Ray Winstone Page 5

Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS

Ray Winstone - Actors Ray Winstone,Aneurin Barnard and Actor/Comedian Omid Djalili filming Sky TV's new Drama MoonFleet today at Kings Inn.Todays scene was a fight scene where Winstone and Barnard jump out of a window and are then involved in a fight.Winstone and Barnard also had a joke fight between takes while Omid Djalili played football with a stone rock from props. - Dublin, Ireland - Tuesday 25th June 2013

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone and Aneurin Barnard - Actors Ray Winstone andAneurin Barnard film scenes for Sky TV's new drama 'Moonfleet' at The Stags Head pub - Dublin, Ireland - Monday 24th June 2013

Ray Winstone and Aneurin Barnard
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone and Aneurin Barnard
Ray Winstone and Aneurin Barnard
Ray Winstone and Aneurin Barnard
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone - First days filming on the set of Sky Tv's new drama 'Moonfleet',starring Ray Winstone ,Aneurin Barnard,Ben Chaplin and Sophie Cookson. - Wicklow, Ireland - Monday 17th June 2013

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Guest and Ray Winstone Monday 3rd September 2012 The Sweeney UK film premiere held at the Vue cinema - arrivals.

Guest and Ray Winstone
Guest and Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone Monday 3rd September 2012 Ray Winstone at the premiere of The Sweeney at Vue, Leicester Square, London, England

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone Friday 31st August 2012 at talkSPORT's studios

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone Friday 25th May 2012 at the BBC Radio 2 studios

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone Monday 16th April 2012 Elfie Hopkins premiere held at the Vue cinema- Departures

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone - Ray Winstone and wife Elaine Winstone Monday 16th April 2012 Elfie Hopkins premiere held at the Vue cinema- Arrivals

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone and Brit Awards - Ray Winstone with his wife Elaine Winstone Tuesday 21st February 2012 The Brit Awards 2012 held at The O2 - Arrivals

Ray Winstone and Brit Awards
Ray Winstone and Brit Awards
Ray Winstone and Brit Awards
Ray Winstone and Brit Awards
Ray Winstone and Brit Awards
Ray Winstone and Brit Awards

Ray Winstone - Guest and Ray Winstone Essex, England - The Opening Night of 'Southend Film Festival' Thursday 28th April 2011

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone - Sunday 14th November 2010 at Grosvenor House London, England

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Amanda Lamb and Ray Winstone - Sunday 14th November 2010 at Grosvenor House The Variety Club Showbiz Awards 2010 at the Grosvenor House Hotel London, England

Amanda Lamb and Ray Winstone
Amanda Lamb and Kate Walsh
Amanda Lamb and Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone - Ray Winstone , London, England - The Variety Club Showbiz Awards 2010 - outside arrivals Sunday 14th November 2010

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone and Jaime Winstone

Rango Trailer


Rango is a chameleon who isn't particularly content living the life of the general chameleon, he sees himself as more of a hero figure, striving to protect those who need him; but when he finds himself in a western town called Dirt, Rango must start playing the role he's always dreamt of fulfilling, but once he's faced by bandits will he be able to keep up the charade?

Continue: Rango Trailer

Jaime Winstone and Ray Winstone - Jaime Winstone, Ray Winstone and Lois Winstone pose with the Outstanding Contribution to British Film award London, England - The Empire Film Awards 2010 - Press Room Sunday 28th March 2010

Jaime Winstone and Ray Winstone
Jaime Winstone
Jaime Winstone
Jaime Winstone and Lois Winstone
Jaime Winstone and Lois Winstone
Jaime Winstone and Ray Winstone

Lois Winstone and Ray Winstone - Lois Winstone, Jaime Winstone, Ray Winstone and Elaine Winstone Sunday 28th March 2010 at Grosvenor House London, England

Lois Winstone and Ray Winstone
Lois Winstone and Ray Winstone
Lois Winstone
Lois Winstone
Lois Winstone and Ray Winstone
Lois Winstone

Edge Of Darkness Review


OK
Based on the 1985 BBC TV series, also directed by Campbell, this dramatic thriller tries to pack so much into two hours that it ends up feeling thin and repetitive. But it's great to have Gibson back on screen.

