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The Art Of Elysium And Samsung Galaxy Present Marina Abramovic's HEAVEN - Red Carpet

Paz de la Huerta - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived for the Art of Elysium's 8th Annual Heaven Gala held which was held at Hangar 8 in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 11th January 2015

Paz de la Huerta and Guest
Paz de la Huerta
Paz de la Huerta
Paz de la Huerta

The Art of Elysium's 8th Annual Heaven Gala

Paz de la Huerta and Guest - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived for the Art of Elysium's 8th Annual Heaven Gala held which was held at Hangar 8 in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 10th January 2015

Paz de la Huerta
Paz de la Huerta
Paz de la Huerta
Paz de la Huerta
Paz de la Huerta

Decades: Les Must De Moschino Event

Paz de la Huerta - Decades: Les Must De Moschino Event - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 21st March 2014

Paz de la Huerta
Cameron Silver and Paz de la Huerta
Paz de la Huerta

Decades: Les Must De Moschino event

Paz de la Huerta - Decades: Les Must De Moschino event at Decades - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 20th March 2014

Paz De La Huerta

Paz De La Huerta On Dinner Date

Paz de la Huerta - Paz De La Huerta in a black cocktail dress as she arrives for a dinner date with her male companion - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 5th December 2013

Paz De La Huerta
Paz De La Huerta
Paz De La Huerta
Paz De La Huerta
Paz De La Huerta

Enter The Void Review


Good
Ambitious Argentine-French filmmaker Noe is back with another gimmick (see the reverse-order Irreversible): this epic-length odyssey is told completely through the eyes of its central character. It's a gruelling film, but is packed with moments of filmmaking genius.

Oscar (Brown) is a young Westerner living in a one-room flat in Tokyo, where his life is a blur of drug-taking. He's utterly devoted to his sister Linda (de la Huerta), who's also in Tokyo working as an erotic dancer. While on a risky drug deal with his friend Alex (Roy), Oscar meets Victor (Alexander) at the seedy club Void. But they're caught in a police raid, and Oscar is shot, travelling out of his body into the night. Perhaps he can still watch over Linda from beyond the grave.

Continue reading: Enter The Void Review

The Limits of Control Review


Excellent
While it's probably too meandering and vague for mainstream cinemagoers, this offbeat thriller is a terrific example of Jarmusch's subtly cheeky tone, plus gorgeous Christopher Doyle cinematography and a terrific cast.

A lone man (De Bankole) is on a mysterious mission, flying into Madrid then travelling to Seville and Alicante. Along the way, he has a series of clandestine meetings with a nervous violinist (Tosar), an enigmatic blonde (Swinton), a naked seductress (de la Huerta), a British guitarist (Hurt), an edgy Mexican (Garcia Bernal), a silent driver (Abbas) and an arrogant American (Murray). But he's all business, never distracted from his assignment and quietly hearing the philosophy that seems to swirl around his every move.

Continue reading: The Limits of Control Review

The Limits of Control Review


Excellent
It was about three years ago when, emerging from a press screening of Pedro Almodóvar's Volver, a good friend said to me, "You just can't argue with Almodóvar," referring to the idiosyncratic style that the great Spanish director has held steady for nearly three decades now. It didn't matter that Volver was, arguably, one of the director's more languid entries in terms of story, thematic content, and ambition. It simply mattered that it was undeniably Almodóvar.

The Limits of Control, the 11th feature by the New York-born auteur Jim Jarmusch, is another work that is inarguably stamped by its director's idiosyncrasies and, like Volver, there have been several critics who have questioned if its artistic success is not so much a result of it being a Jarmusch film rather than simply a good film. It emits a dark-shade cool, as befits any Jarmusch joint, and it features several of the director's usual performers, including the Ivorian-born actor Isaach De Bankolé in the lead.

Continue reading: The Limits of Control Review

Fierce People Review


Grim
One could easily say that Griffin Dunne's new film Fierce People represents a great leap forward from such lamentable projects as Practical Magic and Addicted to Love, but then that's hardly setting the bar high at all. A bundle of good raw material and confused objectives, the film starts out as a skewed fable but ends up in grimmer territory, with no good reason for having traveled there, and begging to be taken more seriously.

Early scenes give every indication that what Dunne and screenwriter Dirk Wittenborn (who adapted his own novel) have in mind is yet another in the grand and hallowed tradition of "nothing was ever the same after that summer" stories, which it must be said, can often be a nice way to spend a couple hours on a dreary day. The narrator whose life is about to be changed is Finn Earl (Anton Yelchin), a 15-year-old fixated on his absentee dad, a famous anthropologist who wants Finn to come to South America and do field work with him for the summer. The stone around Finn's neck is his mother Liz (Diane Lane, nothing about whom will ever say "mother"), a masseuse with serious cocaine and drinking addictions. Picking the absolute worst time (in Finn's mind, given that he finally has a chance to reconnect with his dad) to get her life together, Liz packs the two of them up to go live with a former client of hers who Finn is convinced she's sleeping with.

Continue reading: Fierce People Review

A Walk To Remember Review


Good
A Walk to Remember can and will be known best as "The Mandy Moore Project," the first feature where the popular teen singer stars on the big screen. She is the focal point of the marketing, the reason that most kids will see the movie, and the one player to be under the microscope. Luckily for Moore, and the film, her flaws are few, as she slides easily into one of the more interesting teen roles in recent adolescent films, as the originality of her character, her well-metered performance, and director Adam Shankman's lively delivery lift this movie above most of its counterparts.

The film may look like a relative to the Freddie Prinze Jr. vehicle She's All That (1999), but it's more like a cousin to Robert Mulligan's The Man in the Moon (1991). The story begins predictably enough: Landon (Shane West), a young teen sowing his oats through his high school years, is forced to take on charity work after orchestrating a stupid stunt that nearly paralyzes a kid. While mopping up hallways and tutoring youngsters, he comes across Jamie Sullivan (Moore), a level-headed duckling (not so ugly), with a good heart and religion at her core. If this were Prinze pap, Landon would spruce her up and show the world what it's been missing. Instead, in this Karen Janszen adaptation of the Nicholas Sparks novel, Jamie stays true to herself, and the shy girl has a life-changing effect on the guy.

Continue reading: A Walk To Remember Review

Fierce People Review


Grim
One could easily say that Griffin Dunne's new film Fierce People represents a great leap forward from such lamentable projects as Practical Magic and Addicted to Love, but then that's hardly setting the bar high at all. A bundle of good raw material and confused objectives, the film starts out as a skewed fable but ends up in grimmer territory, with no good reason for having traveled there, and begging to be taken more seriously.

Early scenes give every indication that what Dunne and screenwriter Dirk Wittenborn (who adapted his own novel) have in mind is yet another in the grand and hallowed tradition of "nothing was ever the same after that summer" stories, which it must be said, can often be a nice way to spend a couple hours on a dreary day. The narrator whose life is about to be changed is Finn Earl (Anton Yelchin), a 15-year-old fixated on his absentee dad, a famous anthropologist who wants Finn to come to South America and do field work with him for the summer. The stone around Finn's neck is his mother Liz (Diane Lane, nothing about whom will ever say "mother"), a masseuse with serious cocaine and drinking addictions. Picking the absolute worst time (in Finn's mind, given that he finally has a chance to reconnect with his dad) to get her life together, Liz packs the two of them up to go live with a former client of hers who Finn is convinced she's sleeping with.

Continue reading: Fierce People Review

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