Rachel Weisz Page 6

Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Comments Quotes RSS

Rachel Weisz - Variety's Power of Women: New York luncheon - Manhattan, New York, United States - Friday 24th April 2015

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Lena Dunham and Rachel Weisz - Variety's Power of Women: New York luncheon at Cipriani Midtown in New York City - New York City, New York, United States - Friday 24th April 2015

Lena Dunham and Rachel Weisz
Lena Dunham
Lena Dunham
Lena Dunham
Lena Dunham and Rachel Weisz
Lena Dunham

Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz - Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz seen filming scenes for the movie 'The Lobster' at Joel's Restaurant on the Naas Road. - Dublin, Ireland - Tuesday 6th May 2014

Colin Farrell and Rachel Weisz
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Colin Farrell
Claudine Farrell and Colin Farrell

Rachel Weisz - On the set of Giorgos Lanthimos movie 'The Lobster'. A love story set in a dystopian near future where single people are arrested and transferred to a creepy hotel. There they are obliged to find a matching mate in 45 days. - Dublin, Ireland - Monday 5th May 2014

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz - Mandatory credit: I Heart Studio - Wednesday 6th November 2013

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz - Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz leaving The Barrymore Theatre after their performance in 'Betrayal' - New York City, NY, United States - Thursday 3rd October 2013

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz - "OZ The Great And Powerful" - Los Angeles Premiere - Arrivals - Hollywood, California, USA - Wednesday 13th February 2013

Rachel Weisz

Christina Aquilera and Rachel Weisz - TIME 100 Gala TIME'S 100 Most Influential People In The World at Jazz at Lincoln Center- Inside Arrivals Featuring: Christina Aquilera Where: New York City, New York , United States When: 23 Apr 2013 Credit: Andres Otero/WENN.com"OZ The Great And Powerful" - Los Angeles Premiere - Arrivals - New York City, New York , United States - Tuesday 23rd April 2013

Christina Aquilera and Rachel Weisz

Lara Spencer and Rachel Weisz - Rachel Weisz at ABC Studios for 'Good Morning America' - New York City, NY, United States - Friday 8th March 2013

Lara Spencer and Rachel Weisz
Lara Spencer

Rachel Weisz - 'OZ the Great and Powerful' European Premiere held at the Empire, Leicester Square - Departures - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 28th February 2013

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz - OZ The Great And Powerful Premiere - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 13th February 2013

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel - Red Carpet Featuring: Rachel Weisz Where: Los Angeles, CA, United States When: 13 Jan 2013

Rachel Weisz and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Rachel Weisz and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Rachel Weisz and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals Featuring: Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz Where: Beverly Hills, California, United States When: 13 Jan 2013

Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Rachel Weisz New York, United States 2012 New York Film Critics Circle Awards at Crimson - Outside Arrivals Monday 7th January 2013

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

The New York Critics Predict The Oscars? Then Kathryn Bigelow Can Start Celebrating


Kathryn Bigelow Sally Field Daniel Day Lewis Matthew Mcconaughey Meryl Streep Philip Seymour Hoffman Rachel Weisz Jennifer Lawrence Ben Affleck

Awards season got into full swing in New York last night (December 3, 2012), with the NY Film Critics Circle ceremony rewarding the best movies and performances of the year. Though the Golden Globes is considered a key barometer for the Oscars, it's been the New York awards' show that has correctly predicted the Academy Awards winners in recent years. For example, it named The Artist as Best Picture before it had stepped up its Oscars campaign in 2011, it rewarded Meryl Streep for The Iron Lady and crowned The Hurt Locker before it beat Avatar to the biggest prize of them all.

So what do Monday's results tell us about the Oscars race? Well, firstly, that Les Miserables might be in trouble after not picking up a single award. Musical movies have never found much success at the critics' awards, though Anne Hathaway was tipped to win Best Supporting Actress - it went to Lincoln's Sally Field instead. Daniel Day-Lewis won Best Actor, as he's expected to do at the Oscars, while Matthew Mcconaughey usurped the Best Supporting Actor award from The Master's Philip Seymour Hoffman. Another shock was Rachel Weisz's win in the Best Actress category, despite pretty much everyone in the industry predicting that Jennifer Lawrence will win the Oscar for Silver Linings Playbook. The biggest surprise of the evening was reserved for the top award - Best Picture - which went to Zero Dark Thirty. Forget Argo and Lincoln, because it was Kathryn Bigelow's drama about the hunt for Osama bin Laden that took the prize. The film currently holds a perfect score of 100% on Rotten Tomatoes, with Screen Crush writing, "This look at world's biggest manhunt may be the best manhunt movie ever made."

The result has affected the bookmakers' interpretation on the race for the Best Picture Oscar, slashing Zero Dark Thirty's odds to 14/1. Ben Affleck's Argo remains the favorite at 2/1. 

Continue reading: The New York Critics Predict The Oscars? Then Kathryn Bigelow Can Start Celebrating

Star Studded Oz: The Great And Powerful New Trailer!


