Rachelle Lefevre

Rachelle Lefevre

Rachelle Lefevre Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

24th Annual Environmental Media Awards

Snaps of a variety of stars as they arrived at the 24th Annual Environmental Media Awards presented by Toyota and Lexus at the Warner Bros Studio

Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre

British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Los Angeles TV Tea

Rachelle Lefevre - British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Los Angeles TV Tea presented by BBC and Jaguar at SLS Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 23rd August 2014

Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre

San Diego Comic-Con International - Day 1

Rachelle Lefevre - San Diego Comic-Con International - Day 1 - Celebrity arrivals - San Diego, California, United States - Thursday 24th July 2014

Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre

"Under The Dome" Season Premiere Recap: The Death Of Logic (And Several Characters)


Mike Vogel Rachelle Lefevre

CBS’s Under the Dome returned on Monday night and if there’s one moral to take away from the season premiere is that no one is ever safe on TV. Ever. As always, spoilers below.

Under The Dome
The more things change, the more they stay the same under the dome.

In the very first week of Season 2, we lost Sheriff Linda Esquivel (Natalie Martinez), who was killed by an SUV – or at least that’s how it seemed until she reappeared later and spoke to Big Jim Rennie (Dean Norris), who interpreted her communication as a message from the dome. Another goner, Dodee (Jolene Purdy), also came back to haunt Big Jim.

Continue reading: "Under The Dome" Season Premiere Recap: The Death Of Logic (And Several Characters)

CBS Television Studios 'Summer Soiree'

Rachelle Lefevre - CBS Television Studios 'Summer Soiree' held at The London Hotel in West Hollywood - Arrivals - West Hollywood, California, United States - Monday 19th May 2014

Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre
Rachelle Lefevre

Homefront Review


Weak

With a powerhouse cast and an anaemic script, this violent revenge thriller never quite gets off the ground. It's watchable for the character detail, but resolutely refuses to make any logical sense as it charges through its corny plot. Fortunately the slick filmmaking and charismatic acting hold our attention, adding a hint of sophistication to the bluntly brutal story.

It's set in the Louisiana bayou, where former undercover agent Phil (Statham) is trying to have a quiet life with his young daughter (Vidovic). But the locals are wary of outsiders, and a schoolyard confrontation escalates into a feud between Phil and a resentful woman (Bosworth) who calls her gangster brother Gator (Franco) for help in getting even. Gator quickly discovers Phil's past, then enlists his trashy pal Sheryl (Ryder) to contact Phil's old enemies. But as these ruthless thugs descend on the bayou, they fail to take into consideration the fact that Phil has nearly super-human fighting skills.

There's plenty of possibility in this rather tired premise, but Stallone's boneheaded script never bothers to make things believable, skipping over key details and indulging in trite coincidences. Fleder manages to obscure this with his fluid, pacey direction, and the cast is unusually good for such a simplistic thriller. The charismatic Statham doesn't stretch himself much, occasionally attempting a bit of real acting in the father-daughter scenes (his romance with LeFevre's teacher is never developed). Bosworth and Ryder add some unpredictable edges to their stereotypical roles. And it's Franco who steals the film as an unusually thoughtful redneck thug. Although his moral quandary doesn't put off any of the nastiness.

Continue reading: Homefront Review

Stephen King's 'Under The Dome' "Could Be Just What We've Needed"


Stephen King Aisha Hinds Mike Vogel Kevin Bacon Rachelle Lefevre

Stephen King's novel Under the Dome, adapted into a miniseries, aired yesterday (June 25, 2013) in the US and has been met with favourable reviews. The horror writer's 2009 novel had a huge audience of 13.1 million viewers and is likely to continue filming until September. Owing to its initial popularity, it is possible CBS could fund further episodes. 

The pilot episode introduces the audience to the bizarre Maine town of Chester's Mill, an area which is trapped in a bubble from which the residents cannot escape. With a healthy dose of a mysterious murder; a plane crash and many of the residents suffering convulsions it's definitely Stephen King's style. 

Under The Dome is CBS' latest attempt to compete with rival networks who offer such series as The Following and Revolution. The cast of Under the Dome may not match up to the likes of Kevin Bacon (in The Following) but Joanne Ostrow of the Denver Post comments on the suitability of mixing 'veteran actors and fresh new faces'.  

Continue reading: Stephen King's 'Under The Dome' "Could Be Just What We've Needed"

CBS's The Dome Is Less Thriller And More Formula


Mike Vogel Rachelle Lefevre

The premise of CBS’s brand new Stephen King adaptation, Under the Dome, is a familiar one – take a group of people with clashing personalities and a whole lot of secrets, lock them up together and see what happens. What has happened so far is an okay pilot for what is going to be a summer mini-series, based on the eponymous 2009 King novel.

