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Magnificent Desolation: Walking On The Moon 3D Review


Very Good
When Tom Hanks gets his mitts on a topic, he squeezes it within an inch of its life. So just when you thought Hanks was done with space (Apollo 13, From The Earth to the Moon), he teams with NASA and an all-star roster of talent for this thorough, occasionally thrilling 3D IMAX feature.vMagnificent Desolation is another Hanks love letter to the country's lunar program, and his earnestness makes for compelling content about American moon voyages and the details within. But the real awe comes from the film's incredible 3D, giant screen versions of moonwalks, as guided by director Mark Cowen.

Smartly, Cowen and his team recreate the real thing and then some. They posit what could have happened, a surprisingly chilly reality about the inherent dangers -- and possible disasters -- that awaited the men who walked on the moon. When Hanks, in an entertaining voiceover, reveals that hours and hours of moonwalks resulted in zero error, he imparts a real sense of pride and relief. And when the film imagines the slightest of problems, the fear is real too.

Continue reading: Magnificent Desolation: Walking On The Moon 3D Review

Magnificent Desolation: Walking On The Moon 3D Review


Very Good
When Tom Hanks gets his mitts on a topic, he squeezes it within an inch of its life. So just when you thought Hanks was done with space (Apollo 13, From The Earth to the Moon), he teams with NASA and an all-star roster of talent for this thorough, occasionally thrilling 3D IMAX feature.

Magnificent Desolation is another Hanks love letter to the country's lunar program, and his earnestness makes for compelling content about American moon voyages and the details within. But the real awe comes from the film's incredible 3D, giant screen versions of moonwalks, as guided by director Mark Cowen.

Continue reading: Magnificent Desolation: Walking On The Moon 3D Review

Slap Shot Review


Good
What's all the fuss about? Canadians, hockey enthusiasts, and especially Canadian hockey enthusiasts absolutely love this movie, but it's hardly the comic masterpiece it's made out to be. Sure, there's plenty of ranuchy one-liners, filthy language (almost shocking coming out of Paul Newman's mouth), and male moonings, but the most amusing tidbit is that is was actually written by a woman. Go figure.

Message In A Bottle Review


Terrible
Most days I would love to be in the shoes of people in Hollywood. Much as participating in the play is every secret playwright's dream, and painting the picture is every secret photographer's dream, being in THE BIZ is the secret dream of every movie critic I know. We apply to film school. We try to make movies. Some of us even write them, such as Roger Ebert, author of the movie Beyond the Valley of the Dolls.

But, one person to another, I wouldn't be in Robin Wright Penn's shoes if you paid me a million dollars.

Continue reading: Message In A Bottle Review

Where The Money Is Review


Good
At more than one point in his career, Paul Newman has been the ultimate con man. The Sting, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Cool Hand Luke, The Hustler, and The Color of Money all epitomized this master of smooth talk and wily ways. But the successes of all of his past films and all of their cons have one common denominator: a memorable and talented supporting cast. In The Hustler, Jackie Gleason played Minnesota Fats, who proved to be a worthy nemesis by outsmarting the cocky and more talented Newman. Tom Cruise, in The Color of Money, was like an apprentice learning from the master sorcerer, as Newman molded Cruise into an effigy of his old self. While Newman always emerged the star, he would continually share the spotlight, so that none of those movies became one-dimensional.

Newman's latest film, Where the Money Is, directed by Marek Kanievska (Less Than Zero), unfortunately lacks the supporting cast for Newman to thrive as the luminary "hustler." In the film, Newman plays Henry Manning, a former bank robber who plans to break out of prison by faking a stroke. When he is transferred to a minimum-security nursing home, he thinks he's home free. However, the woman assigned to take care of him, Carol Ann McKay (Linda Fiorentino - Men in Black) suspects that he's a fake and attempts to lure him out of his trance so he will help her in a burglary with her and her husband Wayne (Dermot Mulroney - Copycat, My Best Friend's Wedding). She goes to some outrageous lengths to keep him from playing possum, but when she finally awakes the bank robbing legend, she faces a challenge that could change her life.

Continue reading: Where The Money Is Review

The Sting Review


Extraordinary
It's one of cinema's most beloved heist movies, and for good reason: The Sting is balls-out fun from start to finish, a showstopper work for both Robert Redford and Paul Newman, and alternately funny and thrilling.

