Rebecca Miller

Rebecca Miller

Rebecca Miller Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

Maggie's Plan Review

Good

A New York comedy with vivid characters and a contrived plot, this feels rather a lot like a Woody Allen movie. Although writer-director Rebecca Miller keeps it rather cute and silly, avoiding the more pointed issues raised in her script. Still, the snaky, farcical story is very entertaining, and the witty performances from the terrific cast make it well worth a look.

Greta Gerwig plays Maggie, a woman who has given up on finding the perfect man, so she sets out to have a child using a donation from a pickle entrepreneur (Travis Fimmel). Then just after she has the fertilisation procedure, she falls for her fellow professor John (Ethan Hawke), who's looking for a reason to leave his haughty Danish wife Georgette (Julianne Moore). Three years later, Maggie and John are settled down with their toddler daughter. But Maggie is frustrated that John has become aimless, unable to finish his long-in-the-works novel. She's also somehow ended up raising his and Georgette's kids (Mina Sundwall and Jackson Frazer). So she hatches a plan to get Georgette to take him back.

The premise is ingenious, and Miller fills it in with colourful characters and lots of detail, plus several convenient twists and implausible turns of the plot. This keeps the film from ever becoming more than a bit of nutty fluff, but at least it's entertaining fluff. Gerwig and Hawke are superb as self-involved people whose relationship develops in surprisingly resonant ways. Both are sympathetic but not hugely likeable in the way they remain oblivious to everyone around them, and watching them interact is a lot of fun. But the entire film is stolen by Moore in a hilariously spiky turn as the high-maintenance Georgette, who peers imperiously through her riotous array of furs and scarves but can only barely hide the fragile person inside.

Continue reading: Maggie's Plan Review

Greta Gerwig , Rebecca Miller - Sony Pictures Classics' 'Maggie's Plan' LA Special Presentation at ArcLight Hollywood - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 26th April 2016

Greta Gerwig and Rebecca Miller
Greta Gerwig
Rebecca Miller, Greta Gerwig, Damon Cardasis, Rachel Horovitz and Lucy Barzun Donnelly
Rebecca Miller, Greta Gerwig, Damon Cardasis, Rachel Horovitz and Lucy Barzun Donnelly
Rebecca Miller, Greta Gerwig, Damon Cardasis, Rachel Horovitz and Lucy Barzun Donnelly
Rebecca Miller, Greta Gerwig, Damon Cardasis, Rachel Horovitz and Lucy Barzun Donnelly

Maggie's Plan Trailer


Maggie's has always been practically minded and now that she's in her thirties and has decided that it's time to have a child, the small issue of not having a partner isn't going to stand in her way. She's never really experienced being head over heels in love so when she meets John Harding (an aspiring novelist) their instant connection comes as a shock to the sometimes bookish Maggie. 

As Maggie and John's relationship becomes more and more serious, Maggie seeks advice from her best friends. Falling for John isn't just a usual case of starting a relationship, John has many other people to consider - namely his wife and kids. John has been married to a Danish academic for years but over recent times, the couple have become more and more distant. 

Soon John realises that Maggie is a source of inspiration for him and he's ready to move on from his prior life. We fast-forward 2 years down the line and the couple have a child but Maggie isn't quite as head over heels in love with the man she thought John was. Maggie cannot bring herself to leave John and decides to come up a highly unconventional way to try and find a solution to her current predicament. 

Rebecca Miller - The 66th annual International Berlin Film Festival (Berlinale) - Maggie's Plan - Photo Call at Grand Hyatt hotel at The Grand Hyatt Hotel - Berlin, Germany - Monday 15th February 2016

Rebecca Miller
Greta Gerwig, Julianne Moore and Rebecca Miller
Greta Gerwig, Julianne Moore and Rebecca Miller
Greta Gerwig, Julianne Moore, Rebecca Miller and Damon Cardasis
Greta Gerwig, Julianne Moore, Rebecca Miller and Damon Cardasis
Greta Gerwig, Julianne Moore, Rebecca Miller and Damon Cardasis