Veteran Boston cop Thomas (Gibson) is trying to rebuild his relationship with his scientist daughter Emma (Novakovic) when she's viciously gunned down.

Everyone suspects Thomas was the real target, but his investigation leads him into a conspiracy involving her job with a monolithic defence contractor run by the shady Bennett (Huston). Then he meets government clean-up expert Jedburgh (Winstone) and starts to realise the extent of what's gong on. Can he blow the whistle before they rub him out too?

Continue reading: Edge Of Darkness Review

44 Inch Chest Review


Good
With its limited setting, contained cast and existential plot, this feels more like a play than a film. So while it's well-acted by a first-rate cast, it also feels somewhat indulgent and oddly unsatisfying.

Colin (Winstone) is a complete wreck after his wife Liz (Whalley) leaves him.

He's so distraught that his pals (Wilkinson, Hurt, McShane and Dillane) get together and kidnap the other man (Poupaud) so Colin can get his revenge. Now they're all in a disused house somewhere in London, as Colin's friends try to help him get control of his emotions. Flashbacks and fantasies ensue as Colin tries to figure out what to do, and whether an act of murderous violence will help soothe his soul.

Continue reading: 44 Inch Chest Review

Edge Of Darkness Trailer


Watch the trailer for Edge Of Darkness

Continue: Edge Of Darkness Trailer

44 Inch Chest Trailer


Watch the trailer for 44 Inch Chest

Continue: 44 Inch Chest Trailer

Ray Winstone Tuesday 6th October 2009 arrives at a Central London Hotel London, England

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone and his daughter Jaime - Ray Winstone and his daughter Jaime London, England - leave their hotel Tuesday 6th October 2009

Ray Winstone and His Daughter Jaime
Ray Winstone and His Daughter Jaime
Ray Winstone and His Daughter Jaime
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone Monday 5th October 2009 Pride of Britain Awards 2009 held at Grosvenor House Hotel - Arrivals London, England

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Indiana Jones And The Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull Review


Very Good
The great thing about the movies is that our heroes never age. We can keep going back to Chaplin, Newman, or Hepburn (either one), and with the exception of some dated slang, they remain as fresh as the day they stepped foot in front of the camera.

And so, when a bona fide classic character like Indiana Jones, last seen on the big screen 19 long years ago, makes his big return (with all the itinerant hype), fans of the series are faced with a painful mix of emotions. Of course there's joy: Another episode of what might be my favorite childhood movie series is a delightful prospect. But then there's despair: Indy may not age, but Harrison Ford does. Indiana Jones is no longer a spry young guy but a veritable senior citizen. And if Indiana Jones is old, that means I'm getting old, too.

Continue reading: Indiana Jones And The Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull Review

Ray Winstone - Ray Winstone and Cate Blanchett Sunday 18th May 2008 at Cannes Film Festival Cannes, France

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

John Hurt and Ray Winstone - John Hurt and Ray Winstone Cannes, France - walk along the Croisette during day 4 of The 2008 Cannes Film Festival Saturday 17th May 2008

John Hurt and Ray Winstone
John Hurt and His Wife Ann Rees Meyers
John Hurt and Ray Winstone
Ann Rees Meyers and John Hurt
Ann Rees Meyers and John Hurt
Ann Rees Meyers and John Hurt

Ray Winstone Monday 12th May 2008 Ray Winstone at the Dorchester London, England

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone - Wednesday 28th November 2007 at The Roundhouse London, England

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone and Elaine Winstone

Beowulf Review


OK
From the advent of sound with 1927's The Jazz Singer to the computer-generated effects breakthrough of 1989's The Abyss -- advancements in technology have had a major impact on cinematic storytelling, for better and worse. New technologies open up more cinematic experiences and new avenues for directors and actors to explore their craft. But it's easy to get caught up in the razzmatazz of the latest spectacle, instead of focusing on age-old, tried and true thematic substance. And that's exactly Beowulf's tragic flaw.

