Peter Finch

Peter Finch

Peter Finch Quick Links

News Film Quotes RSS

The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) Review


Excellent
This exciting and underseen film features James Stewart at the top of his late-career game, offering the far-fetched yet strangely compelling tale of a group of air crash survivors who, trapped in the Sahara Desert and with no other options in sight, decide to build a miniature plane out of the giant air hulk they crashed in. Sure, the odds of crashing your plane with a flotilla of tools, jet fuel, pressed dates, and a welding apparatus -- but without a working radio or much water -- isn't exactly believable, but somehow director Robert Aldrich (The Dirty Dozen) makes it work, and work well. Will this bizarre contraption really work? It's two and a half nail-biting hours during which personalities violently crash, schemes are hatched, and a career-making secret is revealed.

Continue reading: The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) Review

The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) Review


Excellent
This exciting and underseen film features James Stewart at the top of his late-career game, offering the far-fetched yet strangely compelling tale of a group of air crash survivors who, trapped in the Sahara Desert and with no other options in sight, decide to build a miniature plane out of the giant air hulk they crashed in. Sure, the odds of crashing your plane with a flotilla of tools, jet fuel, pressed dates, and a welding apparatus -- but without a working radio or much water -- isn't exactly believable, but somehow director Robert Aldrich (The Dirty Dozen) makes it work, and work well. Will this bizarre contraption really work? It's two and a half nail-biting hours during which personalities violently crash, schemes are hatched, and a career-making secret is revealed.

Continue reading: The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) Review

The Red Tent Review


Good
Since they realized they were there, explorers everywhere have had a fascination with visiting the poles of the earth. By 1928, the North Pole had been well visited and documented by the likes of Peary and Amundsen, but Italian Umberto Nobile decided he wanted to head up there anyway. Only Nobile's crackpot idea was to go there in a blimp.

Strangely, because of Nobile's renown in working with Amundsen on his 1926 flight to the Pole, no one said this was a bad idea. One day after daparting, heavy wind ripped the blimp apart, stranding the crew on the Arctic ice, where they holed up in a makeshift red tent, waiting for aid to arrive. For a month they were presumed dead, until an amateur radio operator picked up a transmission. A massive rescue operation commenced, with Amundsen himself even getting in on the deal.

Continue reading: The Red Tent Review

Network Review


Essential
This groundbreaking film is a rare example of a really god satire that was popular with film critics and the public -- and even with entertainment industry insiders, who might not be expected to get the joke or appreciate the abuse. (I guess Hollywood has always had a condescending attitude toward TV, which explains the Oscars that Network received.)

One evening, Howard Beale (Peter Finch), a network news anchor, becomes fed up with the pablum of network news, decides he's mad as hell, he can't take it any more, and he's going to start telling the truth (or kill himself). Panicked producers fire him, but not before his ratings soar; so he's brought back as a commentator. Over the next few weeks, Beale becomes increasingly unstable and even delusional, but continues to tell the truth. The network's ratings soar, driving events forward to a tragic conclusion.

Continue reading: Network Review

Peter Finch

Peter Finch Quick Links

News Film Quotes RSS