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Penelope Cruz - The Counselor Special Screening at the Odeon West End Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 3rd October 2013

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Penelope Cruz

Penelope Cruz - 'The Counselor' premiere held at the Odeon West End - London, Ukraine - Thursday 3rd October 2013

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Penelope Cruz - The Counsellor Special Screening held at the Odeon West End - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 3rd October 2013

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Penelope Cruz - The beautiful and multitalented actress Penelope Cruz will be modelling Lindex fashion during the spring season. We will follow the actress for three campaigns, from a party on the red carpet to relaxing in her favourite clothes and then in the last campaign wearing this summer's 'it pieces'. The garments are available to buy in store and online from 24 April. - Tuesday 16th April 2013

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Penelope Cruz

Academy Award-winning, Penelope Cruz, George Clooney and Nespresso - Academy Award-winning actress Penelope Cruz follows in the footsteps of George Clooney and fronts a new campaign for Nespresso Wednesday 31st October 2012 Featuring: Penelope Cruz

Academy Award-winning, Penelope Cruz, George Clooney and Nespresso
Academy Award-winning, Penelope Cruz, George Clooney and Nespresso

Penelope Cruz, Campari CEO Bob and Kunze-Concewitz Tuesday 13th November 2012

Penelope Cruz, Campari Ceo Bob and Kunze-concewitz
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Video - Penelope Cruz's Husband Javier Bardem Holds Car Door Open For Her As She Leaves Hotel


'Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides' star Penelope Cruz leaves a hotel in Rome and jumps straight into an awaiting car where her husband Javier Bardem is stood holding open the door for her.

Continue: Video - Penelope Cruz's Husband Javier Bardem Holds Car Door Open For Her As She Leaves Hotel

Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem - Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem Tuesday 23rd October 2012 James Bond Skyfall World Premiere after party held at the Tate modern- Arrivals

Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem
Penelope Cruz
Penelope Cruz
Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem

Penelope Cruz, Emile Hirsch and Sergio Castellitto - Adnan Haskovic, Saadet Aksoy, Penelope Cruz, Sergio Castellitto, Emile Hirsch, Margaret Mazzantini and Pietro Castellitto Thursday 13th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere arrival at Roy Thomson Hall.

Penelope Cruz, Emile Hirsch and Sergio Castellitto
Penelope Cruz and Sergio Castellitto
Penelope Cruz and Sergio Castellitto
Penelope Cruz and Sergio Castellitto
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Penelope Cruz

Penelope Cruz Thursday 13th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' photo call at TIFF Bell Lightbox

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Penelope Cruz, Emile Hirsch and Sergio Castellitto
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Penelope Cruz

Video - Penelope Cruz Rocks The Red Carpet In Lacy Get-Up - Screening Of 'To Rome With Love At The Paris Theatre Arrivals - Part 2


The glamorous stars arrive at the Paris Theatre, NewYork for the screening of 'To Rome With Love' included BAFTA award winning Penelope Cruz and Italian actress Alessandra Mastronardi. Cruz wears a stunning, dark purple, off-the-shoulder dress with a spangled lace overlay and sleeves whilst Mastronardi opts for a simpler, strapless, black number with a long skirt and modest high heels.

Cruz's lush lace was a huge hit with the press; The Sun called it a 'head-turning look' whilst Entertainmentwise.com said she 'looked beyond elegant in the demure number'

Penelope Cruz Thursday 21st June 2012 The Cinema Society With The Hollywood Reporter & Piaget and Disaronno screening of 'To Rome With Love at the Paris Theatre - Arrivals

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Penelope Cruz Wednesday 20th June 2012 The Cinema Society With The Hollywood Reporter & Piaget and Disaronno screening of 'To Rome With Love at the Paris Theatre

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Penelope Cruz Thursday 14th June 2012

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Penelope Cruz, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards Sunday 26th February 2012 84th Annual Academy Awards (Oscars) held at the Kodak Theatre - Arrivals

Penelope Cruz, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards
Penelope Cruz, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards

Penelope Cruz and BAFTA Sunday 12th February 2012 Orange British Academy Film Awards (BAFTAs) held at the Royal Opera House - Arrivals

Penelope Cruz and Bafta
Penelope Cruz and Bafta

Guest, Penelope Cruz and BAFTA Sunday 12th February 2012 Orange British Academy Film Awards (BAFTAs) held at the Royal Opera House - Arrivals

