Rachel Griffiths

Rachel Griffiths

Rachel Griffiths Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

2016 AACTA International Awards

Rachel Griffiths - AACTA International Awards at Avalon Hollywood - Arrivals at Avalon Hollywood - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 29th January 2016

Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths

2016 G'Day Los Angeles Gala

Rachel Griffiths , Banjo Patrick Taylor - 2016 G'Day Los Angeles Gala at Vibiana - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 28th January 2016

Rachel Griffiths and Banjo Patrick Taylor
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths

2015 G'DAY USA Gala Featuring The AACTA International Awards

Rachel Griffiths - 2015 G'DAY USA Gala featuring the AACTA International Awards presented by Qantas at Hollywood Palladium - Arrivals at Hollywood Palladium - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 31st January 2015

Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths

Rachel Griffiths Filming Scenes For Her New Movie 'Mammal'

Rachel O'Byrne and Barry Keoghan - Rachel Griffiths filming scenes for her new movie 'Mammal' - Dublin, Ireland - Wednesday 15th October 2014

Rachel Griffiths, Rachel O'byrne, Barry Keoghan and Mammal
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths

'Gold' Special Screening

Andrew Taylor and Rachel Griffiths - 'Gold' special screening - Dublin, Ireland - Friday 10th October 2014

Andrew Taylor and Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths

Saving Mr. Banks Review


Excellent

This true story only barely avoids becoming sloppily sentimental, thanks to a solid cast and a final act that generates honest emotion. Awash with the Disney spirit, the film breaks free of the marketing machine to recount events that are lively and often very funny, but also manage to be sharply moving. It's the kind of crowd-pleaser that deserves to do well both at the box office and in awards ceremonies.

Set in 1961, it's the story of how Walt Disney (Hanks) finally lures PL Travers (Thompson) to Hollywood to woo her into signing over the film rights to Mary Poppins after some 20 years of pestering. She is equally determined to protect her creation, which is very close to her heart. But she agrees to work with the screenwriter (Whitford) and composers (Schwartzman and Novak) as long as she has veto power. Her demands are crazy ("I don't want the colour red anywhere in the movie!"), but everyone tries to win her over. Eventually Walt realises that he needs to find out exactly why Mary Poppins is so important to her. And that the story is more about Mary's affect on the family's father, Mr Banks, than the children.

Indeed, in parallel flashbacks we see Travers' childhood in rural 1906 Australia, where she lives as a young girl (Buckley) with her lively father (Farrell) and shattered mother (Wilson). Her dad's alcoholism is the driving force of these scenes, which feel like a completely separate film intercut with sunny 1960s Hollywood. But they add weight to Thompson's remarkably detailed performance, which is marvellously withering and hilarious, and also subtly emotional. Her interaction with the buoyant Hanks is sharp and jagged, and the film's nicest scenes are between Travers and her driver, sensitively played by Giamatti.

Continue reading: Saving Mr. Banks Review

Saving Mr. Banks Trailer


P.L. Travers was an Australian author who, in the early sixties, went into negotiations with Walt Disney over the rights of her novels surrounding the character Mary Poppins. It was eventually released on the big screen and won five Oscars, though its production was not without its conflicts. Travers' initial aversion to Hollywood didn't help matters, and she was unnerved by the idea that Disney might turn her beloved character into a prancing, dancing, twinkling fairy godmother. However, when Disney began to understand that Mary Poppins' place in the story was less about the children and more about their father - and, in effect, her own father on whom she based him on - the pair began to bond better and Travers was finally willing to unleash her story onto the world.

'Saving Mr. Banks' is the story of how 'Mary Poppins' was put to film in 1964 by Walt Disney, thirty years after P.L. Travers began writing about her. It is about the conflicts between Travers and Disney and Travers own struggles with her personal life when we discover just how true to life the story really was. It has been directed by John Lee Hancock ('Snow White and the Huntsman', 'A Perfect World', 'The Blind Side') and written by Kelly Marcel ('Terra Nova') and Sue Smith ('My Brother Jack', 'Peaches') and it is set to hit UK cinemas on January 17th 2014.

Click Here To Read - Saving Mr. Banks - Movie Review 

Beautiful Kate Review


Good
As an Australian Outback family takes a trip down memory lane, this film is anything but sentimental. It's a darkly twisted drama about the tough road to redemption and forgiveness.


