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Patricia Clarkson , Dana Friedman - New York premiere of 'Learning To Drive' at The Paris Theatre - Red Carpet Arrivals at Paris Theater - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 17th August 2015

Patricia Clarkson and Dana Friedman
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Ben Kingsley and Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson and Dana Friedman

Patricia Clarkson - American Theatre Wing's 69th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall - Red Carpet Arrivals at Radio City Music hall, Tony Awards - New York City, New York, United States - Sunday 7th June 2015

Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson

Alessandro Nivola, Patricia Clarkson and Bradley Cooper - A host of stars were photographed as they arrived for the Meet the 2015 Tony Nominees reception which was held at the Paramount Hotel in New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 29th April 2015

Alessandro Nivola, Patricia Clarkson and Bradley Cooper
Alessandro Nivola, Patricia Clarkson and Bradley Cooper
Alessandro Nivola
Alessandro Nivola

Bryan Batt and Patricia Clarkson - Photographs of a variety of stars as they arrived to the Opening night of Broadway's musical comedy 'It Shoulda Been You' which was held at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 14th April 2015

Bryan Batt and Patricia Clarkson

Patricia Clarkson - Cast members from 'The Elephant Man' receive their portraits at Sardi's famous theatre district eatery. at Sardi's, - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 2nd April 2015

Patricia Clarkson
Max Klimavicius and Patricia Clarkson
Max Klimavicius and Patricia Clarkson
Max Klimavicius and Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson

Patricia Clarkson - 2015 New York Spring Spectacular Opening Night at Radio City Music Hall - Arrivals at Radio City Music hall - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 26th March 2015

Patricia Clarkson

Alessandro Nivola and Patricia Clarkson - Shots of a host of stars as they arrived to the Opening night of The Heidi Chronicles which was held at the Music Box Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 19th March 2015

Alessandro Nivola and Patricia Clarkson
Alessandro Nivola and Patricia Clarkson

Patricia Clarkson - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the Vanity Fair Oscar Party which was held at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 23rd February 2015

Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson

Patricia Clarkson - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the Vanity Fair Oscar Party which was held at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 22nd February 2015

Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson

Bradley Cooper, Patricia Clarkson and Alessandro Nivola - Opening night after party for The Elephant Man held at Gotham Hall - Arrivals. at Gotham Hall,, Gotham Hall - New York, New York, United States - Monday 8th December 2014

Bradley Cooper, Patricia Clarkson and Alessandro Nivola
Bradley Cooper
Bradley Cooper
Bradley Cooper
Bradley Cooper
Bradley Cooper

Christopher Bannow, Amanda Lea Mason, Marguerite Stimpson, Scott Lowell, Patricia Clarkson, Anthony Heald, Bradley Cooper and Alessandro Nivola - The first preview curtain call for Bradley Cooper in Broadway's The Elephant Man at the Booth Theatre. - New York, New York, United States - Saturday 8th November 2014

Christopher Bannow, Amanda Lea Mason, Marguerite Stimpson, Scott Lowell, Patricia Clarkson, Anthony Heald, Bradley Cooper and Alessandro Nivola
Christopher Bannow, Amanda Lea Mason, Marguerite Stimpson, Scott Lowell, Patricia Clarkson, Anthony Heald and Bradley Cooper
Christopher Bannow, Amanda Lea Mason, Marguerite Stimpson, Scott Lowell, Anthony Heald, Bradley Cooper, Patricia Clarkson, Alessandro Nivola, Kathryn Meisle and Henry Stram
Anthony Heald, Bradley Cooper, Patricia Clarkson and Alessandro Nivola
Christopher Bannow, Amanda Lea Mason, Marguerite Stimpson, Scott Lowell, Anthony Heald, Bradley Cooper, Patricia Clarkson and Alessandro Nivola
Scott Lowell, Anthony Heald, Bradley Cooper, Patricia Clarkson and Alessandro Nivola

Patricia Clarkson, Bradley Cooper, Alessandro Nivola and Cast - Stars of Broadway's new show 'The Elephant Man' attended a photocall which was held at Sardi's restaurant in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 21st October 2014

Patricia Clarkson, Bradley Cooper, Alessandro Nivola and Cast
Bradley Cooper, Patricia Clarkson and Alessandro Nivola
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson

Patricia Clarkson - Hamptons International Film Festival - Chairmans Reception - East Hampton, New York, United States - Sunday 12th October 2014

Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson

Isabel Coixet and Patricia Clarkson - Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) - 'Learning To Drive' - Premiere - Toronto, Canada - Tuesday 9th September 2014

Isabel Coixet and Patricia Clarkson
Isabel Coixet
Isabel Coixet

Patricia Clarkson - 2014 Vanity Fair Oscar Party held at Sunset Tower in West Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 2nd March 2014

Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson

Video - Patrick Wilson And Kid Cudi Among The Many Arrivals At The 'Gravity' NY Premiere - Part 3


The New York premiere of space thriller 'Gravity' brought with it a host of actors and other famous faces from every area of the entertainment world including 'Pieces of April' actress and Oscar nominee Patricia Clarkson, 'Insidious' star Patrick Wilson and rapper/singer Kid Cudi.

Continue: Video - Patrick Wilson And Kid Cudi Among The Many Arrivals At The 'Gravity' NY Premiere - Part 3

Video - Director Alfonso Cuaron Spotted At 'Gravity' NY Premiere - Part 2


Alfonso Cuaron, director of space thriller movie 'Gravity', was snapped at the New York premiere of the movie alongside his son and co-writer Jonas Cuaron. The film stars Sandra Bullock and George Clooney - who are the only visible actors on screen - and is set to be released in the UK on November 8th 2013.

Continue: Video - Director Alfonso Cuaron Spotted At 'Gravity' NY Premiere - Part 2

Video - Julia Stiles, Oliver Platt And Howard Stern At 'Silver Linings Playbook' Premiere NY


Guests arrive at the 'Silver Linings Playbook' premiere in New York City. Among them are some of the movie's stars Brea Bee with her partner Bill Eccleston, Shea Whigham, John Ortiz and Julia Stiles, as well as the author of the 'Silver Linings Playbook novel' Matthew Quick with his wife Alicia Bessette, radio presenter Howard Stern with his model wife Beth Ostrosky, 'Huff' star Oliver Platt, singer Vanessa Carlton, talk show host Donny Deutsch and 'Pieces of April' star Patricia Clarkson.

Continue: Video - Julia Stiles, Oliver Platt And Howard Stern At 'Silver Linings Playbook' Premiere NY

One Day Trailer


Emma Morley and Dexter Mayhew meet at Edinburgh University and graduate on July 15th, 1988. On the same day, they spend a chaste night together and begin a friendship that will last for the rest of their lives.

Continue: One Day Trailer

Friends With Benefits Trailer


Jamie and Dylan are two good friends who both currently find themselves too busy with other commitments to try and find a suitable partner. They decide to try something new, a no strings attached relationship which basically only involves a lot of sex and not much else.

Continue: Friends With Benefits Trailer

Easy A Review


Very Good
Smarter than your average teen comedy, this snappy movie knows how to keeps us laughing. But while the plot touches on some truths about teen sexuality, it feels constrained by the genre to be rather moralising about it.

To clear up confusion, 17-year-old Olive (Stone) is doing a live webcast outlining the chain of events that began when she inadvertently started a rumour that she'd lost her virginity. After letting the gossip grow, she's now known as the school slut; in the process she loses her best pal (Michalka) and wages war on the class goody-goody (Bynes). Her parents (Clarkson and Tucci) know the truth, as does her favourite teacher (Church), although the hearsay is about to upset his marriage to the school's guidance counsellor (Kudrow).

Continue reading: Easy A Review

Legendary Trailer


Mike and Cal are brothers but since the death of their father - almost ten years earlier - they haven't spent much time together. Mike is a lot older than his brother and has been lost touch with his mother. Feeling a need to re-connect with his brother and the want to achieve something, Cal joins the wrestling team dispite his slender frame. The brothers connect over a love of the sport although their mother isn't over enthusiastic about the idea.

Continue: Legendary Trailer

Shutter Island Trailer


Watch the trailer for Shutter Island

Continue: Shutter Island Trailer

Elegy Review


OK
Not every book is meant to be adapted into a movie. Come to think of it, not every author is meant for celluloid success. Philip Roth has won pretty much every major book prize, save for the Nobel, and he's overdue for that. His books masterfully examine the fragile side of the middle-aged male ego, and how sex and family and desire eat away at men's souls. With Updike, Mailer, and Bellow gone, Roth is the messiah of American literature.