Guest, Penelope Cruz and Bafta
Guest, Penelope Cruz and Bafta
Penelope Cruz, Sinead Cusack and Bafta
Penelope Cruz, Sinead Cusack and Bafta
Penelope Cruz, Sinead Cusack and Bafta
Penelope Cruz, Sinead Cusack and Bafta

Penelope Cruz, Meryl Streep and BAFTA - Penelope Cruz, Sunday 12th February 2012 Orange British Academy Film Awards (BAFTAs) held at the Royal Opera House - Press Room

Penelope Cruz, Meryl Streep and Bafta
Penelope Cruz, Jean Dujardin and Bafta
Penelope Cruz, Jean Dujardin and Bafta
Penelope Cruz, Martin Scorsese and Bafta

Penelope Cruz Wednesday 18th January 2012 out shopping in Bond Street in central London

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Penelope Cruz Tuesday 17th January 2012 leaving her Central London hotel

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Video - Penelope Cruz Dances In A Puddle In Rome


Spanish actress Penelope Cruz (Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides; Volver; Vicki Cristina Barcelona) is seen on the set of Italian movie Venuto Al Mondo in Rome, Italy. The actress is seen talking to crew members with a script in her hand before filming a scene with her co star Emile Hirsch, which included dancing in a puddle.

Penelope can next be seen in the upcoming Woody Allen comedy Nero Fiddled, alongside Ellen Page; Jesse Eisenberg and Danny Baldwin. The film will be released in 2012

Penelope Cruz appears on the June 2011 cover of Vogue magazine USA

Penelope Cruz

Penelope Cruz, Interview


Interview with Penelope Cruz for Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides 17 May 2011

After winning an Oscar for Vicky Christina Barcelona, no one expected Penelope Cruz to dive into an action comedy, but that's just what she did. She stars in Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides as Angelica, daughter of Blackbeard and long-time foil for Captain Jack Sparrow. The film also reunites her with Nine director Rob Marshall.

Continue reading: Penelope Cruz, Interview

Penelope Cruz Saturday 14th May 2011 2011 Cannes International Film Festival - Day 4 - Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides - Premiere Cannes, France

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Johnny Depp and Penelope Cruz
Penelope Cruz
Johnny Depp and Penelope Cruz
Johnny Depp and Penelope Cruz
Penelope Cruz

Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides Trailer


The trailer for the fourth instalment from The Pirates Of The Caribbean franchise has arrived! Captain Jack Sparrow once again takes to the high seas in an adventure that's sure to be immensely entertaining. When a beautiful yet deadly woman from Jack's past appears once again, he's unsure of her intentions but once she forces him to join her on the ruthless Blackbeard's ship called Queen Anne's Revenge asking to find the infamous fountain of youth, he knows there's sure to be plenty of danger ahead. Not only that but the captain also finds himself in the much colder climates than he's used to when his quest takes him to London.

Continue: Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides Trailer

Sex And The City 2 Trailer


Despite the everyday trials and tribulations of growing old, motherhood and balancing fulltime careers; Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte and Miranda are still friends and absolutely fabulous. Well not that fabulous, Miranda and Charlotte find coping with motherhood a bit of an uphill struggle. Carrie's relationship with Mr Big is going well but they aren't quite as close to having a family as Carrie wants, and Samantha? Well, she's just Samantha. The girls decide it's time for a holiday together, Abu Dhabi will be the location, it's just the break the girls need.

Continue: Sex And The City 2 Trailer

Nine Review


Very Good
Based on Federico Fellini's 1963 classic 8 1/2, this musical has a nicely introspective tone as it follows a filmmaker struggling to move forward in his career after a few flops. The music isn't hugely memorable, but the characters are vivid.

Guido Contini (Day-Lewis) is a star director gearing up for his ninth movie.

The press is begging for details, and his producer (Tognazzi) wants to see the script. But with shooting starting in 10 days, Guido has yet to write a word.

Continue reading: Nine Review

Broken Embraces Trailer


Watch the trailer for Broken Embraces

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Broken Embraces [los Abrazos Rotos] Review


Excellent
Perhaps not as dazzling as Almodovar's masterpieces, this film is still an involving and sleekly well-made melodrama touching on his usual themes of romance, death and parentage. It also has some terrific noir touches as it dips into ambition and revenge.

