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Sony Remaking 1996 Cult Horror Movie 'The Craft'


The Craft Robin Tunney Fairuza Balk Neve Campbell Rachel True

The cult horror film, The Craft, is being remade by Sony. The reboot of the 1996 film, which was also distributed by Sony (under their Columbia banner), will have a brand new director but a few executives are reprising their roles for the upcoming project.

Neve CampbellNeve Campbell starred in the original movie.

Read More:  Neve Campbell Explains Why She Did Four Scream Movies.

Continue reading: Sony Remaking 1996 Cult Horror Movie 'The Craft'

Video - Neve Campbell and Rachel True Deep In Conversation


Canadian actress Neve Campbell (Party of Five; Scream; Wild Things) and American actress Rachel True (Half & Half; The Cosby Show; The Craft) are seen together in Beverly Hills. The pair seem to be deep in conversation as they pass the photographers and only acknowledge them when they stop to cross the road.

Neve and Rachel met each other on the set of teen horror film 'The Craft' - a film about four teenage girls who practise witchcraft - and have been best friends ever since

Picture - Neve Campbell and Rachel True Los Angeles, California, Friday 21st October 2011

Neve Campbell and Rachel True - Neve Campbell and Rachel True Los Angeles, California - leaving M Cafe in Beverly Hills Friday 21st October 2011

Neve Campbell and Rachel True
Neve Campbell and Rachel True
Neve Campbell and Rachel True
Neve Campbell and Rachel True
Neve Campbell and Rachel True

Picture - Rachel True (c) and guests Los Angeles, California, Thursday 21st July 2011

Rachel True - Rachel True (c) and guests Los Angeles, California - Lyric Culture presents 'Electro Sexual' collection with INXS at the Gibson showroom Thursday 21st July 2011

Picture - Rachel True Los Angeles, California, Saturday 18th April 2009

Rachel True Saturday 18th April 2009 The 20th Annual GLAAD Media Awards held at the Nokia Theater - Inside Los Angeles, California

Embrace Of The Vampire Review


Grim
You have to wonder what Alyssa Milano was thinking when she opted to take the lead role in the cheapie, borderline-sexploitation flick Embrace of the Vampire. Who's the Boss? had wrapped in 1992, and a few TV movies (including a turn as Amy Fisher in '93) didn't kick-start her film career at all. Embrace took her into the realm of B-movies and hard. She's topless for about half the film, though her character is supposed to be a virgin being seduced by a vampire for unknown ends on the eve of her 18th birthday. (Mind you, Milano already had a tattoo above her crotch, kind of ruining the "innocent" effect.) It's a miracle she came out of the funk, landing a cushy role in Charmed and a spokesperson job for 1-800-COLLECT. Way to go, Alyssa.

Continue reading: Embrace Of The Vampire Review

The Craft Review


Grim
A coven of outcast, teenage witches wreaks havoc at a high school.

Rarely have I been able to totally boil down the plot of a film so succinctly, but with The Craft, it's a piece of cake. What, no intricate subplots, you ask? No involved character development? No story progression from one act to the next?

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Half Baked Review


Good
Really, how can you hate a movie with a flying dog?

The answer you can't. You also can't hate a movie that's as funny and blissfully stupid as Half Baked, the 1998 pot comedy written by Dave Chappelle and Neal Brennan (the two guys behind Chappelle's Show) and directed by Tamra Davis.

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Groove Review


OK
According to Groove, the economics of throwing a rave: Charge $2 a head for some 200 people to inhabit an abandoned warehouse for one night. Provide free food, water, massages, and of course, music from a parade of 5 or 6 DJs. Sounds like a losing proposition to me.

In fact, the last time I went to a rave (in 1991, when the scene was already on its way out), it cost $8. Today, it's like $20. Groove's $2 rave sounds a little phony, a little dated.

Continue reading: Groove Review

New Best Friend Review


Unbearable
If the people behind the Girls Gone Wild videos were ever to develop a movie, New Best Friend would be it. Beautiful women grind on each other, share long, lingering kisses and (un)dress like they're preparing for a Maxim cover shoot.

Not a single shred of thought was invested in making this movie. There's not one sympathetic character or interesting thought to be found. If half the budget were actually spent on belly shirts and hair gel, I wouldn't be shocked.

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New Best Friend Review


Terrible

A boring, unfocused twist on the dangerous-in-crowd B-movie archetype, "New Best Friend" stars innocent yet mysterious Mia Kirshner ("Exotica," "Not Another Teen Movie") as an insecure outcast at a tony North Carolina college who falls into a drug-induced coma a few weeks after falling in with the campus snob squad of well-heeled sexpots.

It seems party girls Meredith Monroe ("Dawson's Creek"), Dominique Swain ("Lolita") and Rachel True ("The Craft") took dowdy, pouty Kirshner under their collective wing and gave her a makeover that changed her life. Freed from her frumpy sweaters and bed-head hair, the girl suddenly lost interest in schoolwork and her one-scene nobody of a best friend. Now she's all about lip gloss, snug little spaghetti-strapped tank tops (braless, naturally) and inexplicably confident flirtations with the Big Man On Campus (Scott Bairstow), who didn't even know she was alive a few scenes earlier when he walked by in studly, teen-movie slow motion.

Now that she's laid up in a hospital bed, her barfly mother is screaming how the popularity triad must have done something to her, and the small town's temporary sheriff (the talented but badly miscast Taye Diggs) is conducting an investigation that the school's snooty dean wants kept quiet.

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Groove Review


Weak

Made for love, not money, by an upstart filmmaker who knows and adores his subject, "Groove" is an enthusiastic, insider snapshot of the sweaty, adrenaline-driven, hyper-party atmosphere of San Francisco's red-hot rave scene.

Capturing the boundlessly euphoric spirit of this kinetic musical subculture, this Sundance buzz bin picture is a biography of one rave -- from the guerilla location scouting in empty warehouses to the mood of Ecstasy-fueled pulse electronica that becomes more and more exhilarating with each changing of the guard on the DJs' turn tables.

Writer-director-editor Greg Harrison has a little trouble maintaining the needed verve because he invites the audience into the rave experience through a handful of rather uninvolving characters with elementary story arcs. David (Hamish Linklater) is a high-strung rave virgin, dragged to the party by his live-for-pleasure brother, Colin (Denny Kirkwood). Harmony (Mackenzie Firgens) is Colin's girlfriend, to whom he proposes before making a huge romantic mistake under the influence of Ecstasy. Layla (charismatic Lola Glaudini, "NYPD Blue") is a aimless-but-intelligent beauty who inexplicably nurses David the wet blanket through his paranoid and blissful first time dropping E. They're a shallow and sometimes grave bunch, and far less fun-loving than your average raver.

Continue reading: Groove Review

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