While the first hour of the horror/drama doesn’t really have a lot to offer in terms of plot, we’re willing to explain that away with the necessary exposition. What Under the Dome seems to offer (besides some thoroughly entertaining footage of a cow and several houses sliced in half) is a tale of middle class mediocrity breaking down under the threat of apocalyptic mayhem. And really, with the slew of zombie films, disaster films and various apocalyptic interpretations across all forms of media, we’ve seen quite a lot of that already. At some point the breakdown of society ceases to be an entertaining plot and becomes a cliché. What’s supposed to bring some flavor to the somewhat bland series is the weight of the secrets most of the characters are hiding.

In the first episode, we see the show’s immediate villain, “Barbi” (Mike Vogel) bury a body and try to get out of town – only to be stopped by the dome dropping, of course. He then goes on to make government jokes and disrupt the discussion, which doesn’t really go beyond the “Oh no, what do?” stage in the first episode. Still, most of the pilot’s flaws are typical of a first episode and Under the Dome might still build up to an exciting resolution by the end of the series. In case you feel like catching an episode or two, the show airs Monday at 10PM on CBS.

Continue reading: CBS's The Dome Is Less Thriller And More Formula

Stephen King Adaptation 'Under The Dome' Will Star Twilight's Rachelle Lefevre


Rachelle Lefevre Stephen King Steven Spielberg Dean Norris Aisha Hinds Mike Vogel

Rachelle Lefevre will be joining the new CBS sci-fi drama Under the Dome, according to The Hollywood Reporter. The Twilight star is pegged to play the role of Julia, an investigative reporter who has recently moved to Chetser’s Mill, from Chicago. Once there, she and the rest of Chester’s Mill’s inhabitants, finds herself dealing with the “post apocalyptic conditions” that arise when a “strange dome” encapsulates the entire town.

With the show based on Stephen King’s popular novel, Julia is the editor of the town’s local paper and her curiosity is sparked by the news that multiple deliveries of propane gas had been made to a local warehouse. The appearance of the dome has her confused, though the disappearance of her husband – the local doctor – has her even more concerned. The drama is due to be produced by CBS Television studios and was taken straight to series, in association with Steven Spielberg’s own Amblin Television. Working as executive producers on the show will be Neal Baer, Darryl Frank, Justin Falvey, Stacey Snider and Brian K Vaughan. The premiere episode of the series will also feature Lost’s Jack Bender as executive producer.

The cast will also include Dean Norris (Breaking Bad), Mike Vogel (Pan Am) and Aisha Hinds (True Blood). Her casting in Under the Dome marks a return to CBS for Lefevre, who previously worked with them on A Gifted Man. The show is scheduled to premiere on June 24, 2013. 

Continue reading: Stephen King Adaptation 'Under The Dome' Will Star Twilight's Rachelle Lefevre

Barney's Version Review


Good
Based on the novel by Mordecai Richler, this film traces some 35 years in the life of its central character. More observational than plot-driven, its real strengths lie in performances that vividly draw out everyday emotions.

Barney Panofsky (Giamatti) has had an event-filled life that not many people quite understand. His first marriage to Clara (Lefevre) in 1970s Rome was short, but his second back home in Montreal (to Driver) was even briefer, as he met wife No 3, Miriam (Pike), at the reception. His later years are haunted by a detective (Addy) who's determined to prove that Barney killed his best friend (Speedman) back in the 80s. And then there's his feisty dad (Dustin Hoffman), smart kids (Jake Hoffman and Hopkins) and a too-friendly neighbour (Greenwood).

Continue reading: Barney's Version Review

Head In The Clouds Review


Grim

A handsome misfire of romanticized misfortune and decadence, war and idealism, tragedy and melodrama, "Head in the Clouds" aspires to be a sweetly risqué twist on the spirit of "Casablanca." But miscast leads and ersatz emotions leave the film's soundstagey period ambiance as its most comparable asset.

Underwhelming, accent-wavering Stuart Townsend ("Queen of the Damned") stars as Guy, an aspiring young writer and political idealist who comes under the spell of Gilda (Charlize Theron), a magnetically reckless woman who lives for the moment and for pleasure, believing she's doomed to die at 34 (as per an opening-scene palm reading). Passionate but uncommitted lovers at Cambridge in the early 1930s, they meet again in Paris just before the German occupation, where their disparate values in sex and life lead their renewed affair into tumultuous territory.

Townsend and Theron (a couple in real life) are wrong for their parts, both of which call for actors who can wear their intellects on their sleeves for confrontations that are at once lusty, emotionally raw and political in nature. More appropriately cast is Penelope Cruz as Mia, another of Gilda's lovers and a sexy Spanish dancer who became crippled, then turned to nursing in the hopes of returning to her country to serve in its republican revolution.

Continue reading: Head In The Clouds Review

Rachelle Lefevre

Rachelle Lefevre Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS