Rachel Griffiths

Rachel Griffiths

Rachel Griffiths Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

Hacksaw Ridge - Trailer and Clips


In 1919 Desmond Doss was born, he lived a quiet life and always wanted to become a doctor and also had ambitions to marry his sweetheart, Dorothy. As the World War II continued to spread terror around the world, Doss knew he must play his part and serve his country with his fellow man. For religious and ethical reasons, Doss had always been a pacifist and never believed in hurting another man and joined the forces as a medic in the hopes of saving the lives of injured soldiers.

When he arrived for training, resources were so tight that all medics were made to train in armed combat, there was no other option but to pick up a weapon and begin training like everyone else on the base. Unable to falter from his convictions, Doss's superiors were soon involved in the situation and Doss fought for his beliefs and was officially named a conscientious objector;  that also made him a target for the other recruits who came to nickname him a coward.

As their initial battle day approached, the men didn't look toward Doss as one of their own, more as just another potential body going into a losing battle. The whole regiment found themselves being bombarded by powerful blasts from bombs and guns and somehow Doss survived, but not only did he survive, he went on to pull a number of men away from the front line and save them from certain death.

Continue: Hacksaw Ridge - Trailer and Clips

Banjo Taylor , Rachel Griffiths - AACTA International Awards at Avalon Hollywood - Arrivals at Avalon Hollywood - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 29th January 2016

Banjo Taylor and Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths

Rachel Griffiths , Banjo Patrick Taylor - 2016 G'Day Los Angeles Gala at Vibiana - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 28th January 2016

Rachel Griffiths and Banjo Patrick Taylor
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths

Rachel Griffiths - 2015 G'DAY USA Gala featuring the AACTA International Awards presented by Qantas at Hollywood Palladium - Arrivals at Hollywood Palladium - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 31st January 2015

Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths

Saving Mr. Banks Review


Excellent

This true story only barely avoids becoming sloppily sentimental, thanks to a solid cast and a final act that generates honest emotion. Awash with the Disney spirit, the film breaks free of the marketing machine to recount events that are lively and often very funny, but also manage to be sharply moving. It's the kind of crowd-pleaser that deserves to do well both at the box office and in awards ceremonies.

Set in 1961, it's the story of how Walt Disney (Hanks) finally lures PL Travers (Thompson) to Hollywood to woo her into signing over the film rights to Mary Poppins after some 20 years of pestering. She is equally determined to protect her creation, which is very close to her heart. But she agrees to work with the screenwriter (Whitford) and composers (Schwartzman and Novak) as long as she has veto power. Her demands are crazy ("I don't want the colour red anywhere in the movie!"), but everyone tries to win her over. Eventually Walt realises that he needs to find out exactly why Mary Poppins is so important to her. And that the story is more about Mary's affect on the family's father, Mr Banks, than the children.

Indeed, in parallel flashbacks we see Travers' childhood in rural 1906 Australia, where she lives as a young girl (Buckley) with her lively father (Farrell) and shattered mother (Wilson). Her dad's alcoholism is the driving force of these scenes, which feel like a completely separate film intercut with sunny 1960s Hollywood. But they add weight to Thompson's remarkably detailed performance, which is marvellously withering and hilarious, and also subtly emotional. Her interaction with the buoyant Hanks is sharp and jagged, and the film's nicest scenes are between Travers and her driver, sensitively played by Giamatti.

Continue reading: Saving Mr. Banks Review

Saving Mr. Banks Trailer


P.L. Travers was an Australian author who, in the early sixties, went into negotiations with Walt Disney over the rights of her novels surrounding the character Mary Poppins. It was eventually released on the big screen and won five Oscars, though its production was not without its conflicts. Travers' initial aversion to Hollywood didn't help matters, and she was unnerved by the idea that Disney might turn her beloved character into a prancing, dancing, twinkling fairy godmother. However, when Disney began to understand that Mary Poppins' place in the story was less about the children and more about their father - and, in effect, her own father on whom she based him on - the pair began to bond better and Travers was finally willing to unleash her story onto the world.

'Saving Mr. Banks' is the story of how 'Mary Poppins' was put to film in 1964 by Walt Disney, thirty years after P.L. Travers began writing about her. It is about the conflicts between Travers and Disney and Travers own struggles with her personal life when we discover just how true to life the story really was. It has been directed by John Lee Hancock ('Snow White and the Huntsman', 'A Perfect World', 'The Blind Side') and written by Kelly Marcel ('Terra Nova') and Sue Smith ('My Brother Jack', 'Peaches') and it is set to hit UK cinemas on January 17th 2014.

