Rafi Gavron

Rafi Gavron

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Snitch Review


Good

Dwayne Johnson tries to flex his acting muscles in this smarter-than-usual action movie, based on a true story that gets under our skin. He's never played someone as fragile as this, which is fascinating even if the film ultimately can't resist cranking up the action while turning rather preachy.

Johnson plays John, a construction company owner whose bright 18-year-old son Jason (Gavron) is caught in a drugs sting by an undercover agent (Pepper). Jason is facing 10 years in prison, and offered a way out if he can finger another drug dealer. But he doesn't know any, since he was set up himself. So John makes a deal with a federal prosecutor (Sarandon) to find a big dealer himself. He convinces reluctant ex-con employee Daniel (Bernthal) to work with him, contacting a local dealer (Williams) before going after the kingpin (Bratt). But of course things get increasingly dangerous the deeper they go.

While Johnson's acting chops aren't terribly subtle, he's such a charismatic screen presence that we are fully engaged with him from the start. The tender scenes between him and Gavron add weight to the whole story, while the tetchy connection between him and Bernthal keeps the film on a knife edge. By contrast, Sarandon and Pepper are pretty much just scene-stealing sharks using innocent people to do their dirty work.

Continue reading: Snitch Review

Celeste and Jesse Forever Trailer


Celeste and Jesse have been best friends since high school and married each other very young. Many years later, they have reached their thirties and while Celeste is a successful business woman, Jesse has failed to mature with age and remains unemployed and unmotivated. Celeste believes the right thing to do is to file for a divorce as her life progresses away from him. He agrees, although he still loves her, but the pair remain inseparable friends as they begin to see other people. They are told that they should start dating again if they are unwilling to let each other go, however, Jesse soon finds another girl to fall in love with and Celeste's world comes crashing down around her as she realises she's made a huge mistake. As everything begins to warp and change in their lives, they start to learn that they may have to abandon their precious friendship in order for their hearts to heal.

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Picture - John Savage and Blanca Blanco , Thursday 21st June 2012

John Savage and Rafi Gavron - John Savage and Blanca Blanco Thursday 21st June 2012 2012 Los Angeles Film Festival - Celeste And Jesse Forever - After Party

Picture - Rashida Jones, Rafi Gavron , Thursday 21st June 2012

Rashida Jones and Rafi Gavron - Rashida Jones, Rafi Gavron Thursday 21st June 2012 2012 Los Angeles Film Festival - Celeste And Jesse Forever - After Party

Rashida Jones and Rafi Gavron
Rashida Jones and Rafi Gavron
Rashida Jones and Rafi Gavron
Rashida Jones and Rafi Gavron

Picture - Rafi Gavron , Thursday 21st June 2012

Rafi Gavron Thursday 21st June 2012 2012 Los Angeles Film Festival - Celeste And Jesse Forever - After Party

Rafi Gavron
Rafi Gavron

Picture - Matthew Rhys, Rafi Gavron, Max... , Thursday 21st June 2012

Matthew Rhys, Max Minghella, Rafi Gavron and Los Angeles Film Festival - Matthew Rhys, Rafi Gavron, Max Minghella Thursday 21st June 2012 2012 Los Angeles Film Festival - Celeste And Jesse Forever - After Party

The Cold Light Of Day Trailer


Will Shaw is a young Wall Street trader, who comes from a well off family. One summer, they all decide to holiday in Spain, on their yacht. Will meets them at the airport and they head to their boat together.

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Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist Review


OK
Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist is a high school fantasy for indie rock nerds.

Imagine if back when you were 17, instead of playing CDs in your bedroom and dreaming about getting up the nerve to talk to a girl or guy, you played bass in a punk band that performed gigs in New York City. After your show, you hopped around the Lower East Side with a cute girl who knew all your favorite I-liked-'em-first bands, and who could get you into any club in town. You and she and your buddies partied until dawn with nary a care for the consequences, the law, or your parents.

