Philip Bosco

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Philip Bosco Thursday 22nd April 2010 The opening night of the Roundabout Theatre Company's Broadway musical 'Sondheim On Sondheim' - arrivals New York City, USA

Philip Bosco Monday 6th April 2009 Roundabout Theatre Company's 2009 Spring Gala held at Roseland Ballroom - Arrivals New York City, USA

Philip Bosco

Philip Bosco and Nancy Ann Dunkle Bosco - Philip Bosco and Nancy Ann Dunkle Bosco New York City, USA - Opening Night of 'Les Liaisons Dangereuses' at the American Airlines Theatre Thursday 1st May 2008

Philip Bosco and Nancy Ann Dunkle Bosco
Philip Bosco and Nancy Ann Dunkle Bosco
Philip Bosco

The Savages Review


Very Good
Tamara Jenkins' The Savages opens with old people acting their age: playing a few holes of golf, aqua-aerobics, and even a dance troupe fitted with matching blue-and-silver leotards. Ideally, this is the way to slip into one's golden years; at least for one's kin. Quickly, however, we are introduced to Leonard Savage (Philip Bosco) eating a bowl a cereal at the Sun City home he shares with his catatonic girlfriend. When Lenny is chastised by a living aide for not flushing the toilet, he pulls a de Sade and writes "Prick" on the wall with his excrement. This is how the other half ages.

On the other side of the country, Lenny's two kids are busying themselves with crap jobs while they attempt to be acclaimed writers. Wendy (Laura Linney) temps at data-entry cubicles in New York City, using their copiers and mailing capabilities to apply for Guggenheim fellowships. When she can, she also sneaks into the supply room and steals her weight in pens and paper. She comes home to a message on her answering machine about her father's incident and panics. Meanwhile, Jon (Philip Seymour Hoffman) teaches at a second-rate Buffalo college as he attempts to finish research for a book on Bertolt Brecht. When Wendy pleads for him to help her hunt down their father, Jon responds with lethargic wit: "This is not a Sam Shepard play."

Continue reading: The Savages Review

Kate & Leopold Review


Excellent
At first glance, Kate & Leopold appears to be a fairly run-of-the-mill romantic fantasy. A successful, 21st century woman meets the Duke of Albany circa 1876, via a hiccup in the time-space continuum. And although they can't find true love within their own generations, it might be possible with one another. Sounds like a recipe for a safe, mushy Hollywood movie, so what makes this film different? It's the way writer-director James Mangold (Copland, Girl,Interrupted) avoids stereotype, with an intelligent, crowd-pleasing take on the time travel love story. It's smart enough to remind us just how stupid a movie like Just Visiting is.

And not only is the storytelling sharp, but the characters are too. Meg Ryan (not too perky, not too whiny) is Kate McKay, working her way up the NYC corporate ladder, but too busy for love after a four-year relationship with her brilliant ex, Stuart (Liev Schreiber). When Stuart discovers an open portal in the fabric of time -- you have to jump off the Brooklyn Bridge at just the right time -- he accidentally brings the 19th century Duke back to modern-day New York. Everyone involved, including Ryan's kid brother Charlie (the underrated Breckin Meyer), clearly has some baggage and life experience, and Mangold's script (co-written with Steven Rogers) clues us in without clobbering us.

Continue reading: Kate & Leopold Review

Children Of A Lesser God Review


Very Good
In my mind there are two types of metaphor movies: those that kick and those that scream. Those that scream take their metaphors and make them painfully obvious to the viewer. We can't help but notice them. Those that kick, on the other hand, have metaphors that are silent and effective. Children of a Lesser God was a metaphor movie that kicked.

Based on the stage play, Children of a Lesser God is a metaphor movie about a hearing man's romance with a deaf woman. On the surface, it functions as a sympathy grabber for the hearing disabled, and a movie we can smile at because of William Hurt's gallant attempt to help deaf children speak, live normal lives, and, even, sing (albeit to cheesy songs but in one of the most fun and touching scenes captured on film). That is the skin deep surface, which would have been enough to make it a crowd pleaser and would have kept it from being torn to pieces by the critics.