There's just one problem: Books like his make crappy movies. Roth said as much to GQ's Andrew Corsello, adding that he hasn't been pleased with any of the adaptations, especially The Human Stain. Roth's take: "Awful! And the same people have American Pastoral."

Continue reading: Elegy Review

Married Life Trailer


Watch the trailer for Married Life.

Continue: Married Life Trailer

Vicky Cristina Barcelona Review


Good
Woody Allen's Vicky Cristina Barcelona, the venerable director's fourth consecutive film made outside of the U.S. (and more importantly, outside of New York City), is made up of scenes featuring well-spoken, awkwardly-placed rich people drinking wine, eating excellent Spanish cuisine, and visiting beautifully-aged sets that range from odd museums to classic villas to an amusement park that looks too gorgeous to run electricity through. As if one needed more reason to love Barcelona, it now turns out they have a Tilt-A-Whirl.

When previously in London, Allen used all sharp tones, imagery wise. Even the shopfronts had perfect diction. At first, this yielded excellent results (Match Point) and the stage was set for a resurrection of the eternal Kvetch. Allen's two follow-ups, Scoop and Cassandra's Dream, debunked those hopes, proving that very same sharpness can lead to the visually mundane. In Spain, however, everything already has a built-in romance to it. The old-style Spanish houses, the Gaudi architecture, the auditory splendor of Spanish guitar playing: You're supposed to swoon on cue and you do.

Continue reading: Vicky Cristina Barcelona Review

Married Life Review


Good
Married Life, a new film from director Ira Sachs, feels very much like a film from a different era -- a fact that's mostly enjoyable, with a few minor exceptions. Set in the late 1940s, presumably in and around New York City, Married Life tells the story of Harry Allen (Chris Cooper), a wealthy businessman who one day confesses to his old friend Richard (Pierce Brosnan) that he intends to leave his wife and take up with his mistress. Complications arise when Harry decides the only way out of his marriage is to murder his wife, while at the same time his pal Richard goes behind his back and courts the affection of his mistress.

What's pleasurable about this film, and the way the story unfolds, is its elegant simplicity. No more than ten minutes into the movie, Sachs and his co-screenwriter Oren Moverman have skillfully limned each of the main characters' hopes and ambitions and set in motion the levers of conflict that drive the story forward. Harry wants to experience the type of romantic love that has long since vanished, if it ever existed, from his marriage with Pat (Patricia Clarkson), while she, for her part, longs for greater passion and the adolescent thrill of sex. Kay (Rachel McAdams), Harry's mistress, seeks true love for the second time after losing her husband in World War II, and Richard, a womanizing bachelor, hopes to discover the ability to form an emotional connection with a woman.

Continue reading: Married Life Review

Lars And The Real Girl Review


OK
Lars and the Real Girl is not a comedy, despite the urge to laugh at a man who is romantically infatuated with his life-like sex doll. The title character is a socially maladjusted young man who doesn't speak much and can't stand being touched. But just like anyone else, he gets lonely. When the answer to his prayers arrives in a UPS box, he begins an emotional journey through his delusional relationship. Sure, it sounds like Farrelly brothers fodder, but director Craig Gillespie plays it straight -- for better and for worse.

Once the anatomically-correct doll arrives and Lars introduces it to his brother and his wife, the laughs dissipate as quickly as they arise. It's absurd for sure, Lars parading around a doll as a real person -- cutting up her meat at dinner and tucking her into bed at night -- but there is no over-acting nor subjective shots that would emphasize the ridiculousness. Instead, shaky, hand-held shots amp up the tension when Lars' brother and his wife are arguing in the kitchen over how to handle Lars and his new lover.

Continue reading: Lars And The Real Girl Review

The Green Mile Review


Excellent
The Green Mile? Let's talk about 26 miles. The length of a marathon. Start the race and the movie together: The race would long be over before the film. The winner would be at home, taking a nap. Yes, The Green Mile is three hours long.

Not that long movies have never been successful, and not that The Green Mile is bad. You might even think a long movie is required here. Pulled from Stephen King's acclaimed series of six books by the same name, King returns to the kind of work he was doing in The Shawshank Redemption (based on a short story of his), the kind that seems to perform the best, away from splatter and gore, and into the minds of the strangest of characters.