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Breaking And Entering Review


Grim
Bathed in browns and tans and coursing with pent-up socioeconomic ponderings, Anthony Minghella's gentrification hiccup Breaking and Entering joins a rather terminal genre of films that want to have their cake and eat it too. Balancing a fumbling love triangle and a plethora of misconceived notions on class structure, Minghella has confined himself to an intimate story that betrays his often loftier ambitions.

A string of robberies has plagued the ghetto of King's Cross in London. The thievery seems to be centered on an architecture firm that (no surprise) is trying to clean up and reconstruct the famed slum into something more suitable for London's middle-class. Headed by pretty boy Will (Jude Law) and scruffy Sandy (Martin Freeman), the company has an internal conflict on whether it was a member of the cleaning staff (that Sandy is sweet on) or outside burglars that committed the crimes. While attempting his own makeshift stakeout, Will spots the young robber and jumps out of his posh SUV to chase him. It leads him to the home of Amira (the luminous Juliette Binoche), a survivor of the horrors of Bosnia who yearns to return to Sarajevo with her son Miro (Rafi Gavron), the thief in question.

Continue reading: Breaking And Entering Review

Breaking And Entering Review


Grim
Bathed in browns and tans and coursing with pent-up socioeconomic ponderings, Anthony Minghella's gentrification hiccup Breaking and Entering joins a rather terminal genre of films that want to have their cake and eat it too. Balancing a fumbling love triangle and a plethora of misconceived notions on class structure, Minghella has confined himself to an intimate story that betrays his often loftier ambitions.A string of robberies has plagued the ghetto of King's Cross in London. The thievery seems to be centered on an architecture firm that (no surprise) is trying to clean up and reconstruct the famed slum into something more suitable for London's middle-class. Headed by pretty boy Will (Jude Law) and scruffy Sandy (Martin Freeman), the company has an internal conflict on whether it was a member of the cleaning staff (that Sandy is sweet on) or outside burglars that committed the crimes. While attempting his own makeshift stakeout, Will spots the young robber and jumps out of his posh SUV to chase him. It leads him to the home of Amira (the luminous Juliette Binoche), a survivor of the horrors of Bosnia who yearns to return to Sarajevo with her son Miro (Rafi Gavron), the thief in question.While he is away from his wife Liv (Robin Wright Penn) and borderline-autistic stepdaughter Bea (Poppy Rogers), Will takes coffee with a Russian prostitute (Vera Farmiga) while warming up for a rather awkward affair with Amira. The affair is about bourgeois guilt and escape for him, but for her it's a way of securing her son from a life in jail and keeping him away from the local coppers, led by the reliable Ray Winstone.Replacing regular cinematographer John Seal, the masterful BenoƮt Delhomme (The Proposition, What Time Is It There?) gives this panorama of class and relations an inebriated tone of mystique. That's half the problem: King's Cross has no real sense of danger or of any sort of differentiation of class, visually speaking. Catcalls of "better watch out" or "shouldn't be wearing those duds round here, mate" become rather pathetic signals of danger when Will chases Miro through the underbelly of the "slum." This also puts a lot of stress on Binoche and Gavron: If their surroundings don't communicate the class difference, the actors have to. Binoche has become an actress so malleable in her talents and appearance that it's often hard to categorize her. The fit, stressed mom in Michael Haneke's superb Cache has given way to a slightly chubbier, East-European-accented mother hen with drab clothing and a strongly felt love for her son and his future.Binoche is the heart of the film, and the scenery and mood matches her, ironically, up until Amira and Will's affair begins. The dazed atmosphere of the film becomes gelatinous, giving the class struggle a somewhat hollow resonance. The descents of all the characters (Liv is Scandinavian) becomes a point of order in the film's context but it's never given any sort of importance to offer the narrative a sense of intricacy. Even more so, Sandy's yearning and ultimate disappointment with his lower-class cleaning lady hints at a more developed and poignant representation of bourgeois ethos, but it's never developed past the films first 30 minutes. So, instead, the cultural clash is restricted to pale shades of white, and any sort of challenging critique of modern status and stratum is widely averted. Not quite a misdemeanor, but definitely nothing to celebrate.Is your refridgerator running?
Rafi Gavron

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