James Franco Mila Kunis Rachel Weisz Michelle Williams Sam Raimi

Judy Garland's 1939 The Wizard of Oz was a Technicolor work of monumental cinematic genius. It somehow captured the spirit and imagination of children and adults alike, providing the right balance of wonder and terror, with a believable and endearing heroine, as well us a truly horrifying villain and her evil flying monkey minions. Oz: The Great and Powerful has just released it's theatrical trailer and in many ways it's a far cry from the original, but equally, the essence seems to remain.

Oz: The Great and Powerful stars James Franco as the eponymous accidental hero, a 'magician' from Kansas who is swept up, in a hot air balloon, in a terrible tornado and transported to the Land of Oz, where he is thought to be their fated hero. Things don't go to plan. The three good witches are played by Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams and Rachel Weisz, and it is only these four main characters that appear as humans, all the rest are animated, in the vibrancy that pays homage to the original's Technicolor. The trailer gives clues and pointers that let the audience know that the movie is going to be touching and terrifying, much like the original. 

The general look of the film, as it appears in the trailer, resembles the OTT Tim Burton version of Alice in Wonderland. However, where Burton massacred the original which didn't really need a remake (and saying massacred really is an exaggeration), Sam Raimi's Oz has the advantage of an entirely different story with almost entirely different characters. Because of this the movie has a real chance of being a gem, and we hope it is. 

Continue reading: Star Studded Oz: The Great And Powerful New Trailer!

Are Fancy Visuals Enough To Save Sam Raimi's Oz: The Great And Powerful?


Sam Raimi James Franco Mila Kunis Michelle Williams Rachel Weisz

A new trailer for Sam Raimi’s Oz: The Great and Powerful has been released online, ahead of its March release date.

This second trailer takes a more in-depth look at the story than the original cinematic trailer unveiled at ComicCon, despite the fact that it begins in almost exactly the same way as the first. The Evil Dead director has been taking his time over this movie. It started production back in July 2011, according to the Indiewire blog and Raimi will be hoping that all of the time and money spent on the movie has paid off. Not only is he toying with cinematic legend, by creating a spin off of The Wizard of Oz, but he’s doing so with some of the hottest names in Hollywood. James Franco stars as Oscar Diggs, whilst the witches are played by Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams and Rachel Weisz.

The response to the new trailer has been mixed so far. Indiewire are full of praise for Raimi’s efforts, going so far as to say that he could even put Tim Burton to shame. They’re impressed by the visuals, though that seems to extend to the ‘visual display’ provided by the three witches, as much as anything else, it has to be said.

Continue reading: Are Fancy Visuals Enough To Save Sam Raimi's Oz: The Great And Powerful?

After Crazy Horse, Could Kelly Brook Be The Next Bond Girl?


Kelly Brook Daniel Craig Sam Mendes Cheryl Cole Rachel Weisz

Kelly Brook is about to make her debut in the burlesque show Crazy Horse, though could more serious roles lie ahead? Probably not, but it's a fun story. According to The Sun newspaper - who ran a recent poll - Brook is the public's preferred choice to become the next Bond girl.

She just pipped singer Cheryl Cole in the poll, which was worryingly short on, err, actresses?  Anyway, Brook has almost no chance of landing a role alongside Daniel Craig in the next month, likely to be directed once again by Sam Mendes. Her acting experience is pretty much limited to Three, Piranha 3D and Keith Lemon: The Movie. As mentioned, Geordie singer Cole came second, while Craig's real-life wife Rachel Weisz was in third place though the entire poll's credibility was lost entirely with news that The Queen scored well, too. 

Earlier this year, Brook suggested she would have flirted with Oscars success had she concentrated on acting at a young age, saying, "I often think if I had been better at focusing on one thing exclusively I'd have had an acting career like Kate Winslet or a career as a top dancer. In many ways I've gone with what people want me to do rather than what I want to do. I am changing that now." Kelly Brook will join the Parisian troupe Crazy Horse for one week from 1 November, 2012.

Continue reading: After Crazy Horse, Could Kelly Brook Be The Next Bond Girl?

Rachel Weisz Monday 30th July 2012 Universal Pictures world premiere of 'The Bourne Legacy' at the Ziegfeld Theatre - Arrivals

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz and Tony Gilroy
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Oz The Great and Powerful Trailer


Oscar Diggs is an ethically-challenged circus magician who seeks fortune and recognition for his tricks and illusions. One day he and his top hat are sent away from his home of Kansas in a hot air balloon but are subsequently caught up in a destructive storm which takes them to the magical land of Oz. Oscar is in awe of the dazzling place and mysterious creatures and begins to see Oz as the path to prosperity. He soon discovers that this is not so when he meets three beautiful witches Theodora, Evanora and Glinda who rightfully doubt his competence in the field of magic despite the rest of Oz believing him to be the powerful wizard they have all been waiting for. His awe of Oz is soon diminished as he discovers troubles of huge proportions in the land and finds himself struggling to work out who is on the side of good and who is on the side of evil. He uses his expertise in the art of illusion and showmanship to become the great and honourable Wizard of Oz.