Mateo (Homar) is a filmmaker who, after going blind, has locked himself in his Madrid flat writing scripts with Diego (Novas), son of his loyal agent (Portillo). Then he hears of the death of wealthy financier Ernesto (Gomez), who 14 years earlier had bankrolled a film project starring his trophy mistress Lena (Cruz), who was desperate to get out of the relationship. Back then, as Lena and Mateo started spending rather too much time together, Ernesto sent his teen son (Ochandiano) to follow them, ostensibly to film a making-of doc.

Continue reading: Broken Embraces [los Abrazos Rotos] Review

G-Force Trailer


Watch the trailer for G-Force

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G-Force Review


Very Good
This rollicking action romp has all of the chase scenes and car crashes you expect from a Jerry Bruckheimer movie, but a lot more (intentional) laughs thanks to a witty script and a cast of engaging rodents.

Ben and Marcie (Galifianakis and Garner) are horrified when a new FBI manager (Arnett) decides to shut down their project: training rodents and insects to be super spies. But these tiny agents refuse to go quietly, especially as they've just launched a mission to stop a kitchen appliance maker (Nighy) from taking over the world. After being shipped off to a pet store, three guinea pigs Darwin, Juarez and Blaster (voiced by Rockwell, Cruz and Morgan) and their tech-expert mole Speckles (Cage) plot their escape with pet guinea pig Hurley (Favreau).

Continue reading: G-Force Review

Elegy Review


OK
Not every book is meant to be adapted into a movie. Come to think of it, not every author is meant for celluloid success. Philip Roth has won pretty much every major book prize, save for the Nobel, and he's overdue for that. His books masterfully examine the fragile side of the middle-aged male ego, and how sex and family and desire eat away at men's souls. With Updike, Mailer, and Bellow gone, Roth is the messiah of American literature.

There's just one problem: Books like his make crappy movies. Roth said as much to GQ's Andrew Corsello, adding that he hasn't been pleased with any of the adaptations, especially The Human Stain. Roth's take: "Awful! And the same people have American Pastoral."

Continue reading: Elegy Review

Vicky Cristina Barcelona Review


Good
Woody Allen's Vicky Cristina Barcelona, the venerable director's fourth consecutive film made outside of the U.S. (and more importantly, outside of New York City), is made up of scenes featuring well-spoken, awkwardly-placed rich people drinking wine, eating excellent Spanish cuisine, and visiting beautifully-aged sets that range from odd museums to classic villas to an amusement park that looks too gorgeous to run electricity through. As if one needed more reason to love Barcelona, it now turns out they have a Tilt-A-Whirl.

When previously in London, Allen used all sharp tones, imagery wise. Even the shopfronts had perfect diction. At first, this yielded excellent results (Match Point) and the stage was set for a resurrection of the eternal Kvetch. Allen's two follow-ups, Scoop and Cassandra's Dream, debunked those hopes, proving that very same sharpness can lead to the visually mundane. In Spain, however, everything already has a built-in romance to it. The old-style Spanish houses, the Gaudi architecture, the auditory splendor of Spanish guitar playing: You're supposed to swoon on cue and you do.

Continue reading: Vicky Cristina Barcelona Review

The Good Night Review


OK
T.S. Eliot has remarked, "Human kind cannot bear very much reality." And who would dare to contradict him? Reality is a nasty, horrible mess. But a rash of new films offer a variety of nostrums for escape from the Real World. Wristcutters: A Love Story offers the easiest way out but other films prefer to seek an unsteady balance between reality and oblivion -- whether it be warbling away your miserable home life (Romance & Cigarettes), erasing your troublesome memories (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind) or, in the case of Jake Paltrow's entertaining but slight debut film as director/writer, The Good Night, increasing your dream life at the expense of your depressingly mediocre and despairing waking reality.

In The Good Night, Martin Freeman, in an interesting amalgam of Tim from The Office and the Arthur Dent of A Hitchhiker's Guide To the Galaxy, plays Gary, an ex-rock musician, now toiling away in a dead-end job at a commercial jingle firm, working for his former bandmate Paul (Simon Pegg). One of Gary's problems is that he knows he is wallowing in banality but can do nothing about it; his boss exhorts him to "make it bad."