After staying away for 20 years, Ned (Mendelsohn) drives his young financee (Dermody) into the middle of nowhere to meet his family. She's clearly out of place in such a rural environment, and being reunited with his younger sister (Griffiths) and wheezy dad (Brown) isn't exactly comfortable for Ned, as skeletons come tumbling from the closet. As a boy (Gill then O'Donnell in flashback), he was unnaturally close to his twin sister Kate (Burner then Lowe), whose early death is also entangled with the death of his older brother (Binks then McFarlane).


Yes, this is a fairly heavy and bleak story, but actress-turned-filmmaker Ward gives it a raw beauty that keeps us gripped, darting back and forth in time to fill in key details as Ned dredges ever deeper into his memory. Ward shoots and edits the flashback scenes with particular skill, really getting into the mind of this confused boy as his closeness to Kate takes an inappropriate turn. And the moods and attitudes are razor sharp.


Meanwhile, the cast members create vivid characters that are utterly consistent even with two or three actors in various eras of each role. All of them have a haunted quality that draws us in, although as the story gets increasingly intense our ability to identify with the characters diminishes. As Kate, Lowe haunts the film beautifully, rather like she haunts everyone's memories.

Continue reading: Beautiful Kate Review

Angel Rodriguez Review


Good
Angel Rodriguez is a small-scale and elegantly understated look at one troubled urban teen's dilemmas and the equally tough challenges faced by the woman charged to help him. Spanning just two typical days in the life of 16-year-old Angel (Jonan Everett), we're given just enough time to appreciate how tough it will be for him to change his circumstances. There are no easy answers.

We meet Angel in the apartment of Nicole (Rachel Griffiths) and her husband Henry (Denis O'Hare). It isn't quite clear what the relationship between Angel and the couple is, but we know he's been invited to sleep over. Only later do we realize that Nicole is Angel's generous social worker, and he has nowhere else to go. Henry is not pleased by the arrangement but tries to engage Angel, with little success. They're from different planets.

Continue reading: Angel Rodriguez Review

Step Up Review


Weak
Advertising materials tell us all we need to know about Step Up. She's a little bit Fame, and he's a little bit West Side Story. She's an ice queen, while he's a Vanilla Ice clone. We get it. Yet choreographer-turned-director Anne Fletcher does everything short of laying down railroad track and positioning her leads on opposite sides to hammer home the from-different-worlds hook that carries her fleet-footed tween fairy tale.Channing Tatum fills the baggy jeans of street-tough foster kid Tyler - all the truly edgy names must have been taken. Using a baseball cap and blank stare as method tools, the actor aims for the fiery rebellion of James Dean or early Richard Gere but achieves a flatness reserved for James Franco.This watered-down Eminem walks his own 8 Mile until the cops bust him for vandalizing property at the Maryland School of the Arts. Tasked with serving 200 hours of community service, Tyler mouths off to authority (Rachel Griffiths, longing for her Six Feet Under days), romances self-centered dancer Nora (Jenna Dewan), and discovers a career path that might one day lead him out of the ghetto.Fletcher's resume is littered with professional choreography jobs on films like Bring it On and Ice Princess. She pours her creative juice into this film's numerous dance routines, and it's during those moments that Step Up shows flashes of potential. Tatum and Dewan have limited ability as dramatic actors, but each can move to the beat with the best of them.Fletcher desperately needs someone in her cast to - pardon the pun - step up and elevate the film past the stacks of storytelling clichés cranked out by screenwriters Duane Adler and Melissa Rosenberg. Their script half tries, with unfinished results. Days after Tyler arrives on campus, Nora's dance partner conveniently drops out of her senior routine with a temporary injury. Nora's mother frowns on her unyielding dedication to dance, yet pays for her daughter to attend a private arts program. When Step Up reaches beyond the dance floor, exploring a gang grudge that leads to the death of someone close to Tyler, the movie fatally stumbles and never regains its footing.Step up? How 'bout you step off!?

