Pascal Greggory

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Pascal Greggory and Geraldine Pailhas - Pascal Greggory, Geraldine Pailhas Thursday 20th May 2010 at Cannes Film Festival Cannes, France

Pascal Greggory and Geraldine Pailhas
Pascal Greggory, Geraldine Pailhas and Lodge Kerrigan
Pascal Greggory, Geraldine Pailhas and Lodge Kerrigan
Pascal Greggory

La Vie En Rose Review


Good
The fact that Olivier Dahan's lengthy retread into the life of French chanteuse Edith Piaf has subtitles shouldn't distract you from what's going on. La Vie En Rose, though more stylish in a half-assed, Jeunet-aping sort of way, carbon-copies the DNA of Hollywood musician biopics Ray and Walk the Line and, for better or worse, becomes another in a long line of over-hyped cinematic biographies.

Played by the radiant Marion Cotillard, Piaf rose to stardom as France's most infamous and celebrated singer. Her inebriated bravado and playful demeanor only enlivened her fluid, stunning voice, creating some of the most entertaining and dynamic live performances ever given by a solo vocalist. Rising up with her best friend Momone (a solid Sylvie Testud), Piaf was saved from a youth spent being raised in a bordello when her father couldn't keep things together. Singing on the street, Piaf was finally found by club owner Louis Leplee (the reliably great Gerard Depardieu). From there, Piaf furthered her talents and eventually became the great singer we now know her as.

Continue reading: La Vie En Rose Review

The Page Turner Review


OK
Drained bourgeois chill is so 2001. Denis Dercourt's debut thriller The Page Turner has the ethereal calm of a "Sounds of the Ocean" mix tape and it doesn't seem the least bit interested in disrupting that tone. With its demented psychosexual ramblings and robust flourishes of music, this would-be Chabrol rip-off (without the humor and panache) has a certain charm about it, but that doesn't constitute a successful exercise necessarily.

As a young butcher's daughter, Melanie had talent at the piano. Her father would stay up and listen to her play while saving up enough money to possibly send her off to an academy that deals in gifted pianists. Her audition gets sabotaged when one of the instructors, Ariane Fouchecourt (Catherine Frot), allows an autograph hound into the recital, breaking her concentration. She goes home, locks up her piano, and puts her little Mozart statue in the closet.

Continue reading: The Page Turner Review

Gabrielle Review


Very Good
With fangs still dripping dark blood, Gabrielle comes to us like Neil LaBute rewriting Henrik Ibsen's classic A Doll's House. Don't let that get you too excited: The film is also very slow, psychological, and just slightly experimental in its score and use of text as language. In fact, there's little mystery why the film was held for nearly nine months since its premiere at last years New York Film Festival and Toronto Film Festival.

Jean Hervey (Pascal Greggory) speaks eloquently (in voice over) about his wealth and his friends as he steps off a train and begins his short trek home. He talks at length about his distinguished, attenuated dinners that he throws for friends every Thursday, and then begins to talk about his wife, Gabrielle (Isabelle Huppert). We watch them dine at a huge table of friends, including the editor in charge of Jean's newspaper who spews theory on the decline of theater. Gabrielle talks lovingly of Jean, as if he is the only man deserving of oxygen. Not but a few days later, Jean, still in voice over, is pontificating on how Gabrielle is his "favorite possession" when all of a sudden he finds a letter on his desk. What is disclosed in this letter will cause Jean and Gabrielle to be at each other's throats for the entirety of the film, with both parties drawing a bit of blood.

Continue reading: Gabrielle Review

Gabrielle Review


Very Good
With fangs still dripping dark blood, Gabrielle comes to us like Neil LaBute rewriting Henrik Ibsen's classic A Doll's House. Don't let that get you too excited: The film is also very slow, psychological, and just slightly experimental in its score and use of text as language. In fact, there's little mystery why the film was held for nearly nine months since its premiere at last years New York Film Festival and Toronto Film Festival.