Continue: Oz The Great and Powerful Trailer

Rachel Weisz and Terence Davies - Rachel Weisz and Terence Davies Thursday 15th March 2012 at New York Premiere of The Deep Blue Sea held at BAM Rose Cinemas Brooklyn New York.

Rachel Weisz and Terence Davies
Rachel Weisz and Terence Davies
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz Wednesday 14th March 2012 arriving at 'The Daily Show' Studio

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

The Deep Blue Sea Review


Excellent
Based on the 1952 Terence Rattigan play, this exquisitely made British drama moves at its own slow pace, pitting repressed emotions against reckless passion. It's also rather gloomy and downbeat, almost reluctant to let us see glimmers of hope in the story.

Hester (Weisz) is tormented by the trajectory of her life: the wife of High Court judge Sir William (Beale), she has fallen for the dashing Battle of Britain pilot Freddie (Hiddleston), who lets their physical relationship dissipate as he struggles to find a role in society after the war. Now isolated and desperate, Hester attempts suicide but only succeeds in making her life worse. Freddie is furious, and William is unnervingly caring. She's caught between the devil and the deep blue sea: is there any way she can have a happy life?

Continue reading: The Deep Blue Sea Review

Rachel Weisz and Jude Law - Rachel Weisz and Jude Law Friday 7th October 2011 in '360'

Tom Hiddleston and Rachel Weisz - Tom Hiddleston and Rachel Weisz Toronto, Canada - 36th Annual Toronto International Film Festival - 'The Deep Blue Sea' premiere arrival at TIFF BELL Lightbox. Sunday 11th September 2011

Tom Hiddleston and Rachel Weisz
Tom Hiddleston
Tom Hiddleston
Tom Hiddleston
Tom Hiddleston and Rachel Weisz
Tom Hiddleston

Dream House Trailer


Will Atenton is a successful publisher living in New York with his wife, Libby and their two children. Wanting a change of pace, he quits his job and moves his family to their dream house in Morgan Creek, a sleepy New England town.

Continue: Dream House Trailer

Rachel Weisz Wednesday 27th July 2011 Screening of 'The Whistleblower' in New York City New York City,USA

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz - Rachel Weisz, New York Cirty, USA - arriving for 'The Late Show with David Letterman' at the Ed Sullivan Theater - Arrivals Wednesday 27th July 2011

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz and Daniel Craig - Rachel Weisz and Daniel Craig New York City, USA - Opening night of the Broadway production of 'Jerusalem' at the Music Box - Arrivals Thursday 21st April 2011

Rachel Weisz and Daniel Craig
Rachel Weisz
Atmosphere and Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz and Daniel Craig
Atmosphere and Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz Monday 13th September 2010 The 35th Toronto International Film Festival - Toronto, Canada

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz - Monday 7th June 2010 at Cfda Fashion Awards New York City, USA

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz Wednesday 26th May 2010 A special screening of 'AGORA' presented by Newmarket Films held at The Museum of Modern Art. New York City, USA

Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz
Rachel Weisz

Agora Trailer


Set in Alexandria in 391 A.D. Agora tells the story of the astronomer-philosopher Hypatia. Knowing her city's in dire turmoil and about to fall to new christian rule, the only safe haven was in the cities legendary library which was housed inside it's own walls.

Continue: Agora Trailer

The Brothers Bloom Review


Good
A perfectly swell caper film that ultimately can't sustain the propelling giddiness of its first hour, The Brothers Bloom burns bright with brilliance before sputtering out in the end. In a case of extreme overreach, writer/director Rian Johnson (Brick) sets out to make a magical-realist brother-buddy screwball romantic comedy heist film, and actually comes close to making it all work. Given the cock-eyed neo-noir linguistic mania of his first film, Johnson seems to be just the right kind of blooming genius to pull off this kind of over-ambitious cinematic caper, but in the end he just sets himself an impossible task.

Johnson's brothers Stephen (Mark Ruffalo) and Bloom (Adrien Brody) appear in the film like some kind of magic vaudeville act gone to seed. A spectacularly goofy opener (including a fake magic cave and a one-legged cat locomoting about on a roller skate) about their childhood paints them as Damon Runyon-style scamps set free in a landscape of innocent marks. It's a cotton-candy world that the boys, with their slouchy hats and black suits, are going to take for everything they can. Their roles are cut and dried: Stephen as the storytelling author of their scams, Bloom as his moody and conflicted accomplice, fated to never live a real life of his own.

Continue reading: The Brothers Bloom Review

Fred Claus Trailer


Fred Claus trailer

Continue: Fred Claus Trailer

The Brothers Bloom Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Brothers Bloom.