The Beowulf legend originates from a 700 A.D. oral tradition that was adapted in epic poem form by the English and into film form by director Robert Zemeckis -- using motion-captured live-action performances that are turned into a computer-generated light show. Much like the IMAX 3D screenings of Zemeckis' previous effort, The Polar Express, Beowulf's tale of a hero who comes to rid a Scandinavian village of its monster, while screaming his name every chance he gets, is more a showcase for RealD technology than an engaging film.

Continue reading: Beowulf Review

Ray Winstone Sunday 11th November 2007 , London, England

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone Sunday 11th November 2007 UK premiere of 'Beowulf' held at the Vue Leicester Square - Arrivals London, England

Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone
Ray Winstone

Breaking And Entering Review


Weak
Bathed in browns and tans and coursing with pent-up socioeconomic ponderings, Anthony Minghella's gentrification hiccup Breaking and Entering joins a rather terminal genre of films that want to have their cake and eat it too. Balancing a fumbling love triangle and a plethora of misconceived notions on class structure, Minghella has confined himself to an intimate story that betrays his often loftier ambitions.

A string of robberies has plagued the ghetto of King's Cross in London. The thievery seems to be centered on an architecture firm that (no surprise) is trying to clean up and reconstruct the famed slum into something more suitable for London's middle-class. Headed by pretty boy Will (Jude Law) and scruffy Sandy (Martin Freeman), the company has an internal conflict on whether it was a member of the cleaning staff (that Sandy is sweet on) or outside burglars that committed the crimes. While attempting his own makeshift stakeout, Will spots the young robber and jumps out of his posh SUV to chase him. It leads him to the home of Amira (the luminous Juliette Binoche), a survivor of the horrors of Bosnia who yearns to return to Sarajevo with her son Miro (Rafi Gavron), the thief in question.

Continue reading: Breaking And Entering Review

Breaking And Entering Review


Weak
Bathed in browns and tans and coursing with pent-up socioeconomic ponderings, Anthony Minghella's gentrification hiccup Breaking and Entering joins a rather terminal genre of films that want to have their cake and eat it too. Balancing a fumbling love triangle and a plethora of misconceived notions on class structure, Minghella has confined himself to an intimate story that betrays his often loftier ambitions.A string of robberies has plagued the ghetto of King's Cross in London. The thievery seems to be centered on an architecture firm that (no surprise) is trying to clean up and reconstruct the famed slum into something more suitable for London's middle-class. Headed by pretty boy Will (Jude Law) and scruffy Sandy (Martin Freeman), the company has an internal conflict on whether it was a member of the cleaning staff (that Sandy is sweet on) or outside burglars that committed the crimes. While attempting his own makeshift stakeout, Will spots the young robber and jumps out of his posh SUV to chase him. It leads him to the home of Amira (the luminous Juliette Binoche), a survivor of the horrors of Bosnia who yearns to return to Sarajevo with her son Miro (Rafi Gavron), the thief in question.While he is away from his wife Liv (Robin Wright Penn) and borderline-autistic stepdaughter Bea (Poppy Rogers), Will takes coffee with a Russian prostitute (Vera Farmiga) while warming up for a rather awkward affair with Amira. The affair is about bourgeois guilt and escape for him, but for her it's a way of securing her son from a life in jail and keeping him away from the local coppers, led by the reliable Ray Winstone.Replacing regular cinematographer John Seal, the masterful Benoît Delhomme (The Proposition, What Time Is It There?) gives this panorama of class and relations an inebriated tone of mystique. That's half the problem: King's Cross has no real sense of danger or of any sort of differentiation of class, visually speaking. Catcalls of "better watch out" or "shouldn't be wearing those duds round here, mate" become rather pathetic signals of danger when Will chases Miro through the underbelly of the "slum." This also puts a lot of stress on Binoche and Gavron: If their surroundings don't communicate the class difference, the actors have to. Binoche has become an actress so malleable in her talents and appearance that it's often hard to categorize her. The fit, stressed mom in Michael Haneke's superb Cache has given way to a slightly chubbier, East-European-accented mother hen with drab clothing and a strongly felt love for her son and his future.Binoche is the heart of the film, and the scenery and mood matches her, ironically, up until Amira and Will's affair begins. The dazed atmosphere of the film becomes gelatinous, giving the class struggle a somewhat hollow resonance. The descents of all the characters (Liv is Scandinavian) becomes a point of order in the film's context but it's never given any sort of importance to offer the narrative a sense of intricacy. Even more so, Sandy's yearning and ultimate disappointment with his lower-class cleaning lady hints at a more developed and poignant representation of bourgeois ethos, but it's never developed past the films first 30 minutes. So, instead, the cultural clash is restricted to pale shades of white, and any sort of challenging critique of modern status and stratum is widely averted. Not quite a misdemeanor, but definitely nothing to celebrate.Is your refridgerator running?