Continue reading: The Good Night Review

All About My Mother Review


Very Good
Director Pedro Almodovar explains the relationship between tunnels and the main character of Manuela (Cecila Roth) in All About My Mother with the line: "Manuela runs away. She always runs away on a train, through endless tunnels."

Indeed, Manuela is always moving. With the untimely death of her son, Estoban, she moves to Barcelona to embark upon a search for Estoban's father. In Barcelona, she is constantly moving from one place to another, doing something or another for someone. Save a transsexual prostitute (Antonio San Juan) here, help a pregnant nun (Penelope Cruz) there. Help smooth out the turbulent lesbian relationship between two actresses (Marisa Paredes and Candela Pena) here, usher an older woman (Rosa Maria Sarda) into a great understanding of life there. She never stops.

Continue reading: All About My Mother Review

Live Flesh Review


Very Good
Witness the increasing promise of Pedro Almodóvar, in a film that has gone largely unnoticed in his career but stands as a worthy and mostly mainstream entry into his unique style of twisted relationship movies. Live Flesh is uncommonly convoluted as a setup -- involving a love triangle between a cop that was shot and paralyzed, the man who shot him, and a girl -- but pretty straightforward in the delivery. Some of the erotic imagery is unforgettable. The film itself is less so, but still a worthwhile experience.

Continue reading: Live Flesh Review

Volver Review


Excellent
Pedro Almodóvar's Volver is a witty and woozy paean to the off-kilter wonder that is Spanish womanhood. Again. At this stage in his career, one isn't expecting too much else from Almodóvar than further explorations of the semi-camp, lightly magical territory that he has staked out as his own for close to three decades now; but that doesn't mean he can't still astonish. Unlike Woody Allen, who also works within a similarly rich but limited set of constraints, Almodóvar manages to make each film seem like an entirely new creation.

Volver starts with a wonderfully lyrical scene in which the old women of a rural village clean the headstones in a graveyard during a fantastic windstorm -- the blowing leaves quickly render absurd any cleaning. The village is a slightly unreal place anyway, populated mostly by the very old (in actuality, a common occurrence in Spain) and known far and wide for the wind, which is reputed to drive the inhabitants insane. The stars are a pair of sisters, Raimunda (Penélope Cruz) and Sole (Lole Dueñas) who long ago decamped for Madrid, much like Almodóvar himself did as a child (he shot the village scenes in his hometown of La Mancha). The sisters' parents died in a fire years back, but they return on occasion to check in on their elderly aunt, Paula (Chus Lampreave, who has mellowed here somewhat since her hilariously venomous turn in Almodóvar's 1995 film The Flower of My Secret). They still feel that tenuous link to their ancestral village, but with their parents dead and unfulfilling lives in the city, the two seem stuck in a hazy netherworld, home in neither place.

Continue reading: Volver Review

Noel Review


Weak
Susan Sarandon starring in your movie ought to guarantee a box office bonanza, no? Well, not always. This terribly ill-advised film (which got only the barest of theatrical releases) is a textbook example of just about everything that guarantees disaster. That includes putting Robin Williams in a non-comedic role, giving Penélope Cruz too much dialogue, having Alan Arkin believe that Paul Walker is his reincarnated wife, and, worst of all, setting your Christmas movie among the horrors of an urban hospital.

The idea here is that our central characters (including all of the above, plus one guy who breaks his own hand so he can relive his Best Christmas Ever as he did as a kid in the E.R.) have problems. You know, New Yorker problems: Walker is a jealous cop (and Cruz is his flirtatious girlfriend), and Sarandon's geriatric mother is an a sort of dazed funk -- just staring at the walls, refusing to eat. Sarandon is the centerpiece of the film: She's a mopey creature who's faced endless disaster in her life (a stillborn baby, even), but she's trying to keep up appearances.

Continue reading: Noel Review

All The Pretty Horses Review


Weak
All the Pretty Horses reminds me of a bad comedian telling a joke. He begins with an awful set-up and takes forever introducing the characters. If you're lucky, he stumbles into the narrative within five minutes. By the time he's arrived at the punch line, you don't care. You've forgotten the setup altogether.

Billy Bob Thornton's latest film, which examines a Texas cowboy trying to find his dreams in 1949 Mexico, is a tale I might have been interested in. But like that lousy comedian, Thornton's delivery positively stinks. And, what's worse, I couldn't find the punch line anywhere.

