Paulo Costanzo

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Mark Feuerstein and Paulo Costanzo - 2013 USA Network Upfronts held at Pier 36 - Arrivals - New York City, United States - Wednesday 15th May 2013

Mark Feuerstein and Paulo Costanzo

Mark Feuerstein and Paulo Costanzo - 2013 USA Network Upfronts held at Pier 36 - Arrivals - New York, United States - Thursday 16th May 2013

Mark Feuerstein and Paulo Costanzo

Mark Feuerstein and Paulo Costanzo - 2013 USA Network Upfronts held at Pier 36 - Arrivals - New York, NY, United States - Friday 17th May 2013

Mark Feuerstein and Paulo Costanzo
Mark Feuerstein
Mark Feuerstein
Mark Feuerstein and Paulo Costanzo
Mark Feuerstein

Paulo Costanzo Tuesday 19th July 2011 filming on location for the television series 'Royal Pains' at the Intrepid Museum New York City, USA

Paulo Costanzo
Paulo Costanzo
Paulo Costanzo
Paulo Costanzo
Paulo Costanzo
Paulo Costanzo

Mark Feuerstein, Paulo Costanzo and Reshma Shetty - Mark Feuerstein, Paulo Costanzo, Reshma Shetty, Jill Flint from Royal Pains New York City, USA - the 2011 USA Upfront at The Tent at Lincoln Center Monday 2nd May 2011

Splinter Review


Excellent
Director Toby Wilkins' debut feature Splinter is a fast-paced, well-crafted bit of sci-fi horror with plenty of gore and thrills to keep audiences amped up and on-edge for much of its tight 85-minute running time. The title of Wilkins' film refers to the delivery method employed by its resident monster, a parasite that shoots splinters at its victims to infect them. All tangled limbs, snarling teeth, and contorted torso, the creature leaps, slithers, and growls with ferocious determination, and seems a descendent of John Carpenter's mutating menace in his remake of The Thing. While the monster's exact nature and cause are never fully explained, it hardly matters, because Wilkins, along with screenwriters Ian Shorr and Kai Barry, and a tight-knit, compelling cast keep us hooked, right out of the gate.

Wilkins posits Splinter's horrors in the backwoods of the American heartland where likeable couple -- bookish Seth (Paulo Costanzo) and outdoorsy Polly (Jill Wagner) find themselves on a camping trip with a broken tent. They ditch the camping idea, and set out in search of a motel to spend the night. En route, the two are ambushed by gun-wielding fugitive Dennis (Shea Whigham) and his strung-out girlfriend Lacey (Rachel Kerbs). The criminals hijack Seth, Polly, and their truck, and, driving on, pull over at the most unfortunate of gas stations. The creature has taken root here, having already "absorbed" both a dog and a hapless attendant, and now springs into action against the bewildered gang which retreats into the gas station's convenience store. Much of Splinter's action takes place here, behind the windows, aisles, and even the freezers of the store, as Seth and Polly form an uneasy alliance with Dennis, who's left sans girlfriend after Lacey meets a grisly fate, and together they try to outwit the primal terror.

Continue reading: Splinter Review

Everything's Gone Green Review


Good
I'll confess that I only put the Everything's Gone Green screener in my DVD player because it was written by Douglas Coupland, one of my favorite novelists. But would his odd blend of sarcasm and observations about the human condition translate to a movie? Especially one touted on the cover with the words "Warning: This Slacker Comedy Is Unrated"?

Continue reading: Everything's Gone Green Review

40 Days & 40 Nights Review


Good

One of the more gratifying feelings a movie critic can have is the feeling of going into a picture expecting tiresome clichés of an overplayed genre, only to discover delightfully surprising freshness and soul where all the hackneyed conventions usually are.

"40 Days and 40 Nights" is such a movie. Misleadingly marketed as just another misogynistic romp through the young male libido, this often ribald comedy about a frustrated 20-something giving up sex for Lent is what the puerile, simplistic "American Pie," "Tomcats" and "Saving Silverman" might have been, had they been made by people with imagination and wit.

Directed by Michael Lehmann -- the man behind the twisted teen angst and irony of the subversive '80s cult hit "Heathers" -- "40 Days" finds many new and inventive ways to make sexual frustration funny.

Continue reading: 40 Days & 40 Nights Review

Road Trip Review


OK

The plot is dumb: A flunking Joe College (Breckin Meyer) drives 1,800 miles with a carload of crazy buddies to stop the delivery of a homemade sex tape he shot with a hot Betty Coed (Amy Smart) -- then accidentally mailed to his long-time, long-distance sweetheart (Rachel Blanchard).

The characters are elementary: Meyer's traveling companions include the Overstimulated Stud (Seann William Scott) who assures him it's not cheating if you're in different area codes, the Stoner Dude (Paulo Costanzo) and the Apprehensive 98-lb. Nerd (DJ Qualls) who is the only guy they know who owns a road-worthy car.

The humor is crude: Fat jokes, geek-virgin gags and boobs, boobs, boobs. (And as if that's not enough, Tom Green -- MTV's crown purveyor of questionably comical perversion -- has a significant role as the narrator, a brain-fried, 30-something career student.)

Continue reading: Road Trip Review

Josie & The Pussycats Review


Weak

If you were to take the 1998 Spice Girls movie called "Spice World," then remove all the self-deprecation, all the homages to "Hard Day's Night," and all the surprising wit that made it such a great guilty pleasure, what you'd be left with would closely resemble the new "Josie and the Pussycats" movie -- although the results would still be less formulaic.

A live-action revival of the girlie rock band from the Archie comics and Saturday Morning cartoons, "Josie" is a hypocritical satire of MTV conformity that carefully tippy-toes around its mockery of the fickle pop music market so as not to rock the boat with its target audience -- those very same conformist teenagers at whom it pokes fun.

As the movie opens, the private plane carrying a boy band called Dejour (ha ha, very funny) has just been crashed on the command of their evil manager Wyatt Frame (Alan Cumming), who had to get rid of the boys after they discovered the record company's subliminal messages planted in their songs.

Continue reading: Josie & The Pussycats Review

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Paulo Costanzo Movies

Splinter Movie Review

Splinter Movie Review

Director Toby Wilkins' debut feature Splinter is a fast-paced, well-crafted bit of sci-fi horror with...

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40 Days & 40 Nights Movie Review

40 Days & 40 Nights Movie Review

One of the more gratifying feelings a movie critic can have is the feeling of...

Road Trip Movie Review

Road Trip Movie Review

The plot is dumb: A flunking Joe College (Breckin Meyer) drives 1,800 miles with a...

Josie & The Pussycats Movie Review

Josie & The Pussycats Movie Review

If you were to take the 1998 Spice Girls movie called "Spice World," then remove...

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