Penelope Ann Miller

Penelope Ann Miller

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'American Crime' ATAS special screening

Penelope Ann Miller - 'American Crime' ATAS special screening held at Walt Disney Studio - Arrivals at Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 8th May 2015

Benito Martinez, Richard Cabral, Penelope Ann Miller, John Ridley, Caitlin Gerard, Elvis Nolasco, Timothy Hutton and Felicity Huffman
Benito Martinez, Richard Cabral, Penelope Ann Miller, John Ridley, Caitlin Gerard, Elvis Nolasco, Timothy Hutton, Felicity Huffman and Michael MacDonald
Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller

"American Crime" Premiere Screening

Penelope Ann Miller - Shots of a number of stars as they attended the premiere screening of'American Crime' The screening was held at the Ace Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 1st March 2015

Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller

Premiere of ABC's 'American Crime'

Penelope Ann Miller - Premiere of ABC's 'American Crime' at Ace Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 28th February 2015

Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller

Disney & ABC Television Group's TCA Winter Press Tour

Penelope Ann Miller - A host of stars turned out for the Disney ABC Television Critics Aassociation Winter Press Tour which was held at the Langham Huntington Hotel in Pasadena, California, United States - Wednesday 14th January 2015

Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller

Disney ABC TCA Winter Press Tour

Penelope Ann Miller - A host of stars turned out for the Disney ABC Television Critics Aassociation Winter Press Tour which was held at the Langham Huntington Hotel in Pasadena, California, United States - Thursday 15th January 2015

Penelope Ann Miller
Penelope Ann Miller

The Artist Review


Essential
Made as a 1920s-style silent movie, this hugely enjoyable film is already a classic. And while it's far from mainstream, it's also packed with more wit, passion and invention than all of the films in any given multiplex combined.

In 1927, George (Dujardin) is Hollywood's top star, swashbuckling through adventure blockbusters with his faithful sidekick dog Uggy. At one of his premieres he meets Peppy (Bejo), a mystery girl who gets her own shot at stardom as a dancing extra in one of George's films. His grumpy wife (Miller) isn't happy about this. And there's more trouble when the studio boss (Goodman) decides to switch to talkies. So George walks out to make his own silent film, while Peppy becomes a sound-movie star. But she doesn't forget that he gave her a break.

Continue reading: The Artist Review

Chaplin Review


Good
Movies about movie stars are always a dodgy affair. They reek of in-jokes, chumminess, and a glossy version of Hollywood that has never really existed.

As actors go, Charlie Chaplin is at least a worthy candidate for a biopic. His impact on the acting profession and especially physical comedy is hard to overstate, and the man remains an icon whose face (or silhouette) embodies cinema. In the hands of Richard Attenborough, Chaplin's life is digested into the highlights -- from vaudevillian youth to his arrival in Hollywood to his amazingly fast rise to fame. Attenborough even dabbles in Chaplin's investigation by J. Edgar Hoover's FBI. Naturally, the running series of Chaplin's famous romantic entanglements are carefully tallied, the actresses playing the various Mrs. Chaplins (and near misses) making up a who's who of early-'90s starlets.

Continue reading: Chaplin Review

Blonde Ambition Review


Unbearable
Earlier this year, Blonde Ambition made record-breaking headlines. Not for anything good, mind you, but for its opening day box office. One source said the movie logged a whopping 48 paying customers on Friday, earning the film $350 total. By the time the movie was out of theaters altogether, it had made less than $7,000.

Blonde Ambition, alas, ultimately earned substantially more than it deserved. As a star vehicle for Jessica Simpson, produced by her dad (with the aid of seven other producers), it's a rolling disaster from start to finish.

Continue reading: Blonde Ambition Review

The Messengers Review


Terrible
While the marketing may seem enticing, The Messengers is nothing more than a run-of-the-mill haunted house movie, and a poorly made one at that. Columbia/Screen Gems would have you believe it's all about gifted children with supernatural visions (a la The Sixth Sense), but this slow-mover is aimed squarely at teens that get their chills from the Grudge movies -- American or Japanese, either will do.

A murdered family sadly haunts the home in which they met their demise, wreaking havoc on the life and mental state of a teenage girl, as she and her baby brother are the only ones that can see these not-so-grisly apparitions. Why can't their parents (Dylan McDermott and Penelope Ann Miller) catch a glimpse? That's not explained -- if it were, there might have been more meat on these bare bones.

Continue reading: The Messengers Review

The Break Up (1998) Review


Unbearable
Pedestrian thriller. Nonsensical and obvious why it went straight to cable, despite a decent cast of stars. What's with Weber's big moustache, anyway?

Carlito's Way Review


Extraordinary
Spitting in the face of the idea that criminals are simply nurtured by their environments, legendary gangster Carlito Brigante (Al Pacino, doing a vague approximation of a Puerto Rican accent) stands before a judge in the 1993 Brian De Palma film Carlito's Way and refuses to blame his criminal ways on his upbringing or the fact that his mother died when he was young: "The fact is, your honor, I was a mean little bastard when she was alive."

It's a rebuke to the environment-nurtures-criminals mentality that infused the previous De Palma/Pacino collaboration from 10 years earlier, Scarface, which stands as the bloody and exciting but frankly pretty immature younger brother to the more stately and ultimately more affecting Carlito's Way. The differences are obvious right from the film's opening gunshot: Carlito's been popped and is being wheeled away to the hospital, musing as he dies, "Don't take me to no hospital... Some bitch always pops you at midnight when all they got is a Chinese intern with a wooden spoon." The rest of the film is in flashback, starting with Carlito being let out of jail after serving only five years of a 30-year-sentence and leading back up to that gunshot.

Continue reading: Carlito's Way Review

Outside Ozona Review


OK
What happens on those lonely west Texas roads in the dead of night? All sorts of derring-do, as it turns out! Outside Ozona is surprisingly lively fare despite its B-movie aspirations, telling a tale of intersecting lives-on-the-highway. The characters include a warm-hearted trucker, a Navaho woman taking her grandmother to see the Gulf, a white-trash couple making a new start, and a pair of bickering sisters en route cross-country. Oh, and a serial killer. Not terribly entertaining, but moderately fun to watch.

Along For The Ride Review


Unbearable
Phew! This was originally a First on Starz! Movie under the even-worse title of Forever Lulu. It wasn't any good then, and it certainly isn't any better now that you have to pay $3.50 for the privilege of a two-night rental.

The story is utterly moronic -- Patrick Swayze and Melanie Griffith play old flames. In keeping with all of Melanie Griffith's oeuvre, she's a bit crazy, of course. In fact, she's certified schizophrenic, which makes her insistence that she and the Swayzak track down their long lost illegitimate child all the more harrowing. And Penelope Ann Miller, playing a psychotherapist and Swayze's character's wife, figures that her husband will get so hot and bothered by the Griffith and her wanton ways that she needs to chase after them. And of course, Miller turns out to be no more stable than Griffith.

Continue reading: Along For The Ride Review

Chapter Zero Review


Weak
Adam Lazarus's life is so sad -- gasp! -- that his first novel was rejected by one publisher! Can you believe it!? He's so despondent he throws the manuscript away along with his computer.

Putting aside the absurdity of the scenario that a writer would abandon his craft based on a single rejection for his first major work, Chapter Zero ultimately reveals itself as a pleasant enough -- though ultimately trivial -- little comedy.

Continue reading: Chapter Zero Review

The Break Up Review


Unbearable
Pedestrian thriller. Nonsensical and obvious why it went straight to cable, despite a decent cast of stars. What's with Weber's big moustache, anyway?
Penelope Ann Miller

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