Pete Postlethwaite

Pete Postlethwaite

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Biography

Pete Postlethwaite OBE (7.2.1946 - 2.1.2011)
Pete Postlethwaite was a British actor, who worked in stage, film and television, to great acclaim. He was highly revered within his industry and earned himself a number of awards in his time as an actor. Steven Spielberg once referred to him as 'the greatest actor in the world' after they worked together on Jurassic Park: The Lost World.

Childhood: Pete Postlethwaite was born to William and Mary Postlethwaite in Warrington, Lancashire. His family was Roman Catholic and working class. Postlethwaite trained to be a teacher at St. Mary's College, Strawberry Hill. He then went on to teach drama at Loreto College, Manchester, before training to be an actor at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School.

Acting Career: Pete Postlethwaite's career started at the Liverpool Everyman Theatre. His fellow colleagues at that time included Jonathan Pryce Bill Nighy, Julie Walters and Anthony Sher.

In 1981, Pete Postlethwaite landed the leading role in The Muscle Market, which was a spin-off of Boys from the Blackstuff. The series also starred Alison Steadman.

Postlethwaite then went on to land a few smaller parts in TV series such as the Professionals (starring Martin Shaw). His film success started with 1988's Distant Voices, Still Lives. Postlethwaite's film work was sparse for a few years but in 1993, he earned himself an Oscar nomination for his role in In The Name of the Father. The film also starred Daniel Day Lewis and Emma Thompson.

One of Postlethwaite's best-known film roles was playing the mysterious lawyer Mr. Kobayashi in The Usual Suspects, alongside Stephen Baldwin, Gabriel Byrne, Benicio del Toro and Kevin Spacey.

He then went on to feature in a number of successful mainstream films, including Alien 3 (starring Sigourney Weaver), Amistad (with Anthony Hopkins), Brassed Off (featuring Ewan McGregor) and The Shipping News with Julianne Moore and Judi Dench. Pete Postlethwaite then landed a role in the critically acclaimed film The Constant Gardener, along with Rachel Weisz and Ralph Fiennes.

In 2010, Pete Postlethwaite could be seen in the blockbuster Inception, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Marion Cotillard and Ellen Page.

The author Terry Pratchett has stated that he always imagined his Discworld character as a 'younger, slightly bulkier version of Pete Postlethwaite.'

Among Postlethwaite's other notable roles were playing the antagonist Sergeant Obadiah Hakeswill in the ITV series Sharpe, which starred Sean Bean. The two actors then went on to work together again in When Saturday Comes.

In 2008, Postlethwaite returned to the Liverpool Everyman Theatre, where his career began, appearing in a production of King Lear. The following year, he featured in The Age of Stupid, which focused on the topic of climate change. It was a topic close to his heart as he had recently installed a wind turbine in his own garden.

In 2004, Pete Postlethwaite received an OBE in the New Year's Honours List.

Personal Life: In 2003, Pete Postlethwaite married his wife Jackie Morrish, a former BBC producer. They have two children together, William John (b.1999) and Lily Kathleen (b. 1992).

Pete Postlethwaite was diagnosed with testicular cancer in 1990 and had to have a testicle removed. In 2011, he died from cancer, at the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital.



Biography by Contactmusic.com

Killing Bono Review


OK
Based on a true story, this film vividly captures the frustrating randomness of fame. The sharp and funny characters are nicely played, but the plot gets lost along the way, spinning in circles and trying too hard to ramp up the action.

In late-70s Dublin, brothers Neil and Ivan (Barnes and Sheehan) form a band called The Undertakers, creating a friendly rivalry with their friends Paul, David, Larry and Adam (McCann, Mark Griffin, Sean Doyle and David Tudor), who form The Hype. Then The Hype changes its name to U2 and becomes the biggest band in the world. Over the years, Neil's bull-headed attitude scuppers every chance he and Ivan get, even when they find minor fame in London with the help of manager/girlfriend Gloria (Ritter). he also indebts them to an Irish gangster (Townsend).

Continue reading: Killing Bono Review

The Town Review


Excellent
Ben Affleck confirms his directing skills with this sharply made thriller, which carefully maintains a human connection with its characters. It's an astutely observed story, finely told by both cast and crew.

The Charlestown neighbourhood in Boston is a notorious home for bank robbers, and Doug (Affleck) leads fiendishly efficient heists with his brother-like pal Jem (Renner), driver Albert (Slaine) and techie Des (Burke). But Jem's trigger-happy temper almost undoes the last job when he briefly takes bank manager Claire (Hall) hostage. To make sure she's not going to turn them in to tenacious FBI Agent Frawley (Hamm), Doug gets to know her. And of course falls in love, finally seeing a way out of this dodgy life.

Continue reading: The Town Review

Inception Review


Essential
Nolan pulls us into another fiendishly entertaining scenario, engaging our brains while taking us on a thrilling ride. And while the mind-bending story might not be as cerebral as it seems, it completely envelops us.

Cobb (DiCaprio) invades people's dreams for a living, stealing ideas with the help of his sidekick Arthur (Gordon-Levitt). But a new client (Watanabe) wants him to try inception instead: implanting an idea in the mind of media heir Fischer (Murphy). So Cobb hires a new architect (Page) and two other skilled experts (Hardy and Rao) to create an elaborately layered dreamworld for the reverse heist. The problem is that Cobb's wife (Cotillard) is lurking in this alternate reality and could bring the whole plan crashing down around them.

Continue reading: Inception Review

Clash Of The Titans Review


OK
The studio clearly couldn't resist the chance to digitally revisit the creatures so memorably animated by Ray Harryhausen in the 1981 original. The result is an unnecessary remake that's loud, chaotic and mildly entertaining.

Perseus (Worthington) is a demigod who has been raised by humans and now finds himself at the centre of a war between man and the gods Zeus (Neeson), Hades (Fiennes) and Poseidon (a blink-and-you'll-miss-him Danny Huston). Accompanied by a handful of plucky warriors from Argos (including Mikkelsen, Cunningham, Hoult and Matheson) and his spirit-guide Io (Arterton), he heads off to find the secret to defeat Hades' feared Kraken so he can save Princess Andromeda (Davalos).

Continue reading: Clash Of The Titans Review

Picture - Pete Postlethwaite London, England, Monday 4th May 2009

Pete Postlethwaite Monday 4th May 2009 Origins Festival Of First Nations - photocall held at the Scoop, More London London, England

Pete Postlethwaite
Pete Postlethwaite
Pete Postlethwaite
Pete Postlethwaite
Pete Postlethwaite

Picture - Pete Postlethwaite London, England, Sunday 15th March 2009

Pete Postlethwaite Sunday 15th March 2009 'The Age of Stupid' UK film premiere held at Leicester Square gardens in a solar powered tent - Arrivals London, England

Pete Postlethwaite
Pete Postlethwaite
Pete Postlethwaite
Pete Postlethwaite
Pete Postlethwaite

Aeon Flux Review


OK
Music video director Anton Corbijn's video clip for industrial dance band Front 242's "Headhunter" featured a topless woman in a surreal black outfit holding a giant egg and wandering around a desolate industrial park. It's a music video that is absurdly artificial and at the same time engagingly artful.

Aeon Flux, Girlfight director Karyn Kusama's second film, is like a 95-minute remake of that video. It's visually sumptuous for no other reason than to indulge arty gluttons. And that's fine by me. I dig it, arty glutton that I am. Based on the animated short films of Peter Chung, the movie succeeds in translating Chung's fluid and sparse design. While it would be impossible to have an actress bend and slide like the heroine in the original MTV animated series, Charlize Theron is suitably acrobatic and looks great in spandex and black leather. The costumes are futuristic and the landscapes, mostly CGI, are eerily organic takes on mid-century design.

