Peter Cook

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Hampton Classic Horseshow 2013

Peter Cook and Suzanne Shaw Cook - Celebrities attends the 38th Annual Hampton Classic Horseshow - Bridgehampton, NY, United States - Sunday 1st September 2013

Grand Prix Sunday at the 2013 Hampton Classic

Peter Cook - Grand Prix Sunday at the 2013 Hampton Classic - Bridgehampton, NY, United States - Sunday 1st September 2013

Peter Cook
Peter Cook
Peter Cook

The Hampton Classic 2012 Grand Prix Closing Day

Peter Cook - Peter Cook and Sailor Cook Sunday 2nd September 2012 The Hampton Classic 2012 Grand Prix Closing Day

1st Annual Compound Foundation 'Fostering A Legacy' Benefit

Peter Cook and Suzanne Shaw - Peter Cook with wife Suzanne Shaw Cook Saturday 14th July 2012 1st Annual Compound Foundation 'Fostering A Legacy' Benefit

Peter Cook and Suzanne Shaw
Peter Cook and Suzanne Shaw
Peter Cook and Suzanne Shaw
Peter Cook and Suzanne Shaw

The Princess Bride Review


Extraordinary
Who among us has never uttered the line, "My name is Inigo Montoya..."? Standing as one of the most eminently quotable films ever made -- this side of Monty Python and the Holy Grail, anyway.

Ostensibly a children's fairy tale about a farmer's daughter (Robin Wright), her poor lover Westley (Cary Elwes), the prince (Chris Sarandon) who catches her eye, and the battle that develops among them all. Filled with memorable supporting characters -- Wallace Shawn's Vizzini ("Inconceivable!!!"), Mandy Patinkin's Inigo, Andre the Giant's Fezzik, and Christopher Guest's six-fingered man, The Princess Bride is as much fun as you can have in a film. Even the fringe characters (Peter Cook's priest, Carol Kane's nagging wife, Mel Smith's albino torturer) are hilarious and unforgettable. And director Rob Reiner has imbued this film with so much pure joy that you can't help but want to watch it over and over.

Continue reading: The Princess Bride Review

Supergirl Review


Unbearable
So let me see if I get this straight: Dopey Kara (Helen Slater) is sitting around on a fragment of the former planet Krypton when she stupidly tears a hole in the protective bubble that keeps the city safe from the external world. Whoops, the city's power source -- a little ball that fits in your hand which Kara is playing with (!!!) -- gets sucked out the hole, dooming the city and all its residents to certain death. Then, as her dad (Peter O'Toole!) sentences himself to eternity in the Phantom Zone (where Zod and his crew were sent), Kara mopes around and sits on a chair... which turns out to be an escape pod straight to earth! Zoom, she's safe, and, after zipping up out of the lake she lands in, she's Supergirl (complete with costume).

This is Superman's cousin?

Continue reading: Supergirl Review

Yellowbeard Review


Weak
Long missing on DVD, Yellowbeard is that strangest of combinations: A Cheech and Chong movie melded with a Monty Python movie.

And not in a very good way.

Continue reading: Yellowbeard Review

Alice In Wonderland (1966) Review


Weak
It doesn't take the Ravi Shankar soundtrack to cue you that this version of Alice in Wonderland -- just an hour long, shot for the BBC -- hails from the 1960s. Taking the story's thinly veiled drug metaphors to their ultra-serious limit, the movie has a bit of a Cheech and Chong feeling to it, and the star power of John Gielgud, Peter Sellers, and Peter Cook (among many others) conspire to ensure that Alice (Anne-Marie Mallik) doesn't even got top billing. This was one of the first of director Jonathan Miller's numerous BBC teleplays, and his greenness is apparent -- it's neither kid-friendly (the actors don't wear animal costumes, they just allude to them) nor particularly clever, coming across in the end like a kind of Alice's Greatest Hits. Finally, I know it was 1966 television, but Alice just never works in black and white. It's like The Wizard of Oz without the yellow brick road.

Bedazzled (1967) Review


OK
I didn't see the original Bedazzled until after the remake, and while it's no masterwork, it's a far better picture. Dudley Moore is well-suited as the dolt who gives up his soul for seven wishes, all in a vain attempt to win the heart of a rather sour woman (Eleanor Bron), but it's Peter Cook (best known to Gen-X as the lisping priest from The Princess Bride) as the devil who is truly memorable. Cute and amusing, but extremely dated.

The Princess Bride Review


Extraordinary
Who among us has never uttered the line, "My name is Inigo Montoya..."? Standing as one of the most eminently quotable films ever made -- this side of Monty Python and the Holy Grail, anyway.

Ostensibly a children's fairy tale about a farmer's daughter (Robin Wright), her poor lover Westley (Cary Elwes), the prince (Chris Sarandon) who catches her eye, and the battle that develops among them all. Filled with memorable supporting characters -- Wallace Shawn's Vizzini ("Inconceivable!!!"), Mandy Patinkin's Inigo, Andre the Giant's Fezzik, and Christopher Guest's six-fingered man, The Princess Bride is as much fun as you can have in a film. Even the fringe characters (Peter Cook's priest, Carol Kane's nagging wife, Mel Smith's albino torturer) are hilarious and unforgettable. And director Rob Reiner has imbued this film with so much pure joy that you can't help but want to watch it over and over.

Continue reading: The Princess Bride Review

Peter Cook

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