns out, are not dissimilar to what I faintly recall as the central conflict from the first film: a vampire named Sonja (Rhona Mitra) is in love with a lycan called Lucian (Michael Sheen). The backdrop for their affair is an unnamed and presumably European medieval land rather than an unnamed and presumably European city, though the color scheme remains the same, with everything seemingly lit by a grayish-blue moon.

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Doomsday Review


Terrible
Step aside, zombie films -- there's a new derivative genre in town. The post-apocalyptic thriller is out to trump your ongoing redundancy. Instead of bringing something new to the dystopian brave new world, writer/director Neil Marshall's Doomsday has simply decided to reference each and every offering in the oeuvre. A substantial slip from his championed efforts (Dog Soldiers and The Descent), this Escape from Newcastle calamity is like watching George Miller channel John Carpenter. Toss in a little Aliens, a few medieval riffs, and enough Mad Max references to choke Mel Gibson's ego and you've got a disaster pretending to be profound.

When the Reaper virus devastates Glasgow, the British government quarantines all of Scotland. A few survivors make it out. The rest are locked behind heavy steel walls and guarded gates. Nearly three decades later, the plague reappears, this time in downtown London. Desperate to find a cure, Cabinet Minister Caranis (David O'Hara) gets Police Chief Nelson (Bob Hoskins) to send his top officer back into the hot zone. He chooses lady loose cannon Eden Sinclair (Rhona Mitra). Her goal? Lead a group of soldiers to Kane (Malcolm McDowell), a doctor who was once in charge of Reaper research. Seems the satellites have been picking up images of humans in the supposedly uninhabitable realm, and if Kane has found a cure, they may be able to stop the insidious disease.

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Skinwalkers Review


Terrible
Apparently, it's pretty hard to update the classic movie monsters. When filmmakers aren't turning every well known cinematic creep into a fey Eurotrash version of their former scary selves, they're reinventing the mythology into a mindless "gee whiz" joke. So it only seems fair that after zombies got hyper-activated and vampires gained the glum Goth seal of approval, werewolves would be next on the pointless reinvention list. And thanks to the New Age Native American tweak entitled Skinwalkers, these formerly ferocious beasts got the incredibly short end of the post-modern scream stick.

There's an ongoing war between two lupine factions. On the one side are those who feel that the ancient ability to shapeshift is a curse, and want desperately for an ambiguous prophecy to be fulfilled. Then there are the blood-addicted, supernatural junkies who love killing so much that they want to keep the foretold omen from occurring. And what is this fabled forecast? Seems a young boy, born of human mother and wolfman seed, will turn 13 and... well, that part's not all that clear. Apparently, once the kid hits puberty, he will put the depressed beasts out of their misery while buzz killing the other lycanthropes happy hunting. So naturally, one side protects the brat (named Timmy), while the other is looking to carve up his adolescent guts.

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The Number 23 Review


Unbearable
There are at least 23 ways in which The Number 23 sucks. The most important revolves around its inability to distinguish creepiness from cliché. It fails to realize that there's not nearly enough weed on this planet for its supposedly deep observations to blow your mind. As a result, moments meant to instill fear either evoke boredom or, more often, the giggles.

The movie begins with what has to be the 23rd re-enactment of the Seven credits that were groundbreaking 12 years ago. They do, however, feature a treasure trove of fun facts about the number 23 such as the Mayans predicting that the world would end in 2012. 20 + 12 = 32, which is 23 backwards; get it? Like I said, not nearly enough weed.

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The Life of David Gale Review


Grim
Let's start by clearing up a common misconception: Despite an uninspired and pretentious title that indicates to the contrary, The Life of David Gale is not a true story. Laughably, even the Austin Visitors Bureau posted on its web site that it's based on fact! (The film was shot at and around The University of Texas at Austin (my alma mater), dubbed The University of Austin in the film for soon-to-be-apparent reasons.) Now one would think that a story about an anti-death penalty activist who ends up on death row himself would jog some memories at the Bureau, but oh well. Maybe it's just wishful thinking. Not much of historical note has happened in Austin since Charles Whitman's shooting spree killed 16 people in 1966.

This is a movie meant to be a sophisticated take on criminal punishment, but unfortunately it's actually the kind of garden variety thriller that Hollywood pumps out with one thought: to keep you guessing what surprise The Big Twist will bring. Unconvinced? Recent garbage like High Crimes and Reindeer Games leap to mind. Same formula, same disastrous results.

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The Life Of David Gale Review


Grim

Practically trumpeting its utter dependence on Hollywood convention, the death row drama-with-a-twist entitled "The Life of David Gale" acts as its own executioner, injecting the very first scene with a lethal cliché from which the film never recovers.

In the opening moments, a rental car driven by a big-city journalist (Kate Winslet) breaks down on a lonely Texas highway as she's desperately rushing to an execution with evidence that could exonerate the man scheduled to die.

So trite and inane is this plot device that 11 years ago it was a major punchline in Robert Altman's cynical, Hollywood-skewering farce "The Player." But to director Alan Parker ("Angela's Ashes") and writer Charles Randolph this is a very serious moment in what they erroneously hope will be a very important film about the capital punishment debate.

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Get Carter Review


Weak

If the rain-slicked new Sylvester Stallone revenge fantasy flick "Get Carter" seems a little familiar, it's with good reason.

It could be that the picture is a remake of a gnarly 1971 film of the same name (starring Michael Caine, who appears in this one too).

It could be that the bad-guy-going-after-worse-guys plot -- about a Las Vegas mob enforcer determined to find and snuff the people who whacked his estranged brother -- isn't all that different from the story of a hard-as-nails parolee avenging his daughter in last year's "The Limey."

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