Continue reading: Aeon Flux Review

The Omen (2006) Review


Good
My favorite character in John Moore's remake of The Omen is the Pope. I am not entirely sure which Pope it is, and it is more of a cameo role really, but every time the pontiff graced the screen, I knew why I liked this film so much. He first features in a brief conference scene. His cardinals (I presume) are concerned that a recent meteor shower is the final sign of the birth of the Anti-Christ, as predicted by the book of Revelations. These concerns are presented to the Pope in a multimedia display, with numerous screens airing a student film depicting scenes from the destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia to September 11. In his second appearance, after hearing some disturbing news, the Pope drops his glass of red on the floor, while still in bed. I have never been to Vatican City, but I doubt this is how things go down. Yet, the film's disconnectedness from the laws of reality, personified here by its treatment of the leader of the Catholic Church, got me. Richard Donner's original Omen was a pig in a cocktail dress, a silly story treated with undeserving earnestness. Here, John Moore tells it like it should be told.Turns out the cardinals were on to something and the Anti-Christ is born. The unfortunate Anti-Joseph and Anti-Mary are Robert and Katherine Thorn (Liev Schreiber and Julia Stiles), the deputy to the U.S. ambassador to Italy and his young wife. When Katherine gives birth to a boy who dies just outside the hospital room, Robert accepts the offer of a priest at the hospital, taking in the child's place a baby boy whose mother died during labor and letting Katherine believe it is theirs. They name him Damien (cue choirs). After a bizarre explosion (so massive in scale it proves the devil doesn't pay for petrol) in which the U.S. ambassador dies, Robert takes the position and a promotion to the U.K. The family lives in British manor house bliss until, at a very public birthday for Damien (Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick), his nanny hangs herself, shrieking, "It's all for you!" From that moment forward the dangers of raising the Anti-Christ begin to become obvious. The black dogs begin to bark, monkeys screech, priests prophesize and a very un-Doubtfire-like nanny, Mrs Baylock (Mia Farrow), shows up to keep an eye on things.Moore doesn't stray widely from the path of the original's narrative and most changes made are welcome. I liked seeing a bit of determination in Damien's face. I liked that Katherine was young and seemed to be suffering post-partum depression. A lot of the dialogue is admittedly laughable, and Pete Postlethwaite and Michael Gambon as over-caffeinated priests add to a sense of the ludicrous. However, this only compounds its The Omen's minor brilliance. Everything is overdone: Damien sleeps on red silk sheets; people at the party start running and knocking over tables when the nanny kills herself; an interview with an old crippled man is conducted outside in the snow. The horror scenes are equally flamboyant; Marco Beltrami's score may lack the original's Latinized theme, but it kicks in to stunning and loud effect practically every time the lights go out.Schreiber is good as the politician and after a shaky start Stiles communicates her anguish very well. But it is Farrow (next to the Pope, of course) who steals the show. Her Mary Poppins performance oozes subtle menace in every sweet grin and glittery eye. When she unleashes eventually, it provides for the film's most exciting sequence - if you have dreamed for the day Rosemary would take on the Manchurian Candidate, dream no more. Though some critics might begrudge the film its directness, its loudness, perhaps its lack of class or cinematic restraint, I reveled in it. The story of Damien has always seemed a little stupid to me, and here Moore has matched the story with its telling. The result is fun, in a scary/jokey kind of way. I am not sure if John Moore is in on the joke he's telling in his remake of The Omen, but he tells it very well.If only she could do one pull-up.

Aeon Flux Review


OK
Music video director Anton Corbijn's video clip for industrial dance band Front 242's "Headhunter" featured a topless woman in a surreal black outfit holding a giant egg and wandering around a desolate industrial park. It's a music video that is absurdly artificial and at the same time engagingly artful.

Aeon Flux, Girlfight director Karyn Kusama's second film, is like a 95-minute remake of that video. It's visually sumptuous for no other reason than to indulge arty gluttons. And that's fine by me. I dig it, arty glutton that I am. Based on the animated short films of Peter Chung, the movie succeeds in translating Chung's fluid and sparse design. While it would be impossible to have an actress bend and slide like the heroine in the original MTV animated series, Charlize Theron is suitably acrobatic and looks great in spandex and black leather. The costumes are futuristic and the landscapes, mostly CGI, are eerily organic takes on mid-century design.

