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Sin City: A Dame to Kill For Review


Good

It's taken nearly 10 years for filmmaker Robert Rodriguez and graphic novelist Frank Miller to get around to making this sequel, but it was worth the wait because the technical advancements make this second triptych of stories even more visually stunning, and the emotional resonance is even stronger. This is a lean, mean noir thriller that doesn't waste a single moment as it rips through three interlocking plots that centre on revenge for the events of the first movie.

Two people are out to get even with the ruthlessly nasty politician Roark (Powers Booth). Watched over by the hulking Marv (Mickey Rourke), gun-toting stripper Nancy (Jessica Alba) is still heartbroken after Roark killed her beloved Hartigan (Bruce Willis), who appears to her as a ghostly apparition. And Johnny (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is determined to bring Roark down by humiliating him at his own high-stakes poker game, even though merely having uncanny good luck might not be enough. But the main story centres on private eye Dwight (Josh Brolin), who is stopped in his tracks when he encounters his old flame Ava (Eva Green), a bombshell who has power over most men she meets. She asks for help with a domestic problem, and Dwight is powerless to walk away even though he knows something is fishy.

As before, these stories unfold exactly as they would in a graphic novel, with blunt dialogue and strikingly visual imagery black and white that's spotted with flashes of colour. Aside from Ava's blue coat, that colour is usually red: hair, nails, lips, but not blood, which splashes in glaring white. It looks fantastic in (ahem) eye-popping 3D. And it's fiercely violent as death hovers around the residents of Basin City, especially the lawless Old Town district. But there's just as much emphasis on surging passion, including some surprisingly graphic sexuality that plays up how helpless men are around a scantily clad woman. Indeed, it's rare to see an action film in which the women are so resolutely in charge.

Continue reading: Sin City: A Dame to Kill For Review

Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For - International Trailer


It's all about revenge in Sin City now as the wounded (both physically and mentally) set out on a trail of death and destruction in a bid to make sure justice is served in their town. Dwight McCarthy is on another rescue mission to save an abused wife as Ava Lord claims she is a prisoner at the hands of her wealthy husband Damien. Unfortunately, it seems her intentions are of the dishonest kind. Thought to be have been executed, Marv wakes up among several corpses with little memory of his alleged crimes, but a strong desire for vengeance. Nancy is heartbroken to the point of insanity following  police officer John Hartigan's suicide, and there's no stopping her when she decides to sentence the father of child-killer Roark Junior, Senator Roark, to death. Notorious gambler Johnny is a newbie in the town with his own scores to settle, but it isn't long before he realises he's messing with criminals much bigger than him.

The second instalment of the 'Sin City' film franchise 'Sin City: A Dame To Kill For' is due for release nearly ten years following the 2005 original. Author of the original graphic novel Frank Miller ('300', 'Batman: The Dark Knight Returns', 'Daredevil: Born Again') has adapted the screenplay and co-directs the movie with Robert Rodriguez ('Machete', 'Once Upon a Time in Mexico', 'From Dusk Till Dawn'). 'Sin City 2' is set to hit UK screens on August 25th 2014.

Click here to read Sin City 2: A Dame To Kill For movie review

10 Rules for Sleeping Around Premiere

Powers Boothe - 10 Rules for Sleeping Around Premiere - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 2nd April 2014

Powers Boothe

Premiere of '10 Rules For Sleeping Around' - Arrivals

Powers Boothe - Los Angeles premiere of '10 Rules For Sleeping Around' held at the Egyptian Theatre - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 1st April 2014

Powers Boothe and Leslie Greif
Powers Boothe and Leslie Greif
Powers Boothe

Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Trailer


The everlasting trail of violence, death and deceit continues with the return of several characters from the original ‘Sin City’ movie. Dwight McCarthy is back, this time running to the rescue of his ex-girlfriend Ava Lord who claims she is being abused by her wealthy husband Damien; he has his own reasons for wanting to help her, but he could be in for a nasty surprise. The framed and punished Marv wakes up after supposed execution by electric chair only to find that he is lying amongst several dead bodies and can’t remember how he ended up there. Following, her near miss at the hands of serial child-killer Roark Junior, Nancy struggles to deal with the painful death of her rescuer, police officer John Hartigan. Plus, a new face shows up in Sin City, a gambler named Johnny who lands himself in mortal danger when he tries to take on the town’s most formidable villain.

Continue: Sin City: A Dame To Kill For Trailer

A Special Screening of EPIXs Documentary MILIUS

Zak Knutson Thomas Jane Mark Greenberg John Milius Joey Figueroa Powers Boothe - E[ix and The USC School of Cinematic Arts Present a special Screening of "MILIUS". Milius will premiere on Epix on Saturday January 11 at 8pm. Milius examines the life story of one of the most influential and controversial film directors in the history of Hollywood, John Milius. - LA, California, United States - Friday 10th January 2014

Thomas Jane
Thomas Jane
Thomas Jane
Thomas Jane
Thomas Jane

A Special Screening of EPIXs Documentary MILIUS

Powers Boothe - E[ix and The USC School of Cinematic Arts Present a special Screening of "MILIUS". Milius will premiere on Epix on Saturday January 11 at 8pm. Milius examines the life story of one of the most influential and controversial film directors in the history of Hollywood, John Milius. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 9th January 2014

MacGruber Review


Grim
Will Forte transfers his Saturday Night Live character to the big screen but forgets to bring along what made those sketches so hilarious. Instead of any actual comedy, this film merely resorts to easy gross-out mayhem.

MacGruber (Forte) has been presumed dead for 10 years after the villainous Dieter (Kilmer) blew up his wedding, including his bride (Rudolph). But now Dieter has a Russian nuke aimed at Washington, and only MacGruber can stop him.