The plot must have been devilishly complex at the time. In more recent years we've had films like House of Games and The Spanish Prisoner that make The Sting's intricacies look like a story in a first-grader's textbook. It's the Depression, and Johnny Hooker (Redford) makes a living running quickie cons on the street. When he scams several thousand dollars off of a mob guy, the heat comes down from both the mafiosos looking for their money and the crooked cops, culminating in Hooker's partner getting killed and Hooker escaping the city for hopefully better climes.

Continue reading: The Sting Review

Mr. & Mrs. Bridge Review


Weak
Merchant-Ivory, working stateside for once. Maybe not such a good idea, as this Paul Newman/Joanne Woodward vehicle is dry as dust, chronicling with detached boredom the ups and downs of the Bridge family, of which Newman is the head. Tiresome and uninspired, it ends as abruptly as it begins, with nary an audience member to care about any of it.

Nobody's Fool Review


Very Good
Paul Newman is back as the title character of Nobody's Fool. Nobody's Fool is a study of small-town life in upstate New York, focused on Newman as the go-between among a dozen or so townsfolk. Superb performances abound, particularly by Jessica Tandy (in her final role) and Bruce Willis, and even Melanie Griffith as Newman's would-be love interest performs with genuine emotion. Newman steals the show, of course, as the flawed Everyman who chooses to just let life happen and not make a big show of it.

Continue reading: Nobody's Fool Review

Absence Of Malice Review


Very Good
Another bash the media film, but 15 years before its time. Am I the only one that had trouble buying the Newman-Field romance? Didn't think so.

The Hudsucker Proxy Review


Excellent

Uber-quirky but strangely satisfying Coen escapade, skewering the world of big business (at least as it existed in the 1950s), as a company schemes to drive the price of the stock down by installing an imbecile (Tim Robbins) as president. This isn't Fargo, not by a longshot, but it's not meant to be. This is one of those fun little flicks that really, really grows on you, featuring amazing performances by Robbins, Paul Newman, and Charles Durning, and even a memorable (if rote) appearance by Jennifer Jason Leigh. But what really sticks with you is the ultra-clever dialogue... "You know, for kids!"

Road To Perdition Review


OK

Let's dispel right now any claims of "Road to Perdition" being an extraordinary, Oscar-worthy film, as its advertising campaign touts.

This redemption fable set against a 1930s gangland backdrop may be vividly realized by director Sam Mendes ("American Beauty") and reasonably well acted by a talented cast. But while the picture's mood is inspired by the independent spirit of 1970s crime dramas, it's been given a send-'em-home-smiling, corporate Hollywood scrubbing clean. It has simplistically clear-cut (if somewhat cloaked) morals, it follows a rigidly predictable story arc, and it does not feature the departure performance by Tom Hanks that you may have been hearing about.

Sure Hanks plays an Irish mafia enforcer with a tommy gun and a taste for revenge. But he's a good and troubled soul, trying to save his 12-year-old son from the kind of life he's led. That makes Michael Sullivan very much a Tom Hanks kind of character. He may be sullied, but ultimately he's modest and heroic.

Continue reading: Road To Perdition Review

Where The Money Is Review


OK

Even in his 70s, strapped into a wheelchair and (supposedly) paralyzed by a stroke, Paul Newman is magnetic.

In the caper comedy "Where the Money Is" he plays an aged bank robber who has spent the better part of his life in the can. His first hint of freedom in eons has come when he's transferred to a nursing home after suffering a seizure that has left him a near vegetable.

Or has it? Even motionless and contorted there's still that glint in his eye -- which doesn't go unnoticed by one caretaker, played by Linda Fiorentino.

Continue reading: Where The Money Is Review

Paul Newman

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Paul Newman

Date of birth

26th January, 1925

Date of death

26th September, 2008

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.77


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Paul Newman Movies

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Cars Movie Review

Cars Movie Review

Almost every major sport has a companion film, the one movie fans routinely point to...

Magnificent Desolation: Walking on the Moon 3D Movie Review

Magnificent Desolation: Walking on the Moon 3D Movie Review

When Tom Hanks gets his mitts on a topic, he squeezes it within an inch...

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Magnificent Desolation: Walking on the Moon 3D Movie Review

Magnificent Desolation: Walking on the Moon 3D Movie Review

When Tom Hanks gets his mitts on a topic, he squeezes it within an inch...

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