Continue reading: Aeon Flux Review

Between Strangers Review


Good
Between Strangers? Hmmm, sounds like a softcore porn movie. Turns out it's a weepy melodrama starring a generation-bounding collection of movie stars.

Ever since Short Cuts won accolades, we get a yearly version of this movie, a sometimes thoughtful collection of stories, none large enough to stand alone as a feature film, some to slight to merit any attention at all. Between Strangers mitigates this problem by focusing on the stories of three women, all wrestling with past mistakes or old regrets.

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James and the Giant Peach Review


Good
Lemme tell ya, this was the most unusual screening I've been to in a long time. After all, what better way to spend a Saturday morning than with 200 hyperactive children, all of whom are fawning over a guy dressed up in a giant, fuzzy, grey bat suit, complete with six-foot wingspan? (Note: as far as I can tell, the bat had nothing to do with the film.) And lemme tell ya, none of this was as strange as the film I was about to see....

Now I'm probably the last person in the world who ought to judge what makes for a good children's movie, but if you'd asked me that yesterday, I certainly wouldn't have said James and the Giant Peach. This is a story about a young boy, James (Paul Terry), whose parents are eaten by a spiritual rhinoceros. He is adopted by his cruel aunts (Miriam Margolyes and AbFab's Joanna Lumley), who abuse him cruelly. Then an "old man" (Pete Postlethwaite) gives James some "alligator tongues" which he spills on a peach tree, creating the aforementioned giant peach. Inside this peach, where James hides to get away from his aunties, he finds a bunch of giant bugs: a Brooklyn centipede (Richard Dreyfuss), a cowardly earthworm (which is, by the way, not a bug--David Thewlis), a sultry spider (Susan Sarandon), a matronly ladybug (Jane Leeves), and sundry other insects.

Continue reading: James and the Giant Peach Review

The Shipping News Review


Weak
Kevin Spacey is the Spock of serious actors. He's dependable, methodical, passionless, a huge fan of saying everything by saying nothing at all. He tends to gravitate towards characters hiding some sort of fiery secret pain by denying themselves exterior displays of emotion or excitement. In certain films, this really works, thus earning Spacey a reputation as on of Hollywood's best working actors. In The Shipping News however, it bombs badly.

It's not really Spacey's fault, it's just the script. Spacey is Quoyle, a newly single father, after his slutty whore of a wife (Cate Blanchett) is killed while selling their daughter on the black market to earn spending cash for her latest biker boyfriend. Quoyle spends his time grieving and in denial and soon decides to follow a long lost aunt to the homeland of his family in Newfoundland. There, he stumbles into a job as the shipping news reporter for the local newspaper.

Continue reading: The Shipping News Review

When the Sky Falls Review


Grim
The sad tale of Irish journalist Sinead Hamilton (Joan Allen; fictionalized from the 1996 true story of Veronica Guerin) is certainly a tragic one, but don't tell me you didn't see this coming. After being brutalized and shot while on the hunt for the leaders of a local drug ring, of course they're going to rub her out. Brutally violent, there is remarkably little story wrapped around the numerous murders in the film, as Hamilton dutifully marches toward her doom.

Dragonheart Review


Weak
It's going to be a long summer, at this rate.

Trying as hard as possible to be Braveheart with a dragon (hell, look at the title!), Dragonheart is a pretty dismal affair, punctuated by a couple of good performances, a show-stealing computer-generated dragon (with a heart of gold), and a really, really hackneyed story line.

Continue reading: Dragonheart Review

Among Giants Review


Terrible
I'm not going to try and pretend I know what director Sam Miller was going for with this movie, a perversely asinine look at an off-the-books hiring of Pete Postlethwaite and crew to paint the power line towers in a rural section of England. Featuring scenes like Postlethwaite and Rachel Griffiths running around naked under the dripping water inside a silo are only one of the things that make Among Giants not only a silly attempt at filmmaking but also an utter bore.
Pete Postlethwaite

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