Peter Weir

Peter Weir

Peter Weir Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

Paramount Developing 'The Truman Show' For TV Adaptation


Jim Carrey Laura Linney Peter Weir

For a film that depicted one man’s journey as he unwittingly became a staple diet of American’s TV-watching public, it’s perhaps fitting that The Truman Show should be adapted for the small screen by Paramount.

Truman ShowImage: The Truman Show soundtrack

The studio, as Paramount exec Amy Powell told The Wrap, will be looking to use a host of content to make the series happen. Including The Truman Show itself, their owned novels, screenplays and non-fiction that could all contribute to the development of a small screen adaptation. 

Continue reading: Paramount Developing 'The Truman Show' For TV Adaptation

The Way Back Review


Good
Based on real events that are outrageously inspiring, this epic-style movie is packed with emotion and adventure, although it also feels a little overlong and meandering, mainly due to the narrative itself.

In 1939 Poland, Janusz (Sturgess) is charged by the Soviets with spying and sent to a Siberian gulag. In the middle of the bitter winter, he and six other prisoners manage to escape: veteran American (Harris), hothead Russian criminal (Farrell), helpful comic (Bucur), artist (Potodean), nice-guy Latvian (Skarsgard) and night-blind youngster (Urzendowsky). The first 300 miles to Lake Baikal almost kills them, but they've only just begun the 4,000-mile trek to freedom in India. And they've also picked up a young Polish girl (Ronan).

Continue reading: The Way Back Review

'The Way Back' UK premiere at the Curzon Mayfair - Arrivals

Peter Weir - Director Peter Weir and guest London, England - 'The Way Back' UK premiere at the Curzon Mayfair - Arrivals Wednesday 8th December 2010

'The Way Back' UK premiere at the Curzon Mayfair - Arrivals

Peter Weir - Director Peter Weir London, England - 'The Way Back' UK premiere at the Curzon Mayfair - Arrivals Wednesday 8th December 2010

Photocall for 'The Way Back' held at Claridges.

Ed Harris, Colin Farrell, Jim Sturgess, Peter Weir and Saoirse Ronan - Ed Harris, Colin Farrell, Saoirse Ronan, Jim Sturgess, Peter Weir London, England - Photocall for 'The Way Back' held at Claridges. Wednesday 8th December 2010

Ed Harris, Colin Farrell, Jim Sturgess, Peter Weir and Saoirse Ronan
Ed Harris, Colin Farrell, Jim Sturgess, Peter Weir and Saoirse Ronan
Ed Harris, Colin Farrell, Jim Sturgess, Peter Weir and Saoirse Ronan

Photocall for 'The Way Back' held at Claridges.

Peter Weir Wednesday 8th December 2010 Photocall for 'The Way Back' held at Claridges. London, England

Peter Weir
Peter Weir

The Way Back Trailer


For anyone in the 1940 being held prisoner in a Siberian gulag they knew their lives might not last much longer, when seven inmates hatch -and successfully carry out - a plan to escape under the cover of a blizzard they do not know what their next move will be. Surrounded by unforgiving terrain and traitorous weather conditions, the group decide their only hope is to walk to safety.

Continue: The Way Back Trailer

The Cars That Ate Paris Review


Grim
Along with Paris, Texas, this is the other movie with Paris in the title that's not about Paris, France.

Rather, this Paris is in New South Wales, Australia. And the cars don't really eat it, either. The residents of the town do. Er, they eat the visitors to the town. Er, they don't eat them... ah, skip it. Let's start again.

Continue reading: The Cars That Ate Paris Review

The Year of Living Dangerously Review


Good
Five bucks if you can remember where and when the heralded Year of Living Dangerously is set. No, not Vietnam or Cambodia. It's actually 1965 Indonesia, when a boring assignment turns "dangerous" for Aussie journalist Guy Hamilton (Mel Gibson) when the country's revolution unexpectedly begins. Soon he's involved with a diplomat (Sigourney Weaver) when not running amok with photographer pal Billy Kwan, a half-Chinese dwarf man -- memorably played by non-Chinese, non-dwarf, non-male Linda Hunt, who deservedly won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar. The rest of the film hasn't aged nearly as well as Hunt's fun performance, though.

The Last Wave Review


Weak
What you say? Aussie lawyer Richard Chamberlain takes a strange trip into his psyche (he constantly dreams of floods and tsunamis) and into Aboriginal mysticism when he defends a young native against a murder charge. The Aborigine takes him into the sewers, where he is pelted with questions like "Are you a fish!? Are you a snake!? Are you a man!?" We're going with fish, but that's just us.

I've never really understood the fascination with this film, widely heralded as a masterpiece from Peter Weir (more widely known now for The Truman Show). It's creepy to watch Chamberlain's David Burton get sucked deeper and deeper into a freaky end-of-the-world prophecy and a secret society living underground (half of which is revealed through dreams, with David bolting awake screaming, every 10 minutes), but drawing any kind of useful conclusion from the film is difficult. (And the nonstop didgeridoo music is enough to drive you crazy.) I've seen the movie a few times and continue to wonder what the point was supposed to be.

Continue reading: The Last Wave Review

The Cars That Ate Paris Review


Grim
Along with Paris, Texas, this is the other movie with Paris in the title that's not about Paris, France.

Rather, this Paris is in New South Wales, Australia. And the cars don't really eat it, either. The residents of the town do. Er, they eat the visitors to the town. Er, they don't eat them... ah, skip it. Let's start again.

Continue reading: The Cars That Ate Paris Review

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Review


Essential
After viewing the trailer for Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, you might think the film is out of place for its November release. After all, giant epics like this fuel special-effects-thirsty summer moviegoers. Fall is usually reserved for smaller, higher quality films commanding the attention of Oscar voters. 20th Century Fox had originally scheduled Master and Commander for a June release - that is, (I'm sure) until they realized what an extraordinary and award-worthy film they had.

Master and Commander is based on Patrick O'Brian's series of novels called Aubrey/Maturin about the British navy during the Napoleonic Wars. The film takes place in 1805, when the French rule the high seas. An English vessel, the HMS Surprise, roams the same oceans looking to carry out the official order of intercepting any French ship they encounter. The captain of the Surprise, Jack Aubrey (Russell Crowe), refuses to accept defeat at the hands of the French and is willing to carry out his assignment at any cost.

Continue reading: Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Review

Peter Weir

Peter Weir Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS