Rene Auberjonois

Rene Auberjonois

Rene Auberjonois Quick Links

Pictures Video Film RSS

Rene Auberjonois - Les Poissons (From "The Little Mermaid")


In a scene from Disney's Oscar winning 1989 movie 'The Little Mermaid', Rene Auberjonois performs 'Les Poissons'. 

Celebrities pose for photographers, without British actor Patrick Stewart after he refused to take part in a photocall for 'Destination Star Trek London' at the ExCel Centre

Rene Auberjonois Friday 19th October 2012 Celebrities pose for photographers, without British actor Patrick Stewart after he refused to take part in a photocall for 'Destination Star Trek London' at the ExCel Centre

Rene Auberjonois

Walker Review


Excellent
Following his one-two punch of cultic cinema, Repo Man and Sid & Nancy, director Alex Cox went on to make two more films that consecrated his reputation as, well, a malcontent. It was 1987 and Cox's latest film, Straight to Hell, was universally panned, not completely unfairly. But just five months later, Cox returned with Walker, an equally-batty spectacle built on the last years of the late-19th-century soldier-of-fortune William Walker and his conquest of Nicaragua. Given only a paltry release in December '87, Cox's film maudit was banished to the realm of VHS for two decades before Criterion took an interest and decked it out with all the trimmings.

Far too crazy to be fatalist, Walker strangely begins on a moment of near-defeat for the titular batshit commando (the phenomenal Ed Harris) and his madcap battalion. Saved by a sandstorm and his lawyer, Walker finds himself back in the arms of his love Ellen Martin (Marlee Matlin). The fact that Ephraim Squier (Richard Masur) holds the keys to Walker's future in politics doesn't stop Ellen from asking Squier to fornicate with swine. Soon enough, Walker is trading away his future with Ellen for a mission to Nicaragua at the behest of Squier and Cornelius Vanderbilt (Peter Boyle).

Continue reading: Walker Review

The Little Mermaid Review


Good
DIsney's animation team looked just about washed up (no pun intended) before The Little Mermaid hit theaters in 1989. Before The Little Mermaid, we had "classics" like The Great Mouse Detective and Oliver & Company. Afterwards, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King. The Little Mermaid was a turning point, reviving Disney's animation studio by grossing almost $110 million at the box office. It was also the last hand-painted Disney film, and the first to use computer animation.

That said, The Little Mermaid is not that great of a movie. The story is simplistic to an extreme, and the animation is extremely crude, a rush job that looks better if you aren't wearing your glasses. But thanks to a spunky heroine with a clamshell brassiere, a menacing villain, singing animals, and some calypso-inspired tunes, The Little Mermaid was a hit with kids and adults. It's certainly not brain food, but give this fish the credit its due: Turning around Disney.

Continue reading: The Little Mermaid Review

M*A*S*H Review


Extraordinary
As its opening song tells us, suicide may be painless, but war doesn't look all that bad, either, not the way the storied M*A*S*H tells it.

M*A*S*H isn't just the most successful translation from film to TV show of all time, it's also a masterful movie in its own rite. Maybe Robert Altman's best work (and his first movie of any serious note), though he's barely associated with the film in the popular consciousness now.

Continue reading: M*A*S*H Review

The Cat Returns Review


OK
This rather simplistic entry into the feel-good anime genre comes from Kiroyuki Morita (last seen animating the raunchy Perfect Blue but also responsible for working on the kind-hearted Kiki's Delivery Service). The Cat Returns is Morita's first outing as director, and it's a fair, if ultimately unrealized experience.

The story involves young Haru (voiced for the States by Anne Hathaway), who rescues a helpless cat from an oncoming truck, only to find herself in the debt of a feline kingdom she formerly didn't know existed. Haru is awakened one night by a bizarre procession on her street: It's the king of the cats (Tim Curry), bearing gifts. Before she knows it, she's whisked into the world of the cats, where she is transformed into a half-cat/half-person, and is told she will be marrying the cat she saved, who turns out to be the cat prince.

Continue reading: The Cat Returns Review

Burning Down The House Review


Grim
Most curious: Joanne Baron produces and stars Burning Down the House (not to be confused with Bringing Down the House).

Trashy and foul-mouthed (and playing with her boobs throughout the film), I wracked my brain to figure out where I'd seen her before. Turns out Baron was Mitch Taylor's mother in the cult classic Real Genius. Here she's reunited with Dr. Hathaway himself, William Atherton.

Continue reading: Burning Down The House Review

McCabe & Mrs. Miller Review


Good
Robert Altman's only Western takes a long time to get heated up, but in its final hour it truly burns. As John McCabe, Warren Beatty is terrific as a hustler who's built a reputation for himself as a gunslinging tough guy, though secretly he's really a coward who's never killed anyone. After opening a smash-hit brothel in a wintry village, a big cartel swoops in to buy him out. He refuses, and a price is quickly put upon his head.

Continue reading: McCabe & Mrs. Miller Review

Eyes Of Laura Mars Review


OK
Vaguely supernatural thrillers were a dime a dozen in the 1970s -- this one's about a controversial photographer (Faye Dunaway) who inexplicably begins having visions where she sees through the eyes of the local serial killer. Naturally she witnesses a bunch of murders, no one believes her, and soon he starts stalking her directly. While all eyes are on the creepy driver (Brad Dourif), any one of a half-dozen supporting actors could be The One. Absurd, yes, but it's got a certain '70s vibe that you usually only get from Gene Hackman and/or Clint Eastwood vehicles.