The Departed Review


Excellent

Just as Spike Lee took a basic caper and added his own pet issues to elevate Inside Man to the upper echelons of its genre, Martin Scorsese has taken The Departed, based on an intriguingly simple premise, to its own heights by infusing issues that have concerned him ever since Mean Streets. Along the way, he makes room for some memorable performances, not the least of which comes from the most likely of sources.

The Departed is based on the Hong Kong blockbuster Infernal Affairs, in which a cop goes undercover in the mob while the mob places one of their own as a mole in the police force. In Scorsese's version, the scene shifts to Boston, where mob boss Frank Costello (Jack Nicholson) puts loyal-from-boyhood employee Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon) through police training. As Sullivan rises through the ranks, Special Investigations Unit chiefs Queenan (Martin Sheen) and Dignam (Mark Wahlberg) recruit rookie Billy Costigan (Leonardo DiCaprio) to get "kicked off" the force and do time to gain Costello's confidence.

All of this happens before the opening titles.

Continue reading: The Departed Review

The Proposition Review


Excellent

The opening of John Hillcoat's The Proposition wastes no time getting you in the mood. Four or five criminals are being shot at in a small shack and quickly answer back with ample fire power. Blood spurts everywhere, and two Asian prostitutes are quickly disposed of.

It's the 1880s: Dirt and dust are on the rise and hygiene is sadly in decline. The Burns brothers have been split up: Eddie (Danny Huston) has run off into the desert caves of Australia while Charlie (Guy Pearce) and Mike (Richard Wilson) have gotten snagged in a gunfight. The captain of the local English sheriffs, Captain Stanley (a brooding Ray Winstone), has ordered the hanging of Mike but tells Charlie that if he kills Eddie, he will turn them both free.

Continue reading: The Proposition Review

The War Zone Review


Weak
Incest. Treachery. Betrayal. Videotape.

No, I'm not talking about the new version of Hamlet. I'm talking about The War Zone, a 21st century Kitchen Sink drama helmed by Brit actor-who-should-stay-an-actor Tim Roth.

Continue reading: The War Zone Review

Face (1997) Review


Weak
Tepid and only partially comprehensible, Robert Carlisle's British bankrobbers-gone-awry flick is disappointing on so many levels, but largely the fault lies with the script's pro-Socialist commentary that inserts chatty monologues into every scene. Snooze. Not surprising, considering Antonia Bird's work has been headed steadily downhill since 1994's Priest. (Of course, how will we ever forget the tagline, "The blag to kill for. Only one of them meant it for real.")

Love, Honour And Obey Review


OK
A gangster movie with a sarcastic slant, Love, Honour and Obey seeks to entertain without mental stimulation. It's not The Godfather or The Sopranos, but instead a loose string of scenes brought together in bits and spurts to tell a simple story.