Rebecca Miller - The 66th annual International Berlin Film Festival (Berlinale) - Maggie's Plan - Press Conference at Grand Hyatt hotel at The Grand Hyatt Hotel - Berlin, Germany - Monday 15th February 2016

Rebecca Miller
Rebecca Miller
Rebecca Miller

Rebecca Miller - Museum of Moving Image Salutes Julianne Moore at 583 Park Avenue - Arrivals at 583 Park Avenue, - New York, United States - Wednesday 21st January 2015

Rebecca Miller

Rebecca Miller - Shots of a variety of stars as they took to the red carpet for the Museum Of The Moving Image as they honored Julianne Moore at 583 Park Avenue in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 20th January 2015

The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Review


Excellent
As a more emotional take on the themes examined in American Beauty, this internalised drama is subtle and unpredictable. It also features terrific performances from an eclectic cast.

Pippa (Wright) is married to the much-older Herb (Arkin), a publisher who hates that he's now retired. But it's Pippa whose world is starting to unravel, as she reaches the point where she needs more than being a trophy wife and mother to two now-grown kids (Kazan and McDonald). Her sleepwalking antics indicate that her subconscious has already figured this out, but it'll take a look at her childhood (played by Lively and youngster Madeline McNulty) to help her see what she needs to do next.

Continue reading: The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Review

Angela Review


Bad
A 10-year-old Christian Scientist girl tries to convince her 6-year-old sister that Satan is watching them all the time. As hopelessly artsy as it sounds, this is just plain morose, self-indulgent, and pointless filmmaking.

Reissued on DVD to take advantage of writer/director Rebecca Miller's new cachet courtesy of Personal Velocity, this inauspicious debt longs to be Heavenly Creatures -- or less explicably, Like Water for Chocolate, is the DVD case heralds. Too bad it's a third-rate indie, well photographed but ultimately not worth watching for either its precocious stars or its ham-fisted stars.

Continue reading: Angela Review

Angela Review


Bad
A 10-year-old Christian Scientist girl tries to convince her 6-year-old sister that Satan is watching them all the time. As hopelessly artsy as it sounds, this is just plain morose, self-indulgent, and pointless filmmaking.

Reissued on DVD to take advantage of writer/director Rebecca Miller's new cachet courtesy of Personal Velocity, this inauspicious debt longs to be Heavenly Creatures -- or less explicably, Like Water for Chocolate, is the DVD case heralds. Too bad it's a third-rate indie, well photographed but ultimately not worth watching for its precocious stars or its ham-fisted stars.

Continue reading: Angela Review

Personal Velocity Review


Excellent
Combining an excellent literary accent with eclectic reflection on life's perpetual habit of transitioning, Rebecca Miller's highly touted Personal Velocity comprises engaging three-dimensional Everywomen in compelling stories that end up surprisingly cinematic. Split into three portraits, each detailed enough to fill out characters that shy away from easy categorization, the 85 minutes of emotional endeavors may be painful but never bore.

First there's Delia (Kyra Sedgwick, consistently underrated for far too long), a tough cookie from hard knocks who must manage to break the cycle of family abuse without losing control in front of kids that have already seen Mommy cut down to size. Next is Greta (Parker Posey, fantastic in her most human role to date) who accidentally works her way up the corporate ladder, but also possibly out of a marriage that has lost all spark. Finally, Paula (Fairuza Balk, always interesting to watch) is living from one sign-from-above to the next after realizing she's pregnant.

Continue reading: Personal Velocity Review

Proof (2005) Review


Bad
The Broadway hit Proof put playwright David Auburn's name on the map, earned him a shelf full of prizes (from Tony to Pulitzer), and reminded those of us who stopped paying attention that Mary-Louise Parker was a star. A movie adaptation was inevitable, though a drastic mishandling of the material was not.

Familiarity with Auburn's stage presentation may breed contempt for this version, which feels distinctly off-kilter from its first frames. Mysteries that held water longer in the theater instead land like Doc Marten's on a flimsy piece of plywood here. Director John Madden samples a chatty, analytical approach to his literal translation but gets swept up in stagy, awkward, and all-too-deliberate line readings. Much like last year's ill-conceived Phantom of the Opera, this movie has few cinematic qualities that elevate it above a tedious and emotionless play rehearsal shot on location.