Continue: The Brothers Bloom Trailer

My Blueberry Nights Review


Very Good
It's always a tightrope when foreign filmmakers, particularly those from the Hong Kong market, come to American shores to ply their trade. Though it doesn't appear that Wong Kar Wai is going to be setting up shop permanently in Hollywood (nobody's going to be after him to direct the next Die Hard installment), My Blueberry Nights marks his first English-language film, with an entirely American and British cast. It shows that the director is not just a foreign-language specialty, his gifts are quite apparent even when the veil of mystery is lifted for English-speaking audiences once the subtitles are gone. However, My Blueberry Nights also shows that for all Wong's rightly vaunted abilities and passionate sense of cinema, there are some glaringly obvious rough patches in his approach, brought into sharp relief by transplanting the action from the teeming streets of Hong Kong to the wide open spaces of America, where his instincts for actors seem less sure.

An odd road movie of sorts that spends most of its time hanging around in diners, bars, and casinos (and precious little of it on the road), My Blueberry Nights will be noted in many quarters for it being the feature film-acting debut of jazz chanteuse Norah Jones. To put it briefly: No actress is she. Playing a lovelorn young woman named Elizabeth, she first shows up in a Brooklyn diner run by Jeremy, a charming Manchester immigrant played with the expected lighthearted dash by Jude Law. In the middle of a breakup, Elizabeth moons about the café, eating the excellent pie (best in the city!) and chatting with Jeremy, winning his heart even as hers is breaking over somebody else. Then Elizabeth ups and skips out, landing next in Memphis, where she waitresses at a café and a bar, telling everyone she's working two jobs to save up for a car.

Continue reading: My Blueberry Nights Review

Definitely, Maybe Review


Excellent
Poor young Maya (Abigail Breslin) is having a difficult day. Her Manhattan public school just implemented a sexual education program, opening up a world of questions she's not ready to answer. She's still coming to terms with her parents' pending divorce. Convinced she needs to get to the bottom of their crumbling relationship, Maya asks her father, Will (Ryan Reynolds), to tell her the story of how he and her mother met. "It's complicated," he offers, desperately avoiding the difficult task.

He isn't exaggerating. And while Will's story has more levels than a New York skyscraper, the pleasure comes in his recounting as Definitely, Maybe cruises along.

Continue reading: Definitely, Maybe Review

Fred Claus Review


OK

One scene will stay with me for the next six Christmases. Vince Vaughn, playing Santa Claus' dishonest brother Fred, attends a support group for second-banana siblings. Frank Stallone is there, sheepishly admitting that his faith in brother Sylvester faded with each new Rocky movie. Roger Clinton explains how difficult it was being "the First Brother." Fred tries to get a word in edgewise but ends up shouting at Stephen Baldwin (who is great, though we also would have accepted Daniel or Billy in the part).

Fred Claus needed two or three more thinking-outside-the-box scenes like this to help it become more than what it actually is: a fragile premise stuffed with hollow Christmas jokes that would collapse in a holiday heap if not for Vaughn's demonstrated charms.

The disgruntled older brother of jolly old St. Nick (played with warmth and patience by Paul Giamatti) isn't a character so much as the Vaughn persona we've seen in Wedding Crashers, The Break-Up, Old School, and Swingers. Dan Fogelman's script imagines an excuse to get Fred to the North Pole -- he needs $50,000 to open a bar, but Santa refuses the loan unless Fred works a few shifts in the family toy factory. Once in the winter wonderland, Fred avoids his judgmental mother (Kathy Bates), coaches an elf (John Michael Higgins) on how to woo one of Santa's beautiful helpers (Elizabeth Banks), and makes life difficult for an efficiency expert (Kevin Spacey) who is threatening to shut Santa's operation down.

Fred falters because director David Dobkin never definitively chooses between making a kid-friendly money maker or an edgy comedy aimed at our inner teenage boy. The PG rating suggests the former, with tall Vaughn looming over pint-sized co-stars and sleeping in undersized beds (too bad his buddy, Jon Favreau, already milked similar visuals with Will Ferrell in the superior Elf). But the concept of sibling rivalry, the outsourcing of elfin labor, and the need for an intervention will fly over the heads of young ones like Santa's sleigh above snow-covered rooftops on Christmas Eve. Ho, ho, oh well. Maybe next time.







Try a Rolaids.

Sunshine (2000) Review


Excellent
Now that the 20th century is finally over, I guess it's time to start re-interpreting it. Hopefully, summarizers of the century will follow the example of Hungarian director Istvan Svabo and honestly face the truth, no matter how painful. (Unfortunately, many intellectuals don't always seem interested in the truth --- especially about subjects like communism, which many continue to embrace.)

In Sunshine, Svabo looks back through the last 100 years of his country's history for meaning, and finds some --- enough to fill a three-hour, soapy epic about the century's chaos. The film mostly works, and is a worthy addition to Svabo's art.