Step Up Review


Weak
Advertising materials tell us all we need to know about Step Up. She's a little bit Fame, and he's a little bit West Side Story. She's an ice queen, while he's a Vanilla Ice clone. We get it. Yet choreographer-turned-director Anne Fletcher does everything short of laying down railroad track and positioning her leads on opposite sides to hammer home the from-different-worlds hook that carries her fleet-footed tween fairy tale.Channing Tatum fills the baggy jeans of street-tough foster kid Tyler - all the truly edgy names must have been taken. Using a baseball cap and blank stare as method tools, the actor aims for the fiery rebellion of James Dean or early Richard Gere but achieves a flatness reserved for James Franco.This watered-down Eminem walks his own 8 Mile until the cops bust him for vandalizing property at the Maryland School of the Arts. Tasked with serving 200 hours of community service, Tyler mouths off to authority (Rachel Griffiths, longing for her Six Feet Under days), romances self-centered dancer Nora (Jenna Dewan), and discovers a career path that might one day lead him out of the ghetto.Fletcher's resume is littered with professional choreography jobs on films like Bring it On and Ice Princess. She pours her creative juice into this film's numerous dance routines, and it's during those moments that Step Up shows flashes of potential. Tatum and Dewan have limited ability as dramatic actors, but each can move to the beat with the best of them.Fletcher desperately needs someone in her cast to - pardon the pun - step up and elevate the film past the stacks of storytelling clichés cranked out by screenwriters Duane Adler and Melissa Rosenberg. Their script half tries, with unfinished results. Days after Tyler arrives on campus, Nora's dance partner conveniently drops out of her senior routine with a temporary injury. Nora's mother frowns on her unyielding dedication to dance, yet pays for her daughter to attend a private arts program. When Step Up reaches beyond the dance floor, exploring a gang grudge that leads to the death of someone close to Tyler, the movie fatally stumbles and never regains its footing.Step up? How 'bout you step off!?

The Hard Word Review


Good
At first I thought it was an Aussie take on a heist film, with a clever angle on where one might find three cool specialists in armed robbery. Intriguing as that setup was, during the second act, the style had changed to a Philip Marlowe noirish crime piece. By the last act, I realized it was both of those, but with a campy unseriousness about it, sometimes reducing itself to a Keystone Kops comedy of errors.

Our three heroes are brother convicts sprung from prison because of their ability to pull off their capers with dispatch and safety. As the one who comes up with the clever strategies, ringleader Dale Twentyman (Guy Pearce) has certain standards, and one of them is his insistence that "no one gets hurt." His bothers Mal (Damien Richardson), a sweet and perhaps a bit retarded master chef (as far as the prison population is concerned), and Shane (Joel Edgerton), the sometimes raging, creepy, close-to-the-edge schizophrenic who likes to be called "Muscles," are perfectly willing to go along with Dale's insistence on carrying unloaded guns so long as he comes up with plans that work.

Continue reading: The Hard Word Review

Children Of The Revolution Review


OK
A true oddity, in keeping with Australian cinema. What with F. Murray Abraham as Stalin (yes, the Stalin), who fathers a lovechild in the 1950s with a visiting Australian radical played by Judy Davis, how can you expect anything but weirdness? With early-career appearances by Rachel Griffiths and Geoffrey Rush, Children of the Revolution is remarkable for its sheer ballsiness, but the story is likely a bit too circuitous, self-referential, and unbelievable for most tastes. Ostensibly based on a true story, the sarcasm eventually gets so thick you find you need a mint.

Muriel's Wedding Review


OK
What is it with Australians and ABBA? First Priscilla, Queen of the Desert took ABBA worship to a new level. Now, Muriel's Wedding seeks to break that boundary with a nearly non-stop ABBA soundtrack. After nearly two hours of exposure, I'm realizing that they weren't too bad of a band.

Muriel's Wedding uses the songs of the Swedish supergroup as a clever link to the thoughts and feelings of Muriel, a young Australian woman obsessed with becoming married as soon as possible. Muriel (Toni Collette) lives with her go-nowhere family in the town of Porpoise Spit, where she spends most of her time in her room, listening to ABBA when her father isn't giving her grief.

Continue reading: Muriel's Wedding Review

The Rookie Review


OK
The Rookie, as you may have figured out from its television advertising blitz, is the true story of Jimmy Morris, a 35-year-old high school science teacher and baseball coach that takes one last shot at his dream of playing in the Major Leagues. It's definitely an inspiring story, but unfortunately the filmmakers never manage to build a strong momentum as the story wends through Morris's life.

The primary shortcoming of the film is that it takes three or four separate stories and loosely strings them together, while leaving out perhaps the most interesting story of all. Granted, the centerpiece of the film is how a high school science teacher makes his way to the major leagues, but this story seems rushed and almost an afterthought by the time we get to it. Instead, the filmmakers take up too much time early on relaying a tenuously related fable about nuns and the origins of baseball in Jim's rural Texas town, and then mill around in Morris's childhood, focusing on his strained relationship with the stern father that did not support his dream.

Continue reading: The Rookie Review

Rachel Griffiths

Rachel Griffiths Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.