Rachel Roberts

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Andrew Niccol and Rachel Roberts - The premiere of 'The Host' held at the Arclight theatre - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 19th March 2013

Andrew Niccol and Rachel Roberts
Andrew Niccol

Andrew Niccol and Rachel Roberts - Andrew Niccol and Rachel Roberts London, England - 'In Time' UK film premiere held at the Curzon Mayfair - Arrivals Monday 31st October 2011

Andrew Niccol and Rachel Roberts
Andrew Niccol and Rachel Roberts
Andrew Niccol and Rachel Roberts
Andrew Niccol
Andrew Niccol and Rachel Roberts
Andrew Niccol

In Time Trailer


In the near future, the world's population lives until the age of 25. After that, if you want to live longer, you must work hard to earn more time or, alternatively, you can inherit or illegally steal it. The rich have almost unlimited access to all the time in the world, thereby making them immortal. The poor die young. Any time you have remaining shows on your arm as a constant reminder.

Continue: In Time Trailer

Rachel Roberts Thursday 20th October 2011 The Premiere of 'In Time' held at Regency Village Theatre - outside Westwood, California

Rachel Roberts
Rachel Roberts
Rachel Roberts

Rachel Roberts and Andrew Niccol - Rachel Roberts, Andrew Niccol Wstwood, California - The Premiere of 'In Time' held at Regency Village Theatre - Arrivals Thursday 20th October 2011

Rachel Roberts and Andrew Niccol
Rachel Roberts
Rachel Roberts and Andrew Niccol
Rachel Roberts
Rachel Roberts
Rachel Roberts

Rachel Roberts and Prince Monday 17th May 2010 Los Angeles premiere of 'Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time' at Grauman's Chinese Theater Hollywood, California

Rachel Roberts and Prince

O Lucky Man! Review


Excellent
Countless "human pinball" movies (think After Hours) owe a deep debt to O Lucky Man! Complex, fascinating, and even a bit confusing, the film is a sprawling, three-hour adventure that will quite literally have you guessing until the very end.

After an opening vignette that tells us exactly what it means to be "unlucky," we meet our "lucky" hero: Michael Travis (Malcolm McDowell) a sales trainee for a British coffee company. His first day on the job, that inimitable McDowell smile lands him an instant position in the field as a traveling sales rep serving the northeast part of England. Soon he's making sales calls and finds himself sucked into an upscale swinger's club, complete with live sex shows. Life's looking up... at least until a lost Travis stumbles upon a secret military base and is tortured as a spy... only to be saved at the last second when something unseen goes awry, causing the base to evacuate.

Continue reading: O Lucky Man! Review

Saturday Night And Sunday Morning Review


Very Good
Serious film buffs are familiar with Britain's so-called "kitchen-sink" dramas, unpleasant little slices of lower-class life shot quickly and on small budgets in the 1950s and '60s. Often starring young actors who would go on to greatness, they're fascinating glimpses into the sooty and generally unpleasant world of post-War England, although it's hard to imagine why working-class moviegoers of the time would have enjoyed seeing their humdrum lives replicated on screen.

Case in point is Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, in which a young and virile Albert Finney stars as Arthur Seaton, a thoroughly disillusioned cynic who toils over a metal lathe in an infernal factory and waits for the weekend, when he heads out for two solid days of drinking and womanizing, hoping Monday never comes.

Continue reading: Saturday Night And Sunday Morning Review

Murder On The Orient Express Review


Excellent
Classic Agatha Christie becomes a near-classic motion picture, as a dozen major stars are trapped on a snowbound train with what appears to be a killer on the loose. It's up to an absurdly made-up Poirot (Albert Finney) to unmask the murderer of a millionaire in this rich whodunit. Beautifully made and full of good one-liners, Ingred Bergman inexplicably won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar as a relatively forgettable "simple woman." Odd.

Simone Review


Good
It might sound contrived to say that a film about a computer-generated movie star is a little flat but... well, there it is. It's the unfortunate truth about writer/director Andrew Niccol's Simone, an Al Pacino-led comedy where Niccol visits some of the same intriguing notions of fame, success, and public perception as in his screenplay for The Truman Show. In that film, the center of attention was a man watched by an adoring and all-knowing viewing audience -- in Simone, the public still loves a superstar... they just have no clue that she's a complete fake.

And not "fake," like some butt-kissing movie actress, but really fake. Simone (or S1m0ne, as Niccol sharply titles the film) is the perfect pixilated creation of a Microsoft-age mad scientist, who's created his flawless CGI actress specifically for floundering moviemaker Viktor Taransky (a truly entertaining Al Pacino). Viktor needs a hit badly and the lead actress on his new feature -- played by Winona Ryder, in a painfully ironic appearance -- has just stormed off his new movie due to "creative differences." Nine months later (human gestation period, if I'm not mistaken) Simone is born to take her place. And since our obsessive inventor has quickly died from an eye tumor, contracted from too much computer use(!), only Viktor knows the true secret of his new lead actress.

Continue reading: Simone Review

Foul Play Review


Very Good
I've seen Foul Play more times than I'm willing to admit, but watching it again on DVD reveals just how brainless and silly the film really is. Not that that's a bad thing: With Goldie Hawn and Chevy Chase in the leads, what more would you expect? But the movie, at last, is showing its age after all these years.

Hawn plays a San Francisco librarian who unwittingly gets wrapped up in a massive conspiracy revolving around the Catholic church and a host of bad guys, including an albino and a dwarf (possibly teaming up these two iconic movie evildoers for the first time in cinema). Chase, after appearing in one early scene, vanishes for the first 45 minutes, returning to reveal himself as a bumbling cop who protects her for the remainder of the film. Together they crack the case, one of the most absurd stories ever put on film.

Continue reading: Foul Play Review

Picnic At Hanging Rock Review


Very Good
Long before The Truman Show, Peter Weir put together this sleek yet frustrating story of four prep-school girls who vanish without a trace from an Australian geological site, Hanging Rock. Set in 1900, it's a corseted tale of weird spiritualism and repressed emotions common in the era -- all scored by Zamfir and his pan flute(!) Based on a novel, not a true story, it still recalls later films like Heavenly Creatures, which actually pulled off this kind of moody, brooding tale of wierd teenage girls with more aplomb.
Rachel Roberts

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Rachel Roberts Movies

In Time Trailer

In Time Trailer

In the near future, the world's population lives until the age of 25. After that,...

Saturday Night and Sunday Morning Movie Review

Saturday Night and Sunday Morning Movie Review

Serious film buffs are familiar with Britain's so-called "kitchen-sink" dramas, unpleasant little slices of lower-class...

Simone Movie Review

Simone Movie Review

It might sound contrived to say that a film about a computer-generated movie star is...

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