Continue reading: Sunshine (2000) Review

The Fountain Review


Good
In the press notes for The Fountain, Darren Aronofsky (Pi, Requiem for a Dream) says that he didn't feel that many movies had been made about the quest for immortality. How's that? I can think of a pile off the top of my head: Tuck Everlasting, The Spring, the entire Highlander series... heck, it was the subject of two Star Trek movies (Insurrection and the infamous nadir of the series, The Final Frontier). What Aronofsky should have said is that there are no good movies about immortality, the original Highlander being the notable sole exception. Alas, while it's got ambition to spare, I'm sad to report that The Fountain doesn't much improve the record for "fountain of youth" flicks.

While the rock-'em-sock-'em trailer may have you thinking that The Fountain is cut from Highlander's action-packed, centuries-spanning mold, be advised this is far from the case. In fact, the only real action in the film occurs in the very first scene. The rest of the movie is a meditation on loss, grief, science, and "closure," more of a sci-fi think piece than the grand adventure you might be hoping for.

Continue reading: The Fountain Review

This Is Not An Exit: The Fictional World Of Bret Easton Ellis Review


Bad
"My problem was being a young man with money in Manhattan," says Bret Easton Ellis, citing his inspiration for American Psycho. When it comes to vivid fantasies of alienated urban narcissism, his prose strikes a chilling, edgy chord. Like skimming the surface of an icy lake, we are left imagining the dark depths below.

Hey, that really sounds poetic! I'm gonna have another Valium before writing the rest of this review -- maybe someday I'll be as glib as Ellis!

Continue reading: This Is Not An Exit: The Fictional World Of Bret Easton Ellis Review

Going All The Way Review


Good
Jeremy Davies doesn't really make for a credible ladykiller, nor does he even pass for a G.I. straight outta WWII. Going All the Way's bevy of beauties (dig the cast list) can't make much more out of Mark Pellington's coming of age flick, but an early Ben Affleck proves that, well, Affleck will always be Affleck. Ultimately it's goofy and a little bit confusing, but a few of its insights are worthwhile, if far from unique in this genre.

The Constant Gardener Review


Bad
She's a bleeding heart radical who opposes the Iraq war and feels terrible about poor HIV-inflicted Kenyans. He's a stodgy establishment lackey working for the British High Commission who loves to mind his own business and tend to his gardens. Together, Tessa (Rachel Weisz) and Justin Quayle (Ralph Fiennes) uncover an insidious plot orchestrated by pharmaceutical conglomerates in Fernando Meirelles' The Constant Gardener, a hybrid of '70s-era thrillers like The Parallax View and this year's pro-U.N. fiasco The Interpreter. Adapted from John le Carré's novel, Meirelles' follow-up to his critically overpraised City of God is a concoction of paranoia-drenched conspiracy theories and white liberal guilt over Africa that purports to sympathize with the plight of impoverished Kenyans, but whose real agenda is the vilification of evil Western corporations and the celebration of Africa-loving white martyrs. Infested with mournful close-ups of smiling indigenous kids, Meirelles' film demands that we feel both sorrow over Africa's burgeoning AIDS crisis and fury over the superpowers' sinister refusal to truly help. Primarily, however, his film cares no more about Africa than do the story's evil villains at make-believe drug company FDH.

Collaborating with his City of God cinematographer César Charlone, Meirellas once again fetishistically focuses on destitution and suffering, shooting his squalid Kenyan locations in grimy, slightly overexposed colors and with expressionistic camera angles, turning the beautiful landscape into a harsh pit of fluorescent yellows, rotting greens, stark blacks, and blooming whites. It's a phony-baloney (if striking) visual aesthetic that, when married to the director's rollercoaster-ish hand-held cinematography, provides a sense of both immediacy and self-conscious artistry. Yet no amount of stylistic showing-off can offset the ludicrousness of a love scene between Justin and Tessa - shot in downy hues, it looks like a L'Oreal commercial with excessive zooms - or the preposterousness of Jeffrey Caine's clunky, preachy script, which gussies up its straightforward mystery with numerous flashbacks but fails to confront its central issues of African poverty and corporate malfeasance with anything approaching a rational mind.

Continue reading: The Constant Gardener Review

Runaway Jury Review


Extraordinary
It's a sunny weekday in beautiful New Orleans as a middle-aged, white-collar businessman arrives at his office. He settles into a chair behind his desk and ponders a song in his head. He can't think of the words, so he calls his secretary into the office. He explains to her that he will be celebrating his young daughter's birthday later today, and he promised to sing this song for her. The secretary smiles warmly and helps him remember the lyrics.

Suddenly, horror and chaos erupt as gunfire interrupts their singing. The businessman instructs the secretary to take shelter behind his desk as he locks the office door. After a moment, the gunfire stops, and he cautiously peeks outside the door -- only to be shot point blank in the head by the gunman, who then turns the weapon on himself.

Continue reading: Runaway Jury Review

Sunshine Review


Excellent
Now that the 20th century is finally over, I guess it's time to start re-interpreting it. Hopefully, summarizers of the century will follow the example of Hungarian director Istvan Svabo and honestly face the truth, no matter how painful. (Unfortunately, many intellectuals don't always seem interested in the truth --- especially about subjects like communism, which many continue to embrace.)