Click Here To Read - Saving Mr. Banks - Movie Review 

Rachel Griffiths Thursday 22nd July 2010 arrives at the Neil Lane Bridal Collection Debut at Drai's Los Angeles, California

Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths and Neil Lane
Rachel Griffiths
Rachel Griffiths

Rachel Griffiths and Vanity Fair Sunday 22nd February 2009 The 81st Annual Academy Awards (Oscars) - Vanity Fair Party Hollywood, California

Rachel Griffiths and Vanity Fair

Angel Rodriguez Review


Very Good
Angel Rodriguez is a small-scale and elegantly understated look at one troubled urban teen's dilemmas and the equally tough challenges faced by the woman charged to help him. Spanning just two typical days in the life of 16-year-old Angel (Jonan Everett), we're given just enough time to appreciate how tough it will be for him to change his circumstances. There are no easy answers.

We meet Angel in the apartment of Nicole (Rachel Griffiths) and her husband Henry (Denis O'Hare). It isn't quite clear what the relationship between Angel and the couple is, but we know he's been invited to sleep over. Only later do we realize that Nicole is Angel's generous social worker, and he has nowhere else to go. Henry is not pleased by the arrangement but tries to engage Angel, with little success. They're from different planets.

Continue reading: Angel Rodriguez Review

Step Up Review


OK
Advertising materials tell us all we need to know about Step Up. She's a little bit Fame, and he's a little bit West Side Story. She's an ice queen, while he's a Vanilla Ice clone. We get it. Yet choreographer-turned-director Anne Fletcher does everything short of laying down railroad track and positioning her leads on opposite sides to hammer home the from-different-worlds hook that carries her fleet-footed tween fairy tale.Channing Tatum fills the baggy jeans of street-tough foster kid Tyler - all the truly edgy names must have been taken. Using a baseball cap and blank stare as method tools, the actor aims for the fiery rebellion of James Dean or early Richard Gere but achieves a flatness reserved for James Franco.This watered-down Eminem walks his own 8 Mile until the cops bust him for vandalizing property at the Maryland School of the Arts. Tasked with serving 200 hours of community service, Tyler mouths off to authority (Rachel Griffiths, longing for her Six Feet Under days), romances self-centered dancer Nora (Jenna Dewan), and discovers a career path that might one day lead him out of the ghetto.Fletcher's resume is littered with professional choreography jobs on films like Bring it On and Ice Princess. She pours her creative juice into this film's numerous dance routines, and it's during those moments that Step Up shows flashes of potential. Tatum and Dewan have limited ability as dramatic actors, but each can move to the beat with the best of them.Fletcher desperately needs someone in her cast to - pardon the pun - step up and elevate the film past the stacks of storytelling clichés cranked out by screenwriters Duane Adler and Melissa Rosenberg. Their script half tries, with unfinished results. Days after Tyler arrives on campus, Nora's dance partner conveniently drops out of her senior routine with a temporary injury. Nora's mother frowns on her unyielding dedication to dance, yet pays for her daughter to attend a private arts program. When Step Up reaches beyond the dance floor, exploring a gang grudge that leads to the death of someone close to Tyler, the movie fatally stumbles and never regains its footing.Step up? How 'bout you step off!?

Blow Dry Review


Weak
Hmmm, what's this movie with Josh Hartnett and Rachael Leigh Cook on the cover? Must be some nutty teen comedy, right?

Well, with one cancer diagnosis and one death in the first 15 minutes, Blow Dry is hardly the feel-good romance you'd expect. Strikingly similar to The Big Tease, Blow Dry tells the story of a haircutting competition that descends on a small town in Britain. Celebrities (well, celebrity stylists) from around England arrive to compete, and the local boys get into the act as well. But while the drama unfolds with models and shears, another drama takes place among the locals -- largely involving various romances and a singular cancer victim.

Continue reading: Blow Dry Review

Cosi Review


Good
Cute but predictable, Cosi revolves around the cute-but-predictable premise of a group of insane asylum inmates who put on a rendition of the opera Cosi fan Tutte despite having no acting or singing ability whatsoever (not to mention a lack of sanity). Highlights include the always-on Collette, Barry Otto (channelling Geoffrey Rush), and Ben Mendelsohn (channelling Noah Taylor). Odd, yet cute and, you know, predictable.