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

The Woods Review


Bad
In 2003 director Lucky McKee put out a quiet and little-seen horror film called May. After much prodding, I finally watched the thing, and, well... that was what the fuss was all about?

McKee returned earlier this year with a follow-up, another "thinking man's" horror film that didn't garner the same attention. It barely got a theatrical release (which I could convince none of my critics to go see), and I can't find any reports of its box office gross aside from a blunt "$0."

Continue reading: The Woods Review

The Dying Gaul Review


Good
In 1995, the internet was still a strange, scary destination for most Americans, a primary meeting place for pornography hounds and other assorted lonely creeps who sought out the thrilling anonymity of the web's myriad chat rooms. Based on one of his plays, Craig Lucas' (The Secret Lives of Dentists, Prelude to a Kiss) directorial debut The Dying Gaul is fascinated with the dangerous allure of these online social venues, which provide users with identity secrecy and, thus, the means to express taboo fantasies (and deal with emotionally corrosive issues) from the comfort and safety of home. Part movie industry critique and part Greek tragedy, Lucas' film charts the modem-enabled turmoil between a married Tinsletown power couple and an aspiring gay screenwriter in the luxurious Hollywood hills, a trio whose interpersonal dynamic is irreparably disrupted thanks to the nasty role-playing opportunities afforded by computers. Yet with its story of rampant duplicity and showbiz shallowness tied to a now technologically outdated mid-'90s milieu, and with its satire weighed down by banality, The Dying Gaul seems relevant only insofar as its cast effectively pinpoints the vengeful malice born from spurned love and squandered trust.

Jeffrey (Campbell Scott) is a bottom line-driven producer interested in Robert's (Peter Sarsgaard) script "The Dying Gaul," a semi-autobiographical tale about AIDS based on his relationship with his now-dead agent and partner Malcolm (Bill Camp). However, to make the project commercially viable, Jeffrey demands that Robert change the central couple from a homosexual to heterosexual duo. Jettisoning his integrity, Robert sells out and does as Jeffrey asks, in the process pocketing $1 million and establishing a close-knit friendship with Jeffrey and his failed screenwriter wife Elaine (Patricia Clarkson), whose life is so purposeless that learning how to control her multi-million dollar house's blinds constitutes an exciting afternoon. Yet the happy threesome's relationship is soon torn asunder when, after learning that Robert frequents chat rooms, Elaine strikes up an in-disguise online conversation with her new friend and learns that he's having an affair with Jeffrey. This devastating discovery frighteningly undercuts Elaine's sense of security and stability while also igniting a desire for retribution, leading to a dangerous game of cyberspace cat-and-mouse in which Elaine poses as the back-from-the-dead spirit of Malcolm and, ultimately, each character's true, less-than-savory personalities are drawn out into the blinding L.A. light of day.

Continue reading: The Dying Gaul Review

Everybody's All-American Review


OK
The most striking thing in Everybody's All-American, aside from the atrocious hair and make-up work in the movie's last 20 minutes, is in how little of the material is noteworthy. The drama covers four decades, the demise of the Old South, marital infidelity, and the perils of hero worship and bankruptcy. However, director Taylor Hackford and screenwriter Tom Rickman make the mistake of profiling problems, and not the people dealing with them.

Everybody's All-American stars Dennis Quaid and Jessica Lange, who first meet at Louisiana State University. He's Gavin Grey, an earnest football star who can do no wrong; she's Babs, the beauty queen who sees them as a couple and nothing else. They marry. He gets drafted to play in the National Football League and they build a life together. They have lots of kids, start a business and try to maintain the glowing example they set for an adoring campus.

Continue reading: Everybody's All-American Review

The Green Mile Review


Excellent
The Green Mile? Let's talk about 26 miles. The length of a marathon. Start the race and the movie together: The race would long be over before the film. The winner would be at home, taking a nap. Yes, The Green Mile is three hours long.

Not that long movies have never been successful, and not that The Green Mile is bad. You might even think a long movie is required here. Pulled from Stephen King's acclaimed series of six books by the same name, King returns to the kind of work he was doing in The Shawshank Redemption (based on a short story of his), the kind that seems to perform the best, away from splatter and gore, and into the minds of the strangest of characters.