In Sunshine, Svabo looks back through the last 100 years of his country's history for meaning, and finds some --- enough to fill a three-hour, soapy epic about the century's chaos. The film mostly works, and is a worthy addition to Svabo's art.

Continue reading: Sunshine Review

The Land Girls Review


Good
Curious period piece, reminiscent of Howards End. This story follows three girls in WWII-era Britain who are drafted to work on a farm while the boys are off to war. Oh, and they're all reallllly horny. Hey, I didn't write it.

Beautiful Creatures Review


Excellent
Not to be confused with Beautiful People or Heavenly Creatures, Beautiful Creatures is a British murder-comedy romp in the tradition of Shallow Grave and Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels.

This time out, its two women (the beautiful Rachel Weisz (The Mummy series) and the less beautiful Susan Lynch) get caught up in a murder when one of their boyfriends gets abusive and takes a lead pipe to the skull at the hands of the other girl. Soon enough, a ransom plan is hatched (despite the fact that the guy is dead), the cops catch on and demand a cut, the body count starts to rise, and the whole affair proves that these girls make poor criminals indeed.

Continue reading: Beautiful Creatures Review

Enemy At The Gates Review


OK
It's Stalingrad, late 1942. A young Russian sharpshooter is picking off Germans at will, bringing a much-needed lift to a demoralized Soviet army. The impatient Nazis send their top sniper to kill the man. A World War diminishes in scope to a battle of two. With such a promising plot, absolutely ripe for gutsy drama and emotion, why does Enemy at the Gates ultimately fail?

First, and foremost, because of its screenplay. Director Jean-Jacques Annaud (Seven Years in Tibet, The Bear) and partner Alain Godard take a horrific true tale and sap it of its energy, irony, and tension. It starts off impressively enough: Russian soliders are immediately gunned down as they arrive in Stalingrad -- if not by the enemy, then by their own officers, who kill the boys when they retreat in terror. Vassily Zaitsev (Jude Law) becomes an instant hero when he plays dead, and in sniper fashion, shoots a number of unsuspecting Nazis.

Continue reading: Enemy At The Gates Review

The Mummy Returns Review


Bad
That darn mummy!

Stab him, burn him, unravel him (or whatever Brendan Fraser & Co. did to him in the original; I can't even remember)... he still keeps coming back!

Continue reading: The Mummy Returns Review

The Mummy Review


Terrible
Normally, when a movie is really bad, the best part of watching the film is watching the previews. When watching The Mummy, Stephen Sommers "not-quite-a-remake-but-really-is" of the 1921 version, I didn't even get that satisfaction. I think one of the previews was good, but not good enough for me to remember its title. I remember that Jan de Bont is coming out with a new chic horror film called The Haunting or something equally cheesy, which looks to be worse than his last one. I also remember seeing a preview for a new Arnold Schwarzenegger movie that didn't even dare put his name on it after him having been in the double-trouble combination of Eraser and Jingle all the Way.

So, when the movie was as bad as the previews, I was not a happy camper.

Continue reading: The Mummy Review

About A Boy Review


Very Good
Prepare to meet the male version of Bridget Jones, as Hugh Grant turns in one of the best performances of his career in a solid -- yet considerably muddy -- romantic comedy.

In About a Boy, Hugh Grant appears to be playing, well, Hugh Grant, a guy with dashing good looks who gets by on his inheritance and his incredible charm. The fact that Will "does nothing" for a living becomes a running joke and even seems to put a damper on his love life, as women are put off by his go-nowhere lifestyle. So rather than get a job, Will decides to join a single parents' support group, inventing a young son and a sob story in the hopes that the vulnerable single moms overlook his character flaws. But the plot backfires when an über-geeky 12-year-old kid named Marcus (Nicholas Hoult, more precocious even than Haley Joel Osment on bath day) takes a liking to Will, showing up on his doorstep every day after school. Alongside their unlikely friendship arise some serious issues -- primarily involving Marcus's suicidal mother (Toni Collette).

Continue reading: About A Boy Review

The Constant Gardener Review


Good
A preachy but gripping socio-political thriller, "TheConstant Gardener" captures the parched beauty of African desert nations,personifies the horrors of their poverty in dusty, sunburned detail, andpulls no punches in its view of greedy drug companies that feign altruismbut view encroaching epidemics as lucrative boons for their stockholders.

Based on the John Le Carre novel of the same name, thefilm's politics are couched in a brutal and twist-filled murder mystery.Ralph Fiennes plays Justin Quayle, a dry, charmingly wonky English diplomatwhose bottled adoration for his eye-catching young wife (Rachel Weisz)-- an impetuous, impassioned human rights activist his colleagues hopehe won't bring to parties -- becomes dangerously uncorked when she is killedand mutilated while on an aid mission.

Realizing there's more to her death than meets the eyewhen his inquiries for more information are deflected by even his closestassociates -- and suspecting she may have been up to something more aswell -- Quayle drops off the diplomatic radar and begins a dangerous amateurinvestigation that puts him in the crosshairs of corrupt politicians, corporatestooges and ruthless warlords.