Ray (Ray Winstone, Nil By Mouth and The War Zone) is the boss of the south London mob. Jude (Jude Law, The Talented Mr. Ripley and eXistenZ) is his obedient nephew, and Jonny (Jonny Lee Miller, Afterglow and Trainspotting) is Jude's buddy who wants a piece of the action. Once Jude gets Jonny invited to take part in the proceedings, he gets a little big for his britches, causing trouble with the north London blokes.

Continue reading: Love, Honour And Obey Review

Ripley's Game Review


Very Good
Did this movie ever come out theatrically? I would have at least thought it would have found its way here on video, but no, I discovered Ripley's Game on IFC, of all places. This follow-up to The Talented Mr. Ripley (no cast or crew involved, but it's based on another Patricia Highsmith book (the third of five) about Tom Ripley) stars John Malkovich in the role of the older Ripley, this time working as a forged art dealer and relatively callous, spare-time murderer. Ripley convinces a dying man (Dougray Scott) to commit a murder for him, after which all hell breaks loose. Malkovich steals the show and director Liliana Cavani (The Night Porter) does a perfectly serviceable job. See also The American Friend -- Malkovich makes a way better Ripley than Dennis Hopper.

Last Orders Review


Very Good
It's a shame there are so few films out that realistically portray male bonding, possibly for fear of assuming an underlying current of latent homosexuality. The oft-neglected theme is pleasantly explored in Last Orders, a journey of three old pals who must bury the fourth of their circle. Unfortunately, while admirable in intent, it also follows several predictable plot patterns that are only saved by the talented cast.

Jack (Michael Caine) has recently died, leaving in his wake a widow, two children, and three close friends. His last wish is that lifelong companions Vic (Tom Courtenay), Lenny (David Hemmings), and Ray (Bob Hoskins) throw him out to sea at the honeymoon spot he shared with wife Amy (Helen Mirren). His son, Vince (Ray Winstone), joins them.

Continue reading: Last Orders Review

Final Cut (1998) Review


Weak
Premise: All actors play characters named after (and loosely based on) themselves.

Jude (Jude Law) is dead. His final words have been left via videotape, which is rolled at his funeral. What's on the tape? Why, Jude has somehow recorded his friends in the worst of situations: peeing, stealing things from each other, banging hookers, cross-dressing, and worse. The funeral guests then stammer and backpedal and make excuses for their actions.

Continue reading: Final Cut (1998) Review

The Very Thought Of You Review


Very Good
Nearly overwhelming in its cuteness, The Very Thought of You tells the wholly unlikely story of an American (Potter) on the run from her unbearably dull life. When she flies to London on a lark, she encounters three British guys in the space of 48 hours, all of whom fall in love with her immediately. The catch? The three are all best friends.

Joseph Fiennes is the lovable one of the bunch, and naturally he and Potter are destined for one another. But Fiennes' friendship with his two pals (Sewell and Hollander) keeps him a dark horse in the game. Will he go for the girl or not? And what will she do when she finds out they're all pals?

Continue reading: The Very Thought Of You Review

Nil By Mouth Review


Terrible
Categorically one of the worst films ever made, Gary Oldman's meditation on gritty urban drug-abusing/wife-beating life is never poignant or impressive, unless you consider jerky camerawork a sign of genius. The violence, foul language, and drug use all serve no purpose except to generate more violence, foul language, and drug use -- and that hardly merits a film. It just goes to show that if you get famous enough, you can do whatever you want. I just didn't know Oldman was this famous.

Cold Mountain Review


Weak

From the very first words of its opening voice-over, inwhich a detectable trace of Aussie inflection invades Nicole Kidman's affectedSouthern accent, there's something amiss with "Cold Mountain,"a two-and-a-half-hour Civil War epic built around a lackluster love story,written and directed by an Englishman, starring half a dozen British actorsand shot in Romania.