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

Joe Gould's Secret Review


Very Good
When Mel Brooks played the Louis XVI in The History of the World, Part I, he often commented, "It's good to be the King." Joe Gould, a voluntarily homeless man, thinks that it's good to be the Bum... and it shows.

Joe Gould spends his days in Greenwich Village, making notes on the subject of humanity. He is compiling an oral history of mankind, a series of transcripts of conversations and essays on the nature of man. He does this by writing at every opportunity in composition books and by mooching off of rich Beatniks during the 50s in New York City. Amongst his supporters: painter Alice Neel (Susan Sarandon), E.E. Cummings, gallery owner Vivian Marquie (Patricia Clarkson) and publishing executive Charlie Duell (Steve Martin). These supporters frequently allow Joe Gould to stay at their homes, as well as contribute small sums of money to the Joe Gould fund.

Continue reading: Joe Gould's Secret Review

Simply Irresistable Review


Weak
Picture Like Water for Chocolate set in New York City's dining frenzy--only really boring and stupid.

Sheesh, here we have one of those You've Got Mail-style romances, with dueling heroes (here, Gellar is the little bistro chef, doing battle with Flanery's shopping center epicurian palace). Gellar's little shop is headed south, so it's Flanery to the rescue, right? Well, the secret that makes movies like The Shop Around the Corner work is that the heroes hate each other at first, then grow to love one another. Here, it's love at first sight, courtesy of a magic crab.

Continue reading: Simply Irresistable Review

Good Night, And Good Luck Review


Excellent
One doesn't need much more of a reason to go to the movies than this: Edward R. Murrow taking on Senator Joe McCarthy (at the height of his power), crisp black-and-white cinematography, the clink of ice cubes over scotch, voluptuous clouds of cigarette smoke hanging in the air, a nation's conscience dangling in the balance. So it is with George Clooney's Good Night, and Good Luck, a film where the mood - just shy of too cool for its own good - sets the scene for Murrow, the patron saint of journalism, to cajole and castigate the audience in a time of complacency. It also has a great jazz soundtrack.

The story of the witch-hunt has endlessly retold, usually laden with the same self-satisfied 20/20 hindsight that afflicts stories of the civil rights movement, and fortunately Clooney and co-writer Grant Heslov see no need to go through it all again. With admirable precision, they've sliced away most all the accoutrements often used to open up the era for the modern viewer, ala Quiz Show. This is a film that takes place almost entirely inside a CBS studio and newsroom, with occasional trips to hallways, elevators, and a network executive's wood-paneled office. Once, they all go out to a bar. It's best in the studio, because that's where we find Murrow - incarnated with almost indecent accuracy by David Strathairn - looking and sounding like as though Rod Serling had decided to rejoin the human race, his manner clipped and astringent, cigarette cocked in one hand like a talisman warding off evil.

Continue reading: Good Night, And Good Luck Review

The Station Agent Review


Very Good
Meet Finbar McBride. Besides having a cool name, Finbar's (Peter Dinklage) most noticeable attribute is that he is a dwarf who stands about 4-foot-5. And he's bitter about this. As a result, he is a laconic fellow who keeps to himself and has no friends. But he does have a passion for trains. One day Fin's work colleague dies and leaves him a train depot in New Jersey as an inheritance. Fin - who apparently has nothing else to do in his life - packs up his suitcase, walks many miles (on the train tracks) into New Jersey, and sets up his new home inside the run-down depot.

Right from the beginning we are brought into the leisurely pace of Fin's ascetic life. He doesn't eat or drink much, he spends his days studying old trains or reading about them, and he walks almost everywhere because he can't drive and he doesn't like crowded buses or trains. And it's pretty obvious why; every time he gets around people they stare at him and make comments.

Continue reading: The Station Agent Review

Far From Heaven Review


Excellent
Todd Haynes must have a thing for torturing poor Julianne Moore, and what'd she ever do to him?

First she was reduced to an allergic-to-everything blob of flesh in Safe. Now she's emotionally torn asunder as her husband goes gay and the only man she can turn to happens to be black.