Directed by Fernando Meirelles with the same unblinking,sweaty, ground-level grittiness he brought to "City of God,"his brilliant verite expose of Brazilian poverty, "The Constant Gardener"becomes an incredible puzzle with far-flung pieces that Quayle must linktogether with tenuous but damning evidence. And whether he travels to Londonor hitches a lift with the Red Cross to a remote village in Kenya devastatedby disease (in order to interrogate a particular doctor), he's under suchconstant threat that in some scenes it feels as if any background actorcould be a hired killer closing in.

Continue reading: The Constant Gardener Review

Constantine Review


Weak

Almost every Catholicism-cloaked supernatural thriller since The Exorcist" has demonstrated an inherent lack of originality, falling back on the same tiresome genre staples: Possessed young women and tied-to-bed exorcisms, "lost" books of the Bible that allow the screenwriter to invent plot-convenient mythology, and a troubled hero trying to prevent some kind of demonic cross-over into our plane of existence.

One of the few exceptions was 1997's "The Devil's Advocate," in which Keanu Reeves gave one of his few truly fine performances as a gifted young defense lawyer whose life is torn apart when he accepts a prestige position in a big-city firm and discovers (too late) its literally Satanic origins. But apparently that was a fluke because Reeves is back to his usual monotoned self in "Constantine," revisiting the same genre as a routine demon-slayer who plays second fiddle to expensive special effects.

A chain-smoking tough-guy super-exorcist who lives in the grittiest part of downtown Los Angeles, John Constantine can see what normal mortals can't -- the angels and "soldier demons" who take human form and battle daily for men's souls. He has personally seen the nuclear-apocalypse-like fires of Hell (when technically dead for two minutes during a teenage suicide attempt) and has spent his life trying to buy his way into Heaven by dispatching devilspawn spirits back from whence they came, often with a golden, cross-shaped shotgun/flamethrower designed by an overzealous props department.

Continue reading: Constantine Review

Beautiful Creatures Review


Weak

While leaving town to get away from her abusive boyfriend, Dorothy (Susan Lynch) comes upon a scene that's all-too-familiar to her: another young woman getting smacked around in the middle of the street.

High on courage and indignation -- at least for the moment -- Dorothy picks up a pipe and bashes the guy's head in, saving platinum blonde trophy squeeze Petula (Rachel Wiesz). But now these newly-bonded sisters have a dead body on their hands.

Such is the set-up for "Beautiful Creatures," an energetic and sometimes clever, dark comedy crime thriller from Scotland that's full of sharp ideas but undermined by blunt-headed characters and logistical loopholes.

Continue reading: Beautiful Creatures Review

Sunshine Review


OK

"Sunshine" is a complex, cross-generational saga about the social, romantic and soul-searching struggles of a proud Jewish family in early 20th Century Hungary. It's a three-hour epic that spans several decades, and while that's a long time to sit still for what is essentially dramatized genealogy, the movie's only unequivocal fault is that it is -- believe it or not -- far too short.

A labor of love from director Istvan Szabo ("Mephisto") -- who co-wrote the film with playwright Israel Horovitz and based it, in part, on episodes in his family history -- this is an intense and personal film with beauty and scope to spare. But with nearly a century of territory to cover and more than a dozen primary characters to enfold, even at 180 minutes, it feels rushed -- like the cinematic equivalent of Cliffs Notes for a great novel.

To give the audience something constant to hang on to throughout the picture, Szabo cast Ralph Fiennes to play three generations of men in the Sonnenschein family, a clan whose fortune comes from an heirloom recipe for tasty, healing herbal tonic known as A Taste of Sunshine -- turned into a popular drink in the late 19th Century by the Sonnenschein patriarch.

Continue reading: Sunshine Review

The Mummy Review


Very Good

Every inch a traditional, joyously corny, pith helmetswashbuckler flick -- complete with damsel in distress -- Universal's post-modernremake of "The Mummy" is a masterful marriage of '30s adventure/horrorand self-cognizant, Millennium-era, thrill-a-minute action.

Packed with awesome CGI special effects and anchored byBrendan Fraser, an ideal dashing-but-scruffy, lantern-jawed hero, thereisn't much left of the 1932 Boris Karloff original here, but as good old-fashionedadventure goes, this "Mummy" is giddy, low-brow fun.

Fraser stars as an soldier of fortune in 1923, leadinga group of treasure hunters and archeologists to a mythological 3,000-year-oldEgyptian city he stumbled on to once before. During their dig, the groupinadvertently awakens an undead and unfriendly mummy -- an ancient priestwho was buried alive in a sarcophagus filled with flesh-eating scarab beetlesmillennia ago for diddling a Pharaoh's mistress, and now he wants her back.

Continue reading: The Mummy Review

The Shape Of Things Review


Weak

It's impossible to discuss some of the hiccups in the concept of Neil LaBute's "The Shape of Things" -- a thorny, thought-provoking contemplation of the lengths people will go for love, or what they think is love -- without giving away the startling twist the film takes in its last act.