Jean Hervey (Pascal Greggory) speaks eloquently (in voice over) about his wealth and his friends as he steps off a train and begins his short trek home. He talks at length about his distinguished, attenuated dinners that he throws for friends every Thursday, and then begins to talk about his wife, Gabrielle (Isabelle Huppert). We watch them dine at a huge table of friends, including the editor in charge of Jean's newspaper who spews theory on the decline of theater. Gabrielle talks lovingly of Jean, as if he is the only man deserving of oxygen. Not but a few days later, Jean, still in voice over, is pontificating on how Gabrielle is his "favorite possession" when all of a sudden he finds a letter on his desk. What is disclosed in this letter will cause Jean and Gabrielle to be at each other's throats for the entirety of the film, with both parties drawing a bit of blood.

Continue reading: Gabrielle Review

Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train Review


Excellent
The family, friends and lovers all rush to make it to the train. We're thrown into a whirlwind of over a dozen characters all clamoring to get on board, and we soon learn that they are en route to the funeral of the mercurial painter, Jean-Baptiste. This man was a fixture in their lives - a hostile cad with a miserable sense of humor who kept them attached through sex, his vitality for life and encouragement to keep moving forward, whether he meant it or not.

In a boldly theatrical touch, Jean-Baptiste demanded that those gathering to pay their last respects must make a journey by train to his final resting place in Limoges, knowing full well that the damage he has done within their lives will come to a passionate, tumultuous head. As if to mock them, his body is being transported in a small white car driven on the road alongside the tracks.

Continue reading: Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train Review

Time Regained Review


Excellent
A literal adaptation of the final book of Marcel Proust's Remembrances of Things Past would be inconceivable and boring, since the tastes and smells which reveal layers of memory cannot be captured onscreen. Raoul Ruiz's Time Regained does the next best thing. Ruiz weaves a fragmented, experimental narrative in the form of a tapestry. There's an uncanny beauty achieved by telling his story in this manner, which reveals thoughts and inactions by using the very limitations of the film medium. He presents us with a series of photographs, or images shot into mirrors or through doorways which open up to the past and present (and cross-cut between the two with relative ease.)

Taking place within the huge estates and manor houses of the cultural elite, with string quartets playing in their studies and tiny cakes neatly arranged on trays in their kitchens, our main character, Marcel (Marcelo Mazzarello) wanders through this world drinking it in. The plot is inconsequential, it is more about observing the crowded rooms and bitten back emotions, the sips of wine and soft handshakes. Every now and then, Marcel is forced to confront his decadent relatives (sneeringly funny John Malkovich and sour Pascal Greggory.)

Continue reading: Time Regained Review

The Messenger: The Story Of Joan Of Arc Review


OK
Milla J., stick to the singing career.

Luc Besson, imaginative mind behind such notable works of art such as The Professional, La Femme Nikita, and The Big Blue, has created such a memorable mess of things with his newest release, The Messenger. A car crash of a movie headed straight for the Days of Heaven territory.

Continue reading: The Messenger: The Story Of Joan Of Arc Review

Time Regained Review


Bad

For the sake of perspective, this review should begin with a confession: Your critic knows little of Proust. I haven't read any Proust. Most quotes I've heard from the deeply philosophical writer have come from the mouths of people so full of themselves that the words went in one ear and out the other out of disdain for the speaker. I admit it, I'm an ignoramus on this front.

So as you come to realize that I didn't much care for "Time Regained," the French film adaptation of Marcel Proust's last novel, feel free to draw the conclusion that I haven't the slightest idea what I'm talking about.

What little I do know of Proust, however, leads me to believe if the man were alive today he would scoff at the idea that the deliberate formlessness of "Time" could successfully be adapted to film.

Continue reading: Time Regained Review

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Pascal Greggory Movies

La Vie en Rose Movie Review

La Vie en Rose Movie Review

The fact that Olivier Dahan's lengthy retread into the life of French chanteuse Edith Piaf...

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The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc Movie Review

The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc Movie Review

Milla J., stick to the singing career.Luc Besson, imaginative mind behind such notable works of...

Time Regained Movie Review

Time Regained Movie Review

For the sake of perspective, this review should begin with a confession: Your critic knows...

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