Continue reading: All The Pretty Horses Review

Don't Move Review


Terrible
In the pantheon of ludicrous, offensive, and idiotic dramatic ideas, few can rival the narrative axis of Sergio Castellitto's Don't Move, in which heart-stopping romance and chest-heaving passion spring from deliberate, violent rape. Preposterous whenever it's not embarrassingly mawkish and manipulative, this Italian import concerns Timoteo (Castellitto), an unhappily married surgeon, and the budding affair he begins with filthy, impoverished cocktail waitress Italia (Penélope Cruz) after he - believe it or not - repeatedly sexually assaults her over the course of a few weeks. Yet love blossoms from such brutality because, as Castellitto's film would somehow have us believe, Timoteo's crime - not exactly romanticized, but nonetheless presented with something less than condemnation - is just a cry for help, a cathartic expulsion of the anger and anguish created by his loveless life. Thus, when he physically forces himself upon the innocent Italia (her name simply one of many instances of unsubtle symbolism), he's not a cretinous predator to be loathed or vilified but, rather, a pitiful man trying to find himself.

Turned off yet? If not, then Castellitto's wealth of ostentatious slow-motion shots, employment of cheesy pop songs, and disgusting, exploitive use of a critically wounded young girl for his film's framing story, will undoubtedly do the trick. Adapted from Margaret Mazzantini's novel, Don't Move layers on cheap sentiment and shamelessly calculating plot twists without even a sidewise glance toward rationality. Timoteo's teenage daughter suffers serious head trauma in a motorcycle accident, and while waiting to hear word of her grave condition, Timoteo spies a mysterious figure on the hospital promenade who conjures memories of his beloved Italia, whom he not only loved and planned to run away with (wife and brand new baby be damned), but whom he credits for having healed his tortured soul. As embodied by Castellitto, Timoteo is the kind of misery-relishing sad-sack who enjoys prolonged, empty stares into nothingness, and his behavior is so ridiculous - including one screamingly silly moment when he writes "I Raped A Woman" in the sand while his wife ignorantly saunters by - that it's hard to envisage him as anything less than an absurdly overblown fictional creation. Watching him act forlornly in a dreary bar (in slow-motion, naturally) while Europe's "The Final Countdown" blares from the jukebox is to witness the eye-rolling height of bizarre unintentional comedy.

Continue reading: Don't Move Review

Woman On Top Review


Weak
Once in a very great while a motion picture comes along to captivate the minds and spirits of audiences everywhere, magically suspending disbelief in all who witness it. And, though it tries earnestly, Woman on Top is not that picture.

I love movies. In particular, I hunger for films that invite me into a world beyond the limits of mundane, material, daily existence. While Woman on Top deserves some credit for its fresh, innocent effort to make this invitation, it is disappointingly infantile once we all get to the party.

Continue reading: Woman On Top Review

Don Juan Review


Weak
The story of Don Juan has been made into some bizarre and unique films before, but this 1998 French rendition is one of the least compelling I've seen.

The problems begin with the casting, with actor Jacques Weber taking the starring role. (Weber, a long-time French actor, also wrote the script and directed -- so maybe it's not so much a casting problem as it is an ego problem.) Weber is about as far from Don Juan as I can imagine, and he comes across as an overgrown, geriatric, hairy monster of sorts. Why would a beauty like Emmanuelle Béart be distraught when Juan packs up and leaves town for greener pastures? Hell if I know.

Continue reading: Don Juan Review

Live Flesh Review


Very Good
Witness the increasing promise of Pedro Almodóvar, in a film that has gone largely unnoticed in his career but stands as a worthy and mostly mainstream entry into his unique style of twisted relationship movies. Live Flesh is uncommonly convoluted as a setup -- involving a love triangle between a cop that was shot and paralyzed, the man who shot him, and a girl -- but pretty straightforward in the delivery. Some of the erotic imagery is unforgettable. The film itself is less so, but still a worthwhile experience.

Continue reading: Live Flesh Review

Don't Tempt Me Review


OK
Fairly ridiculous but often fun, this supernatural satire has Victoria Abril and Penélope Cruz as angels on opposite sides of the war between good and evil. (Abril's an angel for heaven, where all is in black and white and everyone speaks French; Cruz is a servant of evil, where everyone speaks Spanish or English and works slinging food in a prison.