But it can be said that in adapting his own 2001 play, the writer-director didn't augment the characters and settings with the additional depth and definition necessary to flesh out a stage production for the screen.

As a film, "The Shape of Things" is set in the real world -- on a college campus where frumpy, unassertive, full-time English major and part-time museum guard Adam (Paul Rudd) comes under the lifestyle-altering influence of a sexy, puckish, wily, funky art student named Evelyn (Rachel Weisz), whose interest and affection Adam desperately clings to because he hardly believes in it himself.

Continue reading: The Shape Of Things Review

About A Boy Review


Good

Having acquired a taste for playing against type from his spot-on performance as an overconfident office scoundrel in "Bridget Jones's Diary," Hugh Grant really sinks his teeth and his spiky new haircut into his starring role as an even more callow cad in "About a Boy."

Londoner Will Freeman is a guy who, when asked to be godfather to a friend's baby daughter, recoils in horror and tries to talk her out of it. "I'll forget all her birthdays," he insists, "until her 18th, when I'll probably take her out to get her drunk, and let's face it, probably try to shag her."

When the same well-meaning friend says she knows he has hidden depths, Will replies, "You've always had that wrong. I really am this shallow."

Continue reading: About A Boy Review

Runaway Jury Review


OK

There are enough holes in the legal minutia of "Runaway Jury" to keep anyone with a law degree laughing from beginning to end. But for the rest of us, this fast-paced thriller's twist-crescendo-ing plot and sharp performances should at least delay the feeling of being duped until after the credits roll.

Another popcorny courtroom concoction from a John Grisham novel, the movie is a sensationalized peek into jury tampering during a big-money wrongful-death suit filed against an assault-weapon manufacturer after a workplace shooting.

The film wears its politics on its sleeve: the rich, cigar-smoking, unrepentant gun industry honchos have hired an unscrupulous jury consultant (deliciously iniquitous Gene Hackman) with the high-tech means to dig up dirt and create graphic-intensive computer-screen portfolios on everybody who received a jury summons for the case.

Continue reading: Runaway Jury Review

Enemy At The Gates Review


OK

The first half-hour of "Enemy at the Gates" is a cinematically stunning, hyper-realistic battlefield nightmare that transports the viewer right into the heart of the Nazis' yearlong siege of Stalingrad during World War II.

"Autumn, 1942," deplores the period-style voiceover as a shadow creeps across an illustrative map in an updated homage to old-timey war pictures. "Europe lies crushed under the Nazi jackboot..."

German planes dive-bomb troop transports in an incredible attack sequence. Sweeping shots the color of mud and blood take in the scale of the besieged city's cold, yet smoldering ruins while Red Army officers recite threatening propaganda to masses of soldiers who would rather flee.

Continue reading: Enemy At The Gates Review

Rachel Weisz

Rachel Weisz Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Comments Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Rachel Weisz

Date of birth

7th March, 1970

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.7


Advertisement
Advertisement

Rachel Weisz Movies

The Mercy Trailer

The Mercy Trailer

Donald Crowhurst is an amateur sailor whose ambition eclipses his financial woes. When he comes...

My Cousin Rachel Movie Review

My Cousin Rachel Movie Review

Daphne du Maurier's 1951 mystery-romance novel has been adapted for theatre, radio, TV and film,...

My Cousin Rachel Trailer

My Cousin Rachel Trailer

Philip is a typical young English gent, except that he has a deepening desire for...

The Light Between Oceans Movie Review

The Light Between Oceans Movie Review

With a sweeping, picturesque setting and emotive performances, this dramatic epic will appeal to moviegoers...

Denial Trailer

Denial Trailer

Professor Deborah Lipstadt spent her life documenting and writing about the atrocities that happened in...

Light Between Oceans Trailer

Light Between Oceans Trailer

The Light Between Oceans comes as a new drama film and sees the themes of...

Advertisement
The Lobster Movie Review

The Lobster Movie Review

Throwing a solid Hollywood cast into a surreal arthouse satire, acclaimed Greek filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos...

The Lobster Trailer

The Lobster Trailer

David is a single man having just left a 12 year relationship. As per the...

Youth Trailer

Youth Trailer

Mick and Fred have been friends lifelong friends, now both reaching their more senior years...

Oz the Great and Powerful Movie Review

Oz the Great and Powerful Movie Review

Like Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland, this film shows the overpowering strength of Disney and...

Oz: The Great And Powerful Trailer

Oz: The Great And Powerful Trailer

Oscar Diggs is a magician in a circus in Kansas who has about as much...

The Bourne Legacy Movie Review

The Bourne Legacy Movie Review

Writer Gilroy adds directing to his Bourne chores, shifting the franchise into a cerebral thriller...

360 Movie Review

360 Movie Review

Loosely based on Arthur Schnitzler's play La Ronde, this beautifully assembled film is easy to...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.