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Hustlers Trailer


The pawn shop is the last resort for most broke people; the place where the impoverished and the desperate sell off their most prized valuables in exchange for an obscenely disproportionate amount of money. In 'Hustlers', it's where three dramatic stories begin; first, a pair of newlyweds find themselves in the shop where, as fate would have it, the groom finds the ring of his first wife who has been missing for some time. While he decides to seek out her kidnapper, a pair of small time criminals are concocting a plan to rob their meth dealer - though their armed robbery plan is inhibited when one of them pawns his shotgun. Meanwhile, one serious-minded Elvis Presley impersonator wishes to pawn his alleged gold Elvis memorabilia as he moves into the town hoping to land a new job in a fairground.

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US - Ireland Alliance honor Actor Colin Farrell

Michael R. Burns and Pell James - US - Ireland Alliance honor Actor Colin Farrell - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Thursday 21st February 2013

Pell James and Michael R. Burns

The Lincoln Lawyer Trailer


Mickey Haller might not be one of the top lawyers in LA but the service he provides for his clients is an effective one. Generally Mickey defends bike gangs, prostitutes and drug dealers but when he learns of a case that might just give him a huge break, it's something he can't turn down.

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Shrink Review


Good
Blackly funny but never as vicious as it clearly wants to be, this rather nihilistic look at modern society keeps us hooked with desperate and lost characters who all have a whiff of soulful humanity.

Henry Carter (Spacey) is a celebrity psychiatrist unable to rebound after a terrible personal tragedy. Anaesthetising himself with alcohol and drugs, he wonders if the fact that he can't help himself indicates that he's useless to his patients too. He's also annoyed that his family keeps trying to help him, from an intervention to a pro bono assignment to treat a troubled teen (Palmer), who has had a similar experience. The fact is that he just has patients, not friends, and the only person he can talk to is his dealer (Plemons).

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Picture - Pell James Los Angeles, California, Monday 15th June 2009

Pell James Monday 15th June 2009 Los Angeles premiere of 'Surveillance' held at the Landmark Theater Los Angeles, California

Pell James
Pell James

Picture - Pell James and Bill Pullman Los Angeles, California, Monday 15th June 2009

Pell James and Bill Pullman - Pell James and Bill Pullman Los Angeles, California - Los Angeles premiere of 'Surveillance' held at the Landmark Theater Monday 15th June 2009

Picture - Robert Loggia, Pell James and... Los Angeles, California, Monday 15th June 2009

Robert Loggia, Pell James and Bill Pullman - Robert Loggia, Pell James and Bill Pullman Los Angeles, California - Los Angeles premiere of 'Surveillance' held at the Landmark Theater Monday 15th June 2009

The King Review


Good
The creepy prodigal son tale The King takes a young sailor (just out of the navy) named Elvis, sends him to find his father, a born-again preacher who never married Elvis' mom (a whore), then falls in love with the preacher's teenage daughter (his half-sister), and somehow never descends into sheer idiocy. This may be pulp material, but the telling is first-rate.Elvis is played by Gael Garcia Bernal, who, in his second English-language role, absolutely walks away with the film. His Elvis is an intriguing blank from the get-go, striding off his ship and back into the world with just a small bag of clothes and a his M1 rifle (how he was able to smuggle this out of the military so easily is never quite clear). In a sharply-edited opening sequence - first-time feature director James Marsh has a tight hold on his material - Elvis heads to his childhood home of Corpus Christi, visits a hooker, buys a car, checks into a motel, and finds his father, all with the same determined yet casual expression on his face; just checking things off his list. His father, David Sandow (William Hurt, managing not to overact for once, even with the bad facial hair and deep Texas accent) is a preacher at a small church where his teenage son plays uptempo Christian rock songs and service times are announced outside on a garish red LED display. When Elvis finally confronts his estranged father, Sandow acknowledges that that was a different time in his life and tells Elvis in no uncertain terms to stay the hell away from his family.Elvis is nothing, however, if not determined. He starts shadowing the Sandows, quickly befriending, and then seducing, their 16-year-old daughter Malerie (a sunny Pell James). The fact that this is his half-sister doesn't seem to bother Elvis one bit. He's content to work his pizza delivery job, assist Malerie in some good old-fashioned pastor's daughter rebellion, and worm his way ever closer into their lives. It's easy to see how Malerie falls for Elvis. Bernal's insistently cheery and earnest demeanor would, when used to full effect, melt the iciest of hearts. It's a sublimely subtle performance, likeable to the extreme, yet showing a flicker of sociopathy every now and again to keep everything unhinged just enough.Marsh co-wrote the elegant script with Milo Addica, a co-writer on Monster's Ball, a film which shares with this one a red-state setting and certain bloody sense of fate. They aren't afraid to upturn audience expectations on a dime and to plummet very quickly into surprisingly dark places. It's a gorgeously shot film, with some of the outdoor scenes shared by Malerie and Elvis holding a sun-soaked youthful beauty that recalls Badlands. Like Malick, the filmmakers are digging at the malevolence behind the beauty, a malevolence that they unleash later on with a disturbingly calm fury.This is not to say that The King doesn't occasionally take things too far. The stabs at black humor are mostly mistimed and the film almost blows it completely by laying on the Biblical overtones with a trowel. It's not a story easily shaken, however, or easily pigeonholed, inhabiting instead a bright and evil category all its own.King and queen.

Undiscovered Review


Terrible
Watch enough movies and after a while you learn a few things. Here's one important lesson: When the number of ushers assigned to a theater showing a movie is greater than the number of people actually watching the movie, you're in trouble. For Undiscovered, the final count during this reviewer's public screening: Ushers 3; Audience Members 1.

This underwhelming romantic drama set against the backdrop of L.A.'s rock music scene doesn't break that rule. Oddly enough, what dooms the movie is its strict adherence to two overused story tactics, "a star is made; a star is destroyed" and "the missed opportunity" romance. Predictably, the results are not pleasant and ushers nationwide will have an easy time cleaning gum and cola off the floors.

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Undiscovered Review


Unbearable

He's a sexy young struggling musician who never has to struggle. She's an aimless young model who wants to be an actress but never goes on auditions. Apparently, they're meant for each other, but just too stupid, young and shallow to let it happen without a lot of soap-operatic fuss.

So can somebody please tell me why we're supposed to care about these one-dimensional MTV-spawned caricatures in "Undiscovered"? Writer John Galt and director Meiert Avis sure haven't offered any clues.

Hunky, pouty Luke (Steven Strait, "Sky High") and boney, peppy Brier (Pell James) dance around each other through the whole picture, but he's busy trolling around with vapid models as his star rises during pedestrian music-video montage sequences, and she refuses to date any more musicians, having been recently suckered by a transparently scummy British rock star from Central Casting.

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