Continue reading: Proof (2005) Review

The Ballad Of Jack And Rose Review


Very Good
For some people isolation means happiness. Such is the case of Jack and Rose, father and daughter (Daniel Day-Lewis and Camilla Belle), living sparingly and deeply enjoying it on an island off the Pacific Northwest. In earlier days, it was the setting for a commune -- one that Jack built, led, and closed down as times and manias changed. Now, with the funds from a buyout in his bank account, his comforts are secure, and that's a bit of heaven for Rose who not only adores her father and cherishes her life, but will protect both with all her energy and life force.

A couple of problems threaten to spoil the remote idyll. Jack has a terminal heart condition and they both know his days are numbered. What each wants to do about it differs monumentally. For her part, Rose is devoted to the idea of committing suicide as soon as dad leaves his mortal coil, feeling she couldn't face life without him. In the wisdom of maturity and a wider scope of options, Jack would like to live out the remainder of his life with a companion who, at the same time, would become a replacement adult supervisor for teenager Rose when he's gone. Nice plan -- one that even a normal father might well dream up. And, since he's been dating Kathleen (Catherine Keener) during his rare visits to the mainland, and likes her, he asks her to come live with him and Rose.

Continue reading: The Ballad Of Jack And Rose Review

Rebecca Miller

Rebecca Miller Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Suggested

'Lost' BBC Session By Led Zeppelin Recovered And Restored

'Lost' BBC Session By Led Zeppelin Recovered And Restored

The 1969 session, including the only known recording of 'Sunshine Woman' by the band, will be included on a re-issue of 'The Complete BBC Sessions'...

Michael J. Fox Joins Coldplay On Stage To Perform 'Back To The Future' Songs

Michael J. Fox Joins Coldplay On Stage To Perform 'Back To The Future' Songs

The 55 year old actor joined Chris Martin and co. on stage in New Jersey to perform 'Earth Angel' and 'Johnny B. Goode'.

Bjork Announces Virtual Reality Exhibition In London, Plus Single Live Show

Bjork Announces Virtual Reality Exhibition In London, Plus Single Live Show

Bjork Digital comes to London's Somerset House in September, along with a single live show at the Royal Albert Hall.

Advertisement
Has Kanye West Broken The Law Over Taylor Swift Phone Call?

Has Kanye West Broken The Law Over Taylor Swift Phone Call?

Kim Kardashian released an audio excerpt from a phone call between Kanye and Taylor Swift over the lyrics of 'Famous' - but if it was recorded...

DJ Shadow - The Mountain Will Fall Album Review

DJ Shadow - The Mountain Will Fall Album Review

There's very much a strength of conviction in remaining what you were, but arguably more so in becoming what you want to be.

'Poldark' And 'X Factor' Set For TV Clash In September

'Poldark' And 'X Factor' Set For TV Clash In September

The BBC drama starring Aidan Turner returns to BBC One on September 4th.

Guns N' Roses detained for gun possession

Guns N' Roses detained for gun possession

Guns N' Roses were detained at the Canadian border last week for gun possession but they're adamant the weapon didn't belong to them.

Advertisement

Rebecca Miller Movies

Maggie's Plan Movie Review

Maggie's Plan Movie Review

A New York comedy with vivid characters and a contrived plot, this feels rather a...

Maggie's Plan Trailer

Maggie's Plan Trailer

Maggie's has always been practically minded and now that she's in her thirties and has...

The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Movie Review

The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Movie Review

As a more emotional take on the themes examined in American Beauty, this internalised drama...

Advertisement
Personal Velocity Movie Review

Personal Velocity Movie Review

Combining an excellent literary accent with eclectic reflection on life's perpetual habit of transitioning, Rebecca...

Proof (2005) Movie Review

Proof (2005) Movie Review

The Broadway hit Proof put playwright David Auburn's name on the map, earned him a...

The Ballad of Jack and Rose Movie Review

The Ballad of Jack and Rose Movie Review

For some people isolation means happiness. Such is the case of Jack and Rose, father...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.