The battle plays out over the soul of a pathetic boxer named Manny (Demián Bichir), who makes next to no impression in the film. All eyes are on the leading ladies and the jaunts through heaven, hell, and earth. Whether Abril's performing in a cabaret or Abril is eating lunch in her waitstaff's uniform, this bizarre production keeps you wondering, well, what the hell is going on in this movie?

Continue reading: Don't Tempt Me Review

Open Your Eyes Review


Excellent
If Stanley Kubrick and David Lynch had collaborated on a project, the result might have been something like Open Your Eyes. Kubrick's most common themes -- imaginary worlds, sexual and social obsessions, distrust of emotion, human depravity, and a journey towards freedom and self-knowledge -- present themselves here. Lynch's usual themes -- dreams and illusion vs. reality, persuasion, fear, self-submission, murder, and curiosity -- also sprinkle themselves into this movie's stirring, complex recipe.

From the moment the movie opens, it's unclear of what is real and what is not. We meet a handsome, young, successful businessman named César (Eduardo Noriega), who drives expensive cars, resides in a classy residence, and enjoys an endless supply of beautiful women.

Continue reading: Open Your Eyes Review

Captain Corelli's Mandolin Review


Good
Captain Corelli's Mandolin is one of those films that most people can't in good conscience say they hate. In the tradition of films like Waking Ned Devine and Cinema Paradiso, it's a sweet but flawed wartime romance with enough gorgeous scenery and quaint villagers to choke a horse. It innocuously celebrates the triumph of true love, exalts the rise of an everyman hero, toasts art's ability to eclipse the horrors of life, and at times is even a visual feast (Miramax should charge the Greek tourist board royalties).

Adapted from the best-selling novel by Louis de Bernieres, the story begins in 1941. Dr. Iannis (John Hurt) and his lovely daughter Pelagia (Penélope Cruz) live on the idyllic Greek isle of Cephallonia, where Pelagia is betrothed to fisherman Mandras (Christian Bale) who's eager to prove his mettle in the growing war in Europe. He goes off to fight for Greece against the Italians; in the meantime, the Italians invade his home island. But these Italians aren't scary, Mussolini types; they're jolly, good-natured and even kind. According to them, Italians are best at "eating, singing, and making love," which the filmmakers set out to prove to no end in this movie. Let's put it this way: Puccini gets some serious screen time.

Continue reading: Captain Corelli's Mandolin Review

All About My Mother Review


Very Good
Director Pedro Almodovar explains the relationship between tunnels and the main character of Manuela (Cecila Roth) in All About My Mother with the line: "Manuela runs away. She always runs away on a train, through endless tunnels."

Indeed, Manuela is always moving. With the untimely death of her son, Estoban, she moves to Barcelona to embark upon a search for Estoban's father. In Barcelona, she is constantly moving from one place to another, doing something or another for someone. Save a transsexual prostitute (Antonio San Juan) here, help a pregnant nun (Penelope Cruz) there. Help smooth out the turbulent lesbian relationship between two actresses (Marisa Paredes and Candela Pena) here, usher an older woman (Rosa Maria Sarda) into a great understanding of life there. She never stops.

Continue reading: All About My Mother Review

The Hi-Lo Country Review


Good
Duel in the Sun meets It's a Wonderful Life -- in the oddest of ways. The Hi-Lo Country gives us Harrelson and Crudup as best friends in post-WWII New Mexico, where cowboys still rule a land forgotten by time. Over two rather dragging hours, a story of Harrelson's affair with the married Arquette unfolds, with Crudup lusting for the girl as well (not to mention while he courts Cruz), and Sam Elliott's evil cattle baron overseeing it all (and corrupting Harrelson's brother, Hauser). Got all that? Hi-Lo often ventures into the realm of the truly baffling, but it isn't without its charms, as Harrelson is quite engaging in his role.

Twice Upon A Yesterday Review


Good
Cute, yet not altogether satisfying, this Sliding Doors drama-comedy has Henshall as a British actor who gets the chance to turn back time so that he doesn't fess up to girlfriend Headey that he's cheating on her. Will things turn out any better the second time around? Only fate knows the answer to that. The premise is, again, cute and moderately well-done, but unfortunately Henshall does not have the radiance of the crowd-pleasing Gwyneth Paltrow. A fun diversion, though.