Recruited by a colonel (Booth), MacGruber bumbles through the operation, rescued frequently by his former colleague and current love interest Vicki (Wiig) and bright-spark sidekick Piper (Philippe). But time is running out for an '80s-style hero struggling to adapt to the 21st century.

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Premiere of '2 Dudes and a Dream' at the Arclight Theatre in Hollywood

Powers Boothe Tuesday 3rd February 2009 Premiere of '2 Dudes and a Dream' at the Arclight Theatre in Hollywood Los Angeles, California

Nixon Review


Good
History has not been much kinder to Nixon the movie than it was to Nixon the man. Grossing under $14 million domestically, the $50 million movie was an enormous box office flop (what 1995-era family wouldn't want to go catch Nixon on Christmas Day?), though four Oscar nominations (it won none) must have softened the blow somewhat for auteur director Oliver Stone.

With Nixon, Stone struggles to present a thoughtful biography of one of history's most reviled leaders and the only President in modern times to voluntarily leave office before the end of his term. Richard Nixon of course needs no introduction, and Stone takes a much different approach to the material here than he did with JFK, which remains one of my favorite films ever. Rather than focus on a single incident -- Watergate -- Stone endeavors to encompass Nixon's entire life and career, from his days as a young Quaker (complete with dying brothers) to two big failed runs at political office to the entirety of his troubled political career. All the highlights are here, at least in part: Kent State, China, Vietnam and Cambodia, and of course the tragic events of Watergate.

Continue reading: Nixon Review

Red Dawn Review


Grim
I wonder if someone tossed a copy of Red Dawn into Ronald Reagan's casket before they buried the old guy. I can't imagine a movie he would have loved more. A highly absurd Gipper-era relic, it makes the "Evil Empire" days of 1984 seem like a million years ago. Anyone under the age of 35 will watch this propaganda exercise about a terrifyingly successful Soviet invasion of small-town America and say, "Huh???"

Ignoring the outrageous jingoism for a minute, it should be noted that the movie does have plenty of forward momentum, starting from the moment when a bunch of Wyoming high schoolers (all '80s A- and B-list Brat Packers) look out their classroom window and see a huge number of paratroopers dropping into town. The soldiers who don't speak Russian speak Spanish. It seems that the Soviets have made a successful nuclear first strike (hey, that's cheating!) and have joined forces with ominously swarthy Cuban and Nicaraguan troops to storm a suddenly crippled America. The kids don't know all of this yet, though. All they know is that one of the soldiers has murdered their teacher right in front of them. Godless Commies!

Continue reading: Red Dawn Review

Red Dawn Review


Grim
I wonder if someone tossed a copy of Red Dawn into Ronald Reagan's casket before they buried the old guy. I can't imagine a movie he would have loved more. A highly absurd Gipper-era relic, it makes the "Evil Empire" days of 1984 seem like a million years ago. Anyone under the age of 35 will watch this propaganda exercise about a terrifyingly successful Soviet invasion of small-town America and say, "Huh???"

Ignoring the outrageous jingoism for a minute, it should be noted that the movie does have plenty of forward momentum, starting from the moment when a bunch of Wyoming high schoolers (all '80s A- and B-list Brat Packers) look out their classroom window and see a huge number of paratroopers dropping into town. The soldiers who don't speak Russian speak Spanish. It seems that the Soviets have made a successful nuclear first strike (hey, that's cheating!) and have joined forces with ominously swarthy Cuban and Nicaraguan troops to storm a suddenly crippled America. The kids don't know all of this yet, though. All they know is that one of the soldiers has murdered their teacher right in front of them. Godless Commies!

Continue reading: Red Dawn Review

Sudden Death Review


Grim
There are Die Hard clones, and there is Sudden Death. How identical are these two films? Instead of taking place in an office building, Sudden Death takes place in a hockey arena. Star Jean-Claude Van Damme isn't a cop; he's a fireman. His wife isn't held hostage; his daughter is. The villains don't want bearer bonds; they want money transfers. The computer geek isn't black; he's white.

Continue reading: Sudden Death Review

Attila Review


Grim
It's been rumored in some history books that Attila the Hun died of an exploding blood clot while in the throes of sexual ecstasy -- what a way to go, huh?

Unfortunately, that's a scene you won't find in the USA Network's made-for-television Attila, the latest attempt to cash in on the success of Gladiator. A boy becomes a warrior who becomes a king powerful enough to challenge an empire. Are you not entertained?

Continue reading: Attila Review

U Turn Review


Excellent
I can't imagine U Turn in any director's hands except Oliver Stone's. Breaking free from his political obsessions, Stone explores new territory, giving the material a stark edge, innovation, and a thick, memorable atmosphere. In one film he investigates adultery, incest, bad luck, Indian philosophy, gambling, paranoia, murder, deception, fraud, money, and the Russian Mafia. This is an original tale with a full plate, but surprisingly U Turn never feels crowded, contrived, or recycled. It's a feast for the senses, as long as you have a strong stomach.

Similar to Natural Born Killers in style, the film includes black & white inserts, frequent use of hand-held cameras, overexposed shots, vivid close-ups, zip-switches from smooth to grainy, unique camera angles, time-lapse sequences, and hallucinogenic effects. Stone rounded up some of his Nixon crew to establish the technical aspects of the film, including director of photography Robert Richardson, production designer Victor Kempster, and editors Hank Corwin and Thomas Nordberg. The crew shot U Turn in just 42 days, entirely on location in the actual town of Superior, Arizona, fully utilizing the vast landscape. According to the film's production information, the filmmakers revamped four blocks of Superior's main street, even creating new restaurants out of unused storefronts.

Continue reading: U Turn Review

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