Continue reading: Far From Heaven Review

All The Real Girls Review


Excellent
David Gordon Green's All the Real Girls (the follow-up to his astonishing 2000 debut George Washington) exhibits the same gently lackadaisical rhythm and acute perception of human joy and misery that made his debut such a success, even as it charts new territory. A dreamy tale of the wondrous elation and sometimes terrible sorrow that accompanies love, the Sundance hit - about the budding relationship between an immature rabble-rouser and the sister of his best friend - occasionally threatens to devolve into laughable sentimentality. But Green's assured direction and two outstanding lead performances never allow this minor masterpiece to lose its course, and the results are a sumptuous romance that pulsates with the passionate ecstasy of the smitten heart.

Paul (Paul Schneider) is a local guy working for his uncle and living with his mother in the same house he's always called home, and his abundant sexual conquests have earned him a well-deserved reputation as a licentious heartbreaker. He spends his free time with a group of lifelong buddies, drinking and looking for his next female conquest. As one former girlfriend wisely observes, Paul's the type of sleazy good-for-nothing who'll never amount to more than what he is now: a drunken, childish buffoon with no ambition. His mother puts it more bluntly: Paul is "not educated, honest, or strong."

Continue reading: All The Real Girls Review

The Dead Pool Review


OK
The fifth and last of the Dirty Harry movies, The Dead Pool may not be the best in the series, but it's probably the funniest. Thanks to Evan Kim's reluctant "Chinese-American partner," Patricia Clarkson's tough reporter, and Liam Neeson's egomaniacal Brit movie director, The Dead Pool is at least populated with memorable supporting characters. The story -- involving a betting pool involving which San Francisco celebrities are going to die (who then start getting murdered) -- is a bit trite, but at 91 minutes, it doesn't get in the way of lots of old-fashioned shootin'.

Miracle Review


Excellent
You'd have to work extra hard to botch the feel-good story of the underdog U.S.A. hockey team that overcame adversity in the 1980 Olympics and earned an unexpected gold medal. Miracle, which recounts the team's remarkable Olympic run, receives a calculated, polished, and affectionate treatment courtesy of Disney's involvement, but benefits immensely from the casting of relative unknowns in the prime hockey player roles. These actors actually look a lot like kids from Minnesota and Boston. Think how distracting it would be to see Matt Damon as Mike Eruzione or Ashton Kutcher as unflappable goalie Jim Craig.

Miracle's focuses falls heavily on coach Herb Brooks (Kurt Russell), both in how he chooses his players and how he re-trains them to play his way en route to the winter Olympic games in Lake Placid, N.Y. Brooks preaches team chemistry to his players, but it's the cast that catches on. Miracle isn't a movie of individuals, it's the perfect combination of unknown actors and veteran stars.

Continue reading: Miracle Review

Pieces Of April Review


OK
Reviewing Pieces of April brings up a metaphysical question: What do you say about a movie that's not really there? April has several moments of note, quiet, sad bits of truth that feel like they've just come in out of the rain. Pieces, in other words. But writer/director Peter Hedges doesn't give them any larger purpose beyond themselves, and, as a result, his film is a flock of good intentions without somewhere to land.

It's Thanksgiving Day and April Burns (Katie Holmes) has invited her estranged family in from suburban Pennsylvania to her tiny Manhattan apartment for holiday dinner. April shares the flat with her boyfriend Bobby (Derek Luke) a generous partner with sloppy taste in friends. Her parents Jim and Joy (Oliver Platt and Patricia Clarkson) and siblings Beth and Timmy (Alison Pill and John Gallagher Jr.) are less than thrilled about the idea, having given up on April and her new piercing/tattoo/boyfriend lifestyle a long time ago. But Joy is in the advanced stages of a terminal illness. Without saying it too loudly, the family knows that if Mom and April don't at least try to reconcile, later may be too late. Everyone piles into a station wagon and off they go.

Continue reading: Pieces Of April Review

Dogville Review


Good
Evoking the age-old parable of human nature pillaging the likes of total goodness when it strangely pops up in town, Lars von Trier's much-anticipated Dogville has such intense extremes of useful experimentation and annoyingly repetitive patronization (a tendency throughout his respectable filmography) that the sum of its parts comes out evenly average.

Predictability reigns for much of the film, because we've seen the story far too often before. A stranger comes to town where the residents are skeptical of outsiders. She proceeds to go out of her way to ingratiate herself, they finally accept her, and then show their true colors against her of what they fear to inflict on one another due to extended co-habitation. The dysfunction turns into a gang of all versus one, regardless of any normal sense of morality, which they are able to slowly rationalize. On the one hand, the unhurried process through which this evolves respects the fact that nobody changes actions or views over night. But because we know it's going to happen, the path to getting there feels arduous.

