Rebecca Miller

Rebecca Miller

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Museum of Moving Image Salutes Julianne Moore

Rebecca Miller - Museum of Moving Image Salutes Julianne Moore at 583 Park Avenue - Arrivals at 583 Park Avenue, - New York, United States - Wednesday 21st January 2015

Museum Of The Moving Image Honors Julianne Moore

Rebecca Miller - Shots of a variety of stars as they took to the red carpet for the Museum Of The Moving Image as they honored Julianne Moore at 583 Park Avenue in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 20th January 2015

Vanity Fair Oscar Party

Doris Kearns Goodwin, actor Daniel Day-Lewis and Rebecca Miller - 2013 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Sunset Tower - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 25th February 2013

Daniel Day-Lewis, Rebecca Miller and Doris Kearns Goodwin
Doris Kearns Goodwin, actor Daniel Day-Lewis and Rebecca Miller
Doris Kearns Goodwin, actor Daniel Day-Lewis and Rebecca Miller
Daniel Day-Lewis, Doris Kearns Goodwin and Rebecca Miller
Doris Kearns Goodwin, actor Daniel Day-Lewis and Rebecca Miller

The 85th Annual Oscars at Hollywood & Highland Center

Rebecca Miller and Daniel Day-Lewis - The 85th Annual Oscars at Hollywood & Highland Center - Red Carpet Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

Kate Capshaw, Steven Spielberg, Daniel Day-Lewis and Rebecca Miller
Kate Capshaw, Steven Spielberg, Daniel Day-Lewis and Rebecca Miller

2013 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Sunset Tower - Arrivals

Daniel Day-Lewis and Rebecca Miller - 2013 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Sunset Tower - Arrivals - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

Daniel Day-Lewis
Daniel Day-Lewis
Daniel Day-Lewis

The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Review


Excellent
As a more emotional take on the themes examined in American Beauty, this internalised drama is subtle and unpredictable. It also features terrific performances from an eclectic cast.

Pippa (Wright) is married to the much-older Herb (Arkin), a publisher who hates that he's now retired. But it's Pippa whose world is starting to unravel, as she reaches the point where she needs more than being a trophy wife and mother to two now-grown kids (Kazan and McDonald). Her sleepwalking antics indicate that her subconscious has already figured this out, but it'll take a look at her childhood (played by Lively and youngster Madeline McNulty) to help her see what she needs to do next.

Continue reading: The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Review

Angela Review


Terrible
A 10-year-old Christian Scientist girl tries to convince her 6-year-old sister that Satan is watching them all the time. As hopelessly artsy as it sounds, this is just plain morose, self-indulgent, and pointless filmmaking.

Reissued on DVD to take advantage of writer/director Rebecca Miller's new cachet courtesy of Personal Velocity, this inauspicious debt longs to be Heavenly Creatures -- or less explicably, Like Water for Chocolate, is the DVD case heralds. Too bad it's a third-rate indie, well photographed but ultimately not worth watching for either its precocious stars or its ham-fisted stars.

Continue reading: Angela Review

Angela Review


Terrible
A 10-year-old Christian Scientist girl tries to convince her 6-year-old sister that Satan is watching them all the time. As hopelessly artsy as it sounds, this is just plain morose, self-indulgent, and pointless filmmaking.

Reissued on DVD to take advantage of writer/director Rebecca Miller's new cachet courtesy of Personal Velocity, this inauspicious debt longs to be Heavenly Creatures -- or less explicably, Like Water for Chocolate, is the DVD case heralds. Too bad it's a third-rate indie, well photographed but ultimately not worth watching for its precocious stars or its ham-fisted stars.

Continue reading: Angela Review

Personal Velocity Review


Excellent
Combining an excellent literary accent with eclectic reflection on life's perpetual habit of transitioning, Rebecca Miller's highly touted Personal Velocity comprises engaging three-dimensional Everywomen in compelling stories that end up surprisingly cinematic. Split into three portraits, each detailed enough to fill out characters that shy away from easy categorization, the 85 minutes of emotional endeavors may be painful but never bore.

First there's Delia (Kyra Sedgwick, consistently underrated for far too long), a tough cookie from hard knocks who must manage to break the cycle of family abuse without losing control in front of kids that have already seen Mommy cut down to size. Next is Greta (Parker Posey, fantastic in her most human role to date) who accidentally works her way up the corporate ladder, but also possibly out of a marriage that has lost all spark. Finally, Paula (Fairuza Balk, always interesting to watch) is living from one sign-from-above to the next after realizing she's pregnant.

Continue reading: Personal Velocity Review

Proof (2005) Review


Terrible
The Broadway hit Proof put playwright David Auburn's name on the map, earned him a shelf full of prizes (from Tony to Pulitzer), and reminded those of us who stopped paying attention that Mary-Louise Parker was a star. A movie adaptation was inevitable, though a drastic mishandling of the material was not.

Familiarity with Auburn's stage presentation may breed contempt for this version, which feels distinctly off-kilter from its first frames. Mysteries that held water longer in the theater instead land like Doc Marten's on a flimsy piece of plywood here. Director John Madden samples a chatty, analytical approach to his literal translation but gets swept up in stagy, awkward, and all-too-deliberate line readings. Much like last year's ill-conceived Phantom of the Opera, this movie has few cinematic qualities that elevate it above a tedious and emotionless play rehearsal shot on location.

Continue reading: Proof (2005) Review

The Ballad of Jack and Rose Review


Good
For some people isolation means happiness. Such is the case of Jack and Rose, father and daughter (Daniel Day-Lewis and Camilla Belle), living sparingly and deeply enjoying it on an island off the Pacific Northwest. In earlier days, it was the setting for a commune -- one that Jack built, led, and closed down as times and manias changed. Now, with the funds from a buyout in his bank account, his comforts are secure, and that's a bit of heaven for Rose who not only adores her father and cherishes her life, but will protect both with all her energy and life force.

A couple of problems threaten to spoil the remote idyll. Jack has a terminal heart condition and they both know his days are numbered. What each wants to do about it differs monumentally. For her part, Rose is devoted to the idea of committing suicide as soon as dad leaves his mortal coil, feeling she couldn't face life without him. In the wisdom of maturity and a wider scope of options, Jack would like to live out the remainder of his life with a companion who, at the same time, would become a replacement adult supervisor for teenager Rose when he's gone. Nice plan -- one that even a normal father might well dream up. And, since he's been dating Kathleen (Catherine Keener) during his rare visits to the mainland, and likes her, he asks her to come live with him and Rose.

Continue reading: The Ballad of Jack and Rose Review

Rebecca Miller

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