Sahara Review


OK
If "Sahara" weren't quite so dumb, it might have been a lot offun.

A tongue-in-cheek action-adventure movie loosely basedon Clive Cussler's best-selling novel, this wild ride stars Matthew McConaugheyas maritime treasure-hunter Dirk Pitt, who follows rumors about a missingCivil War ironclad halfway around the world to the North African desert.

But on his way he becomes sidetracked by a higher senseof purpose when a willful, beautiful World Health Organization doctor (PenelopeCruz) enlists his help to sneak into a war-torn country, against orders,to track the industrial-waste source of an illness spreading through localvillages.

The picture's often over-the-top action sequences havean excess of boys-with-toys spirit. Especially fun are a guns-a-blazin'chase between a speedboat and paramilitary gunboat down a picturesque desertriver, and a scene in which McConaughey and his requisite wisecrackingcool-dork sidekick Steve Zahn (who has practically cornered the marketon such roles) fashion decades-old biplane wreckage into a land-sailingcatamaran after escaping from bad guys in a remote bank of sand dunes.

Continue reading: Sahara Review

Captain Corelli's Mandolin Review


Weak

Coming off of "Shakespeare In Love," which in many ways reinvented, spoofed or at least paid winking homage to 400 years of romantic clichés, one might think director John Madden would be able to circumvent the kind of highly telegraphed heartstring-pulling that goes on in "Captain Corelli's Mandolin."

But the opening credits have barely faded before this wartime three-hanky flick plunges in with the Harlequin novel melodrama. Mandras (Christian Bale), a brave, passionate, handsome young Greek island lad promises to marry the village beauty named Pelagia (Penelope Cruz) as he goes off to fight the encroaching armies of Mussolini and Hitler. "I don't know how to tell you what's in here," he cries on one knee, pounding a fist against his breast. "But I think...I know...(choke!)...I love you! (Dramatic pause.) Now I leave for war! Come dance with me!"

If you were able to read the preceding direct quote without gagging, boy, oh boy is this your kind of movie -- a soap opera of epic proportions involving Pelagia haplessly falling for an occupying Italian soldier while her lover is off fighting for her and for her country's freedom.

Continue reading: Captain Corelli's Mandolin Review

Open Your Eyes Review


Excellent

"Open Your Eyes" is a jaw-dropping psychological thriller about the power of the human mind to bend and break reality -- or is it?

With more twists than a strand of DNA, co-writer and director Alejandro Amenabar delves headlong into the increasingly erratic mind of a rich, charming, devastatingly handsome egoist who becomes unhinged after being horribly disfigured in a car crash.

Eduardo Noriega plays Cesar, a habitual love 'em and leave 'em charmer who at his 25th birthday party meets Sofia (Penelope Cruz), his best friend's date and the first girl who has ever truly made his heart race.

Continue reading: Open Your Eyes Review

Vanilla Sky Review


OK

Imagine if someone remade "The Others," this year's most incredibly chilling haunted-house movie starring Nicole Kidman, but rewrote it to include Casper the Friendly Ghost. That should give you a pretty good idea what Cameron Crowe has done with "Vanilla Sky."

In 1997, Alejandro Amenabar -- writer and director of "The Others" -- created a stunning psychological thriller called "Open Your Eyes." It was about a rich, young lothario whose mind becomes a dangerous jumble of dreams, fantasies and delusions when he is horribly disfigured in a car crash the day after getting his first taste of real love.

Filled with ingenious twists and powerful emotions, it was a stirring brain-bender that could give you the tingles at any given moment.

Continue reading: Vanilla Sky Review

All About My Mother Review


Very Good

Once you get past the fact that this movie takes place in a very Pedro Almodovar world where soccer moms, flamboyant unemployed transvestites, aging stage divas and pregnant nuns all hang around together -- and even date each other -- "All About My Mother" emerges as the brassy Spanish director's most mature and intuitive work yet.

The story of the soccer mom's devastation and perseverance after seeing her 17-year-old son killed in a traffic accident, the film follows the distraught Manuela (Cecilia Roth) from Barcelona to Madrid in a therapeutic search for the boy's father -- now a transvestite -- who never knew he had a child.