Continue reading: Dogville Review

Dogville Review


Weak

Lars von Trier's peculiar compulsion to humiliate his heroines (and by extension the actresses who play them) has finally crescendoed to a deafening din of indiscriminate, exasperating martyrdom in "Dogville," a daring experiment in heightened performance and minimalist filmmaking that is fatally undermined by the Danish writer-director's conceit as a narrator.

His last four movies ("Breaking the Waves," "The Idiots," "Dancer in the Dark" and now "Dogville") have all dealt largely with the psychological (and sometimes physical) torture of vulnerable female protagonists. While his storytelling and cinematic style are almost always compelling, he's never seemed so arbitrary in his sadism than in this allegory of a beautiful, 1930s flapper fugitive hiding from the mob in a ragged, remote, austere Colorado mountain hamlet, where the tiny populace goes from distrustful to accepting to maliciously cruel on little more than von Trier's say-so.

Played with discernible dedication by Nicole Kidman, Grace is a porcelain enigma of self-flagellation so determined to escape some kind of shadowy past that, in exchange for the skeptical township's shelter, she agrees to indentured servitude -- doing handy work, favors and manual labor one hour a day in each of the seven households. She gradually comes earn the friendship of all -- even those most reluctant to accept her.

Continue reading: Dogville Review

The Green Mile Review


Good

"The Green Mile" begins with a little deja vu. Like Tom Hanks' last mid-Century, Oscar-baiting drama, "Saving Private Ryan," it's bookended by a modern framework that finds an old man reluctantly reminiscing about a difficult year of his life, more than half a century ago.

Because of the familiar faces and the similar prestige posturing, this platitudinous structure invites a little eye-rolling as Dabbs Greer (Reverend Alden on "Little House On the Prairie"), playing the aged Hanks, begins to spin what becomes an engrossing three-hour yarn about a year of extraordinary horrors and miracles on death row in a Louisiana state penitentiary.

Hanks plays prison guard Paul Edgecomb, an unjaded joe in charge of death row who treats people on both sides of the bars with humanity and civility. Set in 1935, the central story opens with the arrival of a kindly colossus of a condemned killer named John Coffey (Michael Clarke Duncan).

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

Patricia Clarkson

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Patricia Clarkson Movies

Maze Runner: The Death Cure Trailer

Maze Runner: The Death Cure Trailer

Thomas (Dylan O'Brien) and his fellow Gladers have fought their way out of a Griever-infested...

The Party Movie Review

The Party Movie Review

Comedies don't get much darker than this pitch-black British movie, written and directed by Sally...

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The Scorch Trials Movie Review

The Scorch Trials Movie Review

After the rather lacklustre teen-dystopia adventure The Maze Runner, the action continues in this equally...

Learning To Drive Trailer

Learning To Drive Trailer

Manhattan book critic Wendy is forced to adjust to a dramatic life change when her...

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Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials Trailer

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials Trailer

Having overcome a series of deadly encounters in the box-office smash The Maze Runner, this...

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials - Teaser Trailer

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials - Teaser Trailer

Following their supposed escape from the monster infested maze, the surviving Gladers led by Thomas...

The Maze Runner Movie Review

The Maze Runner Movie Review

There's nothing particularly original or insightful to set this teen-dystopia thriller apart from the crowd,...

The Maze Runner  Trailer

The Maze Runner Trailer

After awakening in a rising elevator with no memory of who he is or what...

The Maze Runner Trailer

The Maze Runner Trailer

Thomas is a young teenager who suddenly awakens to find himself ascending in an elevator...

The East Movie Review

The East Movie Review

Despite a bunch of cold characters and a deeply contrived plot, this film is so...

Friends With Benefits Movie Review

Friends With Benefits Movie Review

A smart, witty script and a likable cast help overcome the deep-seated rom-com cliches the...

One Day Movie Review

One Day Movie Review

Following a relationship on one day a year over more than 20 years is an...

One Day Trailer

One Day Trailer

Emma Morley and Dexter Mayhew meet at Edinburgh University and graduate on July 15th, 1988....

Friends With Benefits Trailer

Friends With Benefits Trailer

Jamie and Dylan are two good friends who both currently find themselves too busy with...

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