Sweeping in scope, the picture's earnest intentions, periodatmosphere and cinematic beauty are above reproach as it portrays brutal,bloody, brother-against-brother battlefields and a North Carolina home-fronthamlet where prim, city-bred newcomer Ada Monroe (Nicole Kidman) waitsfor the return of her soldier sweetheart while struggling to survive onher dead father's farm.

And yet, the emotional investment in the characters issomething less than sweeping. The passionless decorum of Ada's first-reelcourtship by the adoring but reticent Inman (Jude Law), the declarationof war which cuts short their time together, and the questionable castingof Kidman -- who at 36 is too old to be credible as a bashful unmarriedbelle in 1864 Dixie -- result in a lack of validity and vitality that isn'tremedied until the invigorating second-act arrival of Renee Zellweger.

Continue reading: Cold Mountain Review

Sexy Beast Review


Very Good

Director Jonathan Glazer does such a spectacular job of drawing the audience into the world he creates in the edgy, oily and feral British crime thriller "Sexy Beast" that within moments of its opening -- poolside at a retired bank robber's modest desert villa on the Spanish Costa del Sol -- you may actually start fanning yourself from the 100-degree weather on screen.

It's the kind of vicarious reaction felt over and over again through the course of the movie. You truly understand the intense devotion between the ex-con Gary "Gal" Dove (played by the awesome Ray Winstone) and his aging ex-porn queen wife (Amanda Redman). You savor Gal's utterly relaxed bliss at finally living in a world far, far away from his former life. You feel how much he enjoys the company of pal and former associate Aitch (Cavan Kendall) and his wife (Julianne White), who live near by and often come over for barbecue.

But more than anything, you feel in your bones how completely terrified every last one of them is of Don Logan.

Continue reading: Sexy Beast Review

Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Ray Winstone

Date of birth

19th February, 1957

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.78


Advertisement
Advertisement

Ray Winstone Movies

Jawbone Movie Review

Jawbone Movie Review

Boxing movies aren't usually this thoughtful. Sure, there are plenty of punchy moments in the...

Point Break - 2015 Trailer

Point Break - 2015 Trailer

Johnny Utah rarely lets his professional life as a promising new FBI recruit cross over...

Zipper Trailer

Zipper Trailer

Sam Ellis is a high-flying United States Attorney looking at a likely rise to the...

Point Break (2015) - Teaser  Trailer

Point Break (2015) - Teaser Trailer

Johnny Utah is a young new agent in the FBI who also happens to be...

The Gunman Movie Review

The Gunman Movie Review

While Sean Penn lends this thriller some political subtext, the fact remains that it's actually...

The Gunman Trailer

The Gunman Trailer

He's worked for the same company for years, and one day he is asked to...

20,000 Days on Earth Movie Review

20,000 Days on Earth Movie Review

Far from the standard biographical documentary, this is a strikingly artistic exploration of the life...

Advertisement
20,000 Days On Earth Trailer

20,000 Days On Earth Trailer

In true Nick Cave style, the lines between real-life and fiction are blurred in a...

Noah Movie Review

Noah Movie Review

Darren Aronofsky continues to ambitiously experiment with genres in this Old Testament blockbuster, but this...

Noah Trailer

Noah Trailer

The cast and crew of ‘Noah’; director Darren Aronofsky, actors Russell Crowe and Emma Watson,...

Noah Trailer

Noah Trailer

Noah is a normal family man faced with major responsibility when his dark visions lead...

Noah Trailer

Noah Trailer

When Noah is faced with a dark message from God thanks to his gift of...

The Sweeney Movie Review

The Sweeney Movie Review

The iconic 1970s British TV series gets the big screen treatment from crime-drama aficionado Nick...

Snow White and the Huntsman Movie Review

Snow White and the Huntsman Movie Review

There's an oddly over-serious tone to this fairy tale, as if the filmmakers thought they...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.