Paul Osborn

Paul Osborn

Paul Osborn Quick Links

Film RSS

Madame Curie Review


Excellent
Hey, I never thought the hunt for radium would make for an engrossing way to spend two hours, but Madame Curie reveals itself to be one of the most engaging biopics of its era. Reuniting the stars of Mrs. Miniver (as heralded on the poster), Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon make for perfect Marie and Pierre Curie, respectively. The film covers virtually their entire adult lives, from Marie's early interest in math and science to her "business only" marriage to Pierre, to their joint work searching for a mysterious radioactive substance in pitchblende ore, melting tons of material over many years and eventually coming up with a couple of grams of the stuff. While Pierre dies early (not from radiation poisoning, he was hit by a carriage), Marie would go on to win two Nobel Prizes. Her death (from radiation exposure) is off camera. Both Garson and Pidgeon are outstanding, and the film's treatment of science is both incredibly realistic and, shockingly, a lot of fun.

South Pacific (1958) Review


Excellent
This is an embarrassing statement for a man to make but I think that South Pacific is one of my favorite old movies. As an art form, the musical is dubious at best. And Joshua Logan was not one of the great Hollywood directors -- as demonstrated by the film's uneven pacing and use of colorful camera filters during certain intense scenes.

So why is this movie a classic? Because it was produced soon after WWII, when even Hollywood war romances had a serious edge. Because it was filmed on location (well, Hawaii, I think) and in full Technicolor glamour. And because the occasion brought out the best in Rodgers and Hammerstein, when the songwriting team wrote poignant and thoughtful lyrics put to classic melodies.

Continue reading: South Pacific (1958) Review

South Pacific (1958) Review


Excellent
This is an embarrassing statement for a man to make but I think that South Pacific is one of my favorite old movies. As an art form, the musical is dubious at best. And Joshua Logan was not one of the great Hollywood directors -- as demonstrated by the film's uneven pacing and use of colorful camera filters during certain intense scenes.

So why is this movie a classic? Because it was produced soon after WWII, when even Hollywood war romances had a serious edge. Because it was filmed on location (well, Hawaii, I think) and in full Technicolor glamour. And because the occasion brought out the best in Rodgers and Hammerstein, when the songwriting team wrote poignant and thoughtful lyrics put to classic melodies.

Continue reading: South Pacific (1958) Review

East Of Eden Review


Extraordinary
Elia Kazan's East of Eden packs as powerful a punch today as it must have 50 years ago when it introduced an exciting new star, James Dean, to a wide-eyed audience that had never seen anything quite him before... unless they were Brando fans. This is big moviemaking, with big themes, big performances, big CinemaScope shots, and big, bright "WarnerColor" images. It's the kind of movie that a million Ashton Kutchers and a million Brett Ratners couldn't make in a million years.

John Steinbeck's classic story draws on the Biblical tale of Cain and Abel, the two warring brothers from the Old Testament, and although Cain doesn't slay Abel in this version of the story, he comes close. Dean brings his emotive Method style to the role of Cal Trask, the "bad" son who must compete with his golden boy brother Aron (Richard Davalos) for the love of their cold, Bible-thumping father Adam (Raymond Massey). Together they work a lettuce farm in central California's fertile Salinas Valley. It's 1917, and World War I is raging overseas.

Continue reading: East Of Eden Review

Sayonara Review


Good
James Michener's novel about an American G.I. (Marlon Brando) who falls in love with a Japanese kabuki starlet (Miiko Taka) after the Korean War is both timeless and bizarre. Timeless because it has that Romeo and Juliet feeling of crossed cultures -- the love affair made difficult here due to military rules and societal pressures, not to mention the fact that Brando's character agrees with those rules and pressures to start with. It's bizarre because of Brando's histrionics (Referring to sake, he says nervously to his Japanese gal, "We got rice back home but we just make rice pudding out of it, we don't drink it!"), Red Buttons in a serious role, and Ricardo Montalban playing a Japanese man (at least I think he's supposed to be Japanese). It's crazy. You won't know whether to laugh or cry, but you won't be able to look away.
Paul Osborn

Paul Osborn Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Filmmaker


'Green Room' Tops Our List Of 2016's Most Exciting Horrors

'Green Room' Tops Our List Of 2016's Most Exciting Horrors

It joins '10 Cloverfield Lane' and the upcoming ghost story 'The Conjuring 2'.

Paul Osborn Movies

Advertisement
East Of Eden Movie Review

East Of Eden Movie Review

Elia Kazan's East of Eden packs as powerful a punch today as it must have...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.