The Patriot Review


Excellent
A note to filmmakers who want to make a movie about a war: Please understand that your film does not need to be as long as the actual war itself. We will not hold it against you if it's shorter. As such, I will try to keep this review to a length where you can read it in a few minutes.

The Patriot gives Mel Gibson the opportunity to do something he's never done before: To orate at length about the evils of taxation without representation... oh, okay... and to kill a bunch of damn redcoats!!!

Continue reading: The Patriot Review

The Hindenburg Review


Weak
Before there was Titanic (the movie, not the ship), there was The Hindenburg, an equally epic look at one of mankind's most notorious disasters -- this one, of course, caught on film, unlike that famed sunken ship. Robert Wise (Star Trek: The Motion Picture) tried to turn the disaster into part love story, part spy tale, part thriller, and part musical (really: there's a ditty about Hitler), with George C. Scott as a sympathetic Nazi trying to foil a bombing plot on the zeppelin (the disaster has since been pegged on static electricity). Incredibly long and awfully bad in its plotting and pacing, the film succeeds only as a curiosity: It shows us the guts of the ship as they really appeared. Who knew it was so fancy?

Snide and Prejudice Review


Grim
Quite an assembly of talent is ultimately wasted in this near-pointless look at a mental patient (that guy from the TV remake of Jason and the Argonauts) who thinks he's Hitler. A bunch of his fellow patients seem to think they're members of his staff, too. Essentially this is a re-imagining of Marat/Sade, adding in a head shrink (that guy from one of the Star Trek shows) who may be crazy too. Hitler's psychosis (the real Hitler, I mean) has been examined with substantially more depth and to a more powerful effect numerous times before.

The Little Mermaid Review


Good
DIsney's animation team looked just about washed up (no pun intended) before The Little Mermaid hit theaters in 1989. Before The Little Mermaid, we had "classics" like The Great Mouse Detective and Oliver & Company. Afterwards, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King. The Little Mermaid was a turning point, reviving Disney's animation studio by grossing almost $110 million at the box office. It was also the last hand-painted Disney film, and the first to use computer animation.

That said, The Little Mermaid is not that great of a movie. The story is simplistic to an extreme, and the animation is extremely crude, a rush job that looks better if you aren't wearing your glasses. But thanks to a spunky heroine with a clamshell brassiere, a menacing villain, singing animals, and some calypso-inspired tunes, The Little Mermaid was a hit with kids and adults. It's certainly not brain food, but give this fish the credit its due: Turning around Disney.

Continue reading: The Little Mermaid Review

Batman Forever Review


Grim
Batman's reins have been turned over from director Tim Burton (now producing) to Joel Schumacher, from lead Michael Keaton to Val Kilmer, and from an old, baroque Gotham to a heavily stylized, kiddie-pop city.

A lot can be said for the idea that the setting of a picture thoroughly controls its tone. What we Batman Forever is an attempt to make Gotham more like Los Angeles, full of neon, black lights, and people sporting primary-color wigs. Unfortunately, something has been lost in translation.

Continue reading: Batman Forever Review

King Kong (1976) Review


Unbearable
Not even Charles Grodin, in his campiest, hammiest role of all time -- if not the campiest, hammiest role of all time -- can salvage this remake of the 1933 classic beyond one-starsville. This is frankly one of the worst films ever made, a useless and unwanted recreation of the past. Kong is actually a man in a monkey suit, smashing up miniature sets. Jeff Bridges' beard reminds you of a Brillo pad. Jessica Lange's outfits remind you of a hooker's (and of course, she falls in love with the magilla). It's over two hours long and when it isn't wholly laughable, it's utterly boring. And who, when on the run from a giant ape marauding New York City, drops into a bar for a drink?
Rene Auberjonois

Rene Auberjonois Quick Links

Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Suggested

Eric Clapton: Live At The Royal Albert Hall - Trailer

Eric Clapton: Live At The Royal Albert Hall - Trailer

The full recording of 'Eric Clapton: Live At The Royal Albert Hall', is set to reach cinemas very soon

Idris Elba Posts Great Response To Anthony Horowitz's Apology After

Idris Elba Posts Great Response To Anthony Horowitz's Apology After "Street" Remark

Horowitz was originally asked whether he thought Idris Elba would be suitable for the role of the next 007.

No Escape - Movie Review

No Escape - Movie Review

One of the strongest action thrillers in recent years, this gripping movie cleverly casts actors known for comedy in the central roles.

Ricki and the Flash - Movie Review

Ricki and the Flash - Movie Review

Meryl Streep is having so much fun playing an ageing rocker that the audience only barely registers that this film isn't nearly as deep as it's...

Advertisement
Creamfields Festival 2015 Live Review

Creamfields Festival 2015 Live Review

Creamfields was back again, with a plethora of headline disc jockeys, showcasing Creamfields as the powerhouse of UK-electronic festivals.

Donald Trump Can't Wait To Run Against Kanye In 2020

Donald Trump Can't Wait To Run Against Kanye In 2020

The 2016 Republican candidate is already thinking ahead

Keith Richards Hoping To Start On A New Rolling Stones Album

Keith Richards Hoping To Start On A New Rolling Stones Album "Next Year"

Richards is eager to begin work on follow-up to 2005's 'A Bigger Bang', but doesn't reckon that will happen until April 2016 at the earliest.

Cate Blanchett Cast As Lucille Ball In New Biopic

Cate Blanchett Cast As Lucille Ball In New Biopic

The two-time Oscar winner has been cast as '50s TV sweetheart Lucille Ball, according to new reports.

Advertisement