In one of Almodovar's delicious twists of irony, as the movie begins Manuela is an organ transplant nurse, who is soon faced with the difficult decision to allow her son's body to be used for spare parts.

Continue reading: All About My Mother Review

Woman On Top Review


Bad

When a movie begins with a lot of narration, it's rarely a good sign. It almost invariably means the director's first cut of the picture was flaccid, and in order to shore it up, scenes from the beginning were diced into a montage to get the audience to the core of the story sooner.

"Woman on Top" begins with about 10 minutes of fairy-tale style narration, all about how a beautiful Brazilian girl named Isabella (talented Spanish enchantress Penelope Cruz) was cursed by the gods with extreme motion sickness, but blessed an ambrosial ability for the culinary arts.

The narrator goes on to explain how this girl grew up and met a sexy waiter (Murilo Benicio) whom she seduced with her cooking. They married and opened a restaurant together, where she quickly became frustrated because she did all the work and he got all the credit.

Continue reading: Woman On Top Review

All The Pretty Horses Review


OK

In directing "All the Pretty Horses," a romantic homage to the great American cowboy epic, Billy Bob Thornton adheres honorably to the code of the Western and emerges with a familiar and satisfying -- if not entirely memorable -- eulogy to a lifestyle that rode off into the sunset some time last century.

The film takes place in 1949 and follows a handsome young rancher, played with surprising 10-gallon-hat credibility by Matt Damon (he says "I reckon" like he means it), who clings to the cowboy way as he tries to find a new life in Mexico after losing his family's long-time homestead.

"Come to find out, Mama means to sell it," Damon narrates in a flawless Texas drawl. "Says the oil company will pay her three times what it's worth."

Continue reading: All The Pretty Horses Review

Twice Upon A Yesterday Review


Weak

Boy meets girl. Boy loses girl because he cheats on her. Girl gets engagedto another guy. Boy is miserable. Boy meets magical garbage men who sendhim back in time for a second chance.

Continue reading: Twice Upon A Yesterday Review

Penelope Cruz

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Penelope Cruz

Date of birth

28th April, 1974

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.68


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Penelope Cruz Movies

Murder on the Orient Express Movie Review

Murder on the Orient Express Movie Review

The latest adaptation of Agatha Christie's 83-year-old classic whodunit, this lavish, star-studded film is old-style...

Murder On The Orient Express Trailer

Murder On The Orient Express Trailer

It's the 1930s and a group of strangers from different walks of life board a...

Ma Ma Movie Review

Ma Ma Movie Review

From Spain, this drama grapples with some enormous issues without getting too heavy about them....

Grimsby Movie Review

Grimsby Movie Review

Although it contains some memorably outrageous comedy moments, this movie (retitled The Brothers Grimsby for...

Zoolander 2 Movie Review

Zoolander 2 Movie Review

With virtually the same blend of wit and idiocy as the 2001 original, this fashion-scene...

Zoolander 2 - Relax Trailer

Zoolander 2 - Relax Trailer

Though Derek and Hansel have left the world of fashion modelling behind them, a part...

Grimsby Trailer

Grimsby Trailer

Nobby is a good ol' northern lad who loves nothing more than spending time with...

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Zoolander 2 - Trailer Trailer

Zoolander 2 - Trailer Trailer

Derek, Hansel and some other familiar faces are back in Zoolander 2! After offering their...

Grimsby - Red Band Teaser Trailer

Grimsby - Red Band Teaser Trailer

Nobby and Sebastian are long lost brothers who live completely different lives. Sebastian is a...

Zoolander 2 - Teaser Trailer

Zoolander 2 - Teaser Trailer

After a disastrous return to the fashion industry following his retirement, which almost ended in...

Twice Born Trailer

Twice Born Trailer

When Gemma was a young student from Italy, all she wanted was excitement and adventure...

The Counselor Movie Review

The Counselor Movie Review

This film proves that all the right ingredients don't necessarily make a movie work. Even...

The Counsellor Trailer

The Counsellor Trailer

'The Counsellor' tells the story of a naive lawyer who holds the belief that dabbling...

I'm So Excited! [Los Amantes Pasajeros] Movie Review

I'm So Excited! [Los Amantes Pasajeros] Movie Review

Fans of more recent Almodovar films like The Skin I Live In or Volver should...

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