Continue reading: Children Of A Lesser God Review

Hitch Review


Weak
Hitch asks one question: Just how far can a film coast on Will Smith's charm and some hilariously bad dance moves? The answer is, pretty far, but not nearly far enough.

Smith plays the titular hero, a guy who's so smooth he turned it into a career as a "date doctor," helping a succession of schlubby but good-hearted guys make it into the arms of gorgeous women who otherwise wouldn't have looked twice at them. But although he's like a consultant for romance, Hitch doesn't use his powers to find true love for himself, leaving marriage and lasting relationships for his clients. This leaves him with plenty of energy to devote to his newest project: Albert (Kevin James, very funny), a nervous, fumble-thumbed accountant desperately in love with one of his clients, the ridiculously wealthy and beautiful heiress Allegra (Amber Valletta, who comes closer to approximating an actual actress in each film she's in) and needs help getting her to notice him. A few quick lessons from Hitch, which include a nicely-played Cyrano scene (and a dancing tutorial that contains most of the film's few true laughs), and Albert begins to blossom into a confident, impressive romantic who looks sure to make Allegra fall for him. It's light stuff, to be sure, but often played with a disarmingly sweet touch by both James and Valletta and enjoyable enough. But then the film feels the need to add in a whole other storyline, and that's where the problems start.

Continue reading: Hitch Review

The Time Machine (2002) Review


Weak
Guy Pearce remakes his second film of the year with The Time Machine... and it's barely March. Unfortunately, he had considerably better luck with The Count of Monte Cristo than with this limp retread.

Then again, the original Time Machine wasn't really anything special - a bunch of bad makeup effects and a weak plot. This time out the makeup's better but the story's a total loss.

Continue reading: The Time Machine (2002) Review

The Time MacHine Review


OK

In 1960, director George Pal created a rather quaint film version of H.G. Wells' "The Time Machine" which was such a product of its day that now its doom-saying 20th Century nuclear war and its 800th Century society of idyllic, primitive blonde imbeciles seem far more like silly cinematic nostalgia than legitimate futurism.

Hollywood style de jour strikes again in this year's equally time-stamped yet curiously engaging remake, starring Guy Pearce ("Memento") as Alexander Hartdegen, Wells' late-19th Century intellectual aristocratic who travels through time in a handsome Victorian-era Rube Goldberg contraption of brass, glass and spinning dials.

Directed by Wells' great-grandson Simon Wells, the 2002 "Time Machine" opens with a modern movie motivational gimmick: It seems the murder of his true love drives our hero's desire to fiddle with temporal physics. After an obligatory failed attempt to turn back the clock and save her, Alexander heads into the future, hoping to somehow understand why he can't change the past.

Continue reading: The Time MacHine Review

Philip Bosco

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Philip Bosco Movies

The Savages Trailer

The Savages Trailer

The Savages Trailer The Savages, directed by Tamara Jenkins, starring Laura Linney, Philip Seymour Hoffman,...

The Savages Movie Review

The Savages Movie Review

Tamara Jenkins' The Savages opens with old people acting their age: playing a few holes...

Freedom Land Trailer

Freedom Land Trailer

Revolution Studios' powerful drama Freedomland is a highly charged and gritty mystery of a carjacking,...

Kate & Leopold Movie Review

Kate & Leopold Movie Review

At first glance, Kate & Leopold appears to be a fairly run-of-the-mill romantic fantasy....

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Hitch Movie Review

Hitch Movie Review

Hitch asks one question: Just how far can a film coast on Will Smith's charm...

The Time Machine (2002) Movie Review

The Time Machine (2002) Movie Review

Guy Pearce remakes his second film of the year with The Time Machine... and it's...

The Time MacHine Movie Review

The Time MacHine Movie Review

In 1960, director George Pal created a rather quaint film version of H.G. Wells' "The...

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