Blow Review


OK
In the famed cocaine drama Scarface, I remember a lot of gun battles and bowl after bowl of cocaine spilled on the table. I do not remember heartfelt talks with dad, a cancer-stricken girlfriend, and a child custody battle.

Yet such is the world of Blow, the most wildly anticipated drug thriller since, well, last year's Traffic. Welcome to the "based on a true story" tale of George Jung (the inimitable Johnny Depp), just a suburban boy from New England who tires of his conservative life and heads for -- where else -- L.A. Here (in the 1960s, natch), Jung hooks up with the local hair stylist/drug dealer and starts his own small pot distributorship. Soon enough he's running drugs back to Boston with the help of his friends and flight attendant girlfriend (Run Lola Run's Franka Potente). But just as he's made a name for himself, he gets busted and lands in prison.

Continue reading: Blow Review

Ned Kelly Review


Weak

Plied with fiction and short on depth, the new biopic of legendary Australian outlaw Ned Kelly plays like "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" without the excitement, charm and humor.

Bearded and brooding but otherwise uncharismatic, Heath Ledger stars as the folk-hero bushranger (Aussie for "cowboy"), who according to this film was an upstanding citizen of the Outback frontier until contemptible, crooked, downright sinister lawmen drove him to a life of crime by picking on his family.

They jailed his ma, molested his teenage sister, and falsely accused him and his brothers of horse rustling. They "started a war" against us, Kelly says in voice-over. "So I killed their coppers. I robbed their banks."

Continue reading: Ned Kelly Review

Blow Dry Review


Weak

"Blow Dry" is a leaden British dramedy about an estranged family of hairdressers reconciling when a big coiffeur competition comes to their small town. Like "The Big Tease" -- a similarly themed English mockumentary that came out last year, delaying the release of this one -- its laughs come mostly from tired flamboyancy stereotypes.

Hairdressers with over-styled, out-of-date dos and David Copperfield-like showmanship bite each other's backs to win what is apparently a prestigious award for clever and speedy hair cutting. Meanwhile a sad-sack local barber (Alan Rickman) enters the competition with his son (Josh Hartnett, "The Virgin Suicides") to face down his former salon partner (Bill Nighy), now the nation's star hairdresser and the dirty-tricking front-runner in the contest.

Besides suffering from the same problems "The Big Tease" had -- basically that it's a cliché-riddled underdog sports movie with a dye job and a limp wrist -- "Blow Dry" is also saddled with a maudlin, comedy-antidote subplot about Rickman's estranged lesbian ex-wife (Natasha Richardson), who is bravely dying of cancer 10 years after leaving him for his hair model (a criminally under-used Rachel Griffiths). Brought together again by the competition, everybody gets busy forgiving.

Continue reading: Blow Dry Review

Rachel Griffiths

Rachel Griffiths Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Advertisement
Advertisement

Rachel Griffiths Movies

Hacksaw Ridge Trailer

Hacksaw Ridge Trailer

In 1919 Desmond Doss was born, he lived a quiet life and always wanted to...

Advertisement
Saving Mr. Banks Movie Review

Saving Mr. Banks Movie Review

This true story only barely avoids becoming sloppily sentimental, thanks to a solid cast and...

Saving Mr. Banks Trailer

Saving Mr. Banks Trailer

P.L. Travers was an Australian author who, in the early sixties, went into negotiations with...

Advertisement
Beautiful Kate Movie Review

Beautiful Kate Movie Review

As an Australian Outback family takes a trip down memory lane, this film is anything...

Angel Rodriguez Movie Review

Angel Rodriguez Movie Review

Angel Rodriguez is a small-scale and elegantly understated look at one troubled urban teen's dilemmas...

Step Up Movie Review

Step Up Movie Review

Advertising materials tell us all we need to know about Step Up. She's a little...

Step Up Movie Review

Step Up Movie Review

Advertising materials tell us all we need to know about Step Up. She's a little...

The Hard Word Movie Review

The Hard Word Movie Review

At first I thought it was an Aussie take on a heist film, with a...

The Rookie Movie Review

The Rookie Movie Review

The Rookie, as you may have figured out from its television advertising blitz, is the...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.