Parry Shen

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Parry Shen - General Hospital Fun Luncheon held at Embassy Suites Hotel at Embassy Suites Hotel - Glendale, California, United States - Saturday 8th August 2015

Parry Shen
Parry Shen
Parry Shen

Parry Shen - 'Hatchet 3' premiere at the Egyptian Theatre - Hollywood, CA, United States - Tuesday 11th June 2013

Parry Shen
Parry Shen

The Gene Generation Review


Weak
Here's a three-word phrase that'll get any film critic's blood pumping: "Starring Bai Ling." As an actress who's usually deployed to amp up a film's quotient of exotica and erotica, her presence, sad to say, usually indicates that questionable quality lies ahead. The Gene Generation puts Ling into the tightest leather imaginable, but she still has enough flexibility to do as much machine gun shooting and karate kicking as is required to save a future world from destruction by DNA tampering.

In the dark, Blade Runny dystopia in which Michelle (Ling) lives with her no-good younger brother Jackie (Parry Shen), scientists are toying with a glove-like device that can recombine DNA. In virtuous hands it could cure diseases for good, but in evil hands, it could be weaponized and destroy the world. That's how these things usually go. Let the chase begin.

Continue reading: The Gene Generation Review

Parry Shen, Juan Kohse, Michael Wiles and Robert David Hall - Parry Shen, Juan Kohse, Michael Wiles and Robert David Hall Los Angeles, California - Wizard World at the Los Angeles Convention Center Saturday 15th March 2008

Parry Shen, Juan Kohse, Michael Wiles and Robert David Hall

Hatchet Review


Weak
Touted as the next big thing in horror by everyone from Kane Hodder to Dee Snider, Adam Green's Hatchet comes pre-packaged by the director himself as a return to "Old-School American Horror." What does he mean by "old-school?" The facts that the main dismemberer in Green's film is played by Hodder, the man behind Jason Vorhees, and that Freddy Kruger himself, Robert Englund, makes a cameo in the early minutes of the film give it some street cred in the crowded world of iconic horror (Friday the 13th, A Nightmare on Elm Street).

Green's agenda is to return the horror genre to a lean mixture of gore and humor, as well as reestablishing the notion of horror iconography. His icon is Victor Crowley, a double-decker-sized mutant hillbilly relegated to the swamps of New Orleans. As you might suspect, Victor finds himself in the mood for a festive homicide when a boatload of tourists on a haunted swamp tour get stuck near his burnt-out family shack. Soon enough, Victor begins tossing limbs and torsos every which way while impaling and mutilating any body that has the good fortune of staying in one piece. It becomes the charge of a vengeful girl (Tamara Feldman) and a nerdy so-and-so (Joel Moore) to escape Crowley's clutches, heartbeats intact.

Continue reading: Hatchet Review

Better Luck Tomorrow Review


Excellent
No parents appear in Justin Lin's penetrating debut Better Luck Tomorrow, presumably because their Asian-American kids - seemingly responsible and perfectionist students at the top of their class - have earned the right to nearly limitless freedom. Their absence, however, is persistently felt, as the very freedom these privileged and gifted kids enjoy is also a detrimental form of parental neglect. Left to their own devices, overachievers Ben (Parry Shen), Virgil (Jason J. Tobin), Han (Sung Kang), and Daric (Roger Fan) find that the only outlet for their increasing boredom and rampant egotism is to plunge themselves into a life of financially lucrative and dangerous hustling, theft, and drug dealing. Their cocky gambles turn them into kings of the high school castle, and as their crime spree assumes near mythic proportions - they soon become known as the "Chinese Mafia" - their sense of moral boundaries disappears like the dead body they've buried in a friend's backyard.

Lin's assured and electric tale of good kids gone bad might be just another run-of-the-mill exercise in flashy adolescent nihilism were it not for the cleverly atypical way in which he confronts the material. By setting his film in a nondescript affluent California neighborhood and focusing on Asian-American characters who have their lives totally under control, the director finds a new avenue into the rather tired realm of suburban exposes uncovering the angst and anger lying just beneath the communities' cheery and docile facades. Ben and his friends are, in some respects, stereotypical well-to-do Asian-American students: studious, motivated, passive, and anonymous amidst their predominantly white classmates. Their lives are dominated by the single-minded desire to get into a good college, and they all work furiously at participating in numerous extracurricular activities (working in hospitals, playing on the basketball team, competing on the academic decathlon team) to bolster their college applications. They're like well-oiled machines, robotically tearing through high school as if the only worthwhile goal in life is a perfect GPA and early acceptance to an Ivy League school, and their wholesomeness is humorously alluded to by Lin's use of Jerry Mathers (aka "The Beaver") as Ben's biology teacher.

Continue reading: Better Luck Tomorrow Review

The Hazing Review


Good
Frat boys, sorority girls... tsk tsk. Has the legacy of Scooby-Doo not taught them anything about the perils of breaking into haunted mansions, stealing magical (and evil) books, murdering cult leaders, and getting naked?

Oh well. Their loss is our gain. The Hazing is a monumentally bad horror film, but it's so campy and absurdly gory you can't help but guiltily enjoy your 87-minute stay with it.

Continue reading: The Hazing Review

The New Guy (2002) Review


Terrible
When the screenwriter responsible for one of the worst movies of one year directs an equally miserable film the following year, you'd have a hard time believing it was just coincidence. But Ed Decter, writer of the horribly unfunny Freddie Prinze Jr. clunker Head Over Heels, takes the directing reins for the first time with the remarkably lame teen comedy The New Guy.

The premise is simple: a high school ugly duckling named Dizzy (Road Trip's DJ Qualls) turns it around and starts fresh at a new school, strutting like a badass and making a new personality for himself as a guy named Gil. The supposedly funny twist is that he gets his education in cool while hanging at a prison, taking lessons in toughness from Eddie Griffin (wasted in his short appearance), learning how to dance like a hipster from Horatio Sanz (also wasted), and getting a makeover from the stereotypical cross-dressing cons in the pen. In each scene, Decter and screenwriter David Kendall (big blame goes to him too) want to get right to the funny immediately - the only problem is that each attempt results in a vacant black hole.

Continue reading: The New Guy (2002) Review

The New Guy Review


Weak

For its first 20 minutes or so, the big-geek-on-campus comedy "The New Guy" gets by on a semi-fresh twist of tiresome teen clique themes and a well-cast lead. DJ Qualls -- the 98-lb. walking weakling punchline from 2000's "Road Trip" -- plays a bottom-of-the-food-chain bully magnet who changes high schools and reinvents himself as a wiry, uber-cool bad ass.

But as soon as the kid gets comfortable with his new studly status (insert stock scenes of trampy cheerleaders here) and we've seen Qualls' entire comical cool-jerk repertoire, the movie plum runs out of ideas and putters along on fumes until the closing credits.

Lazy and simplistic, when "The New Guy" isn't beating long-dead genre horses (Qualls feels guilty, for about two minutes, about dissing his "real" friends for the in crowd), it's a blender-edited mish-mosh of abridged plot points. Our hero apparently teaches everyone in his new school to get along, but we don't see how he does it. Before long campus hotties are hanging off the arms of dorks, overweight guys and other former outcasts. No explanation there either. Qualls' dad (Lyle Lovett) and former school counselor (Illeana Douglas) think his new style and attitude are signs of a drug problem, but that story angle is abandoned after about 30 seconds.

Continue reading: The New Guy Review

Parry Shen

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Parry Shen Movies

Hatchet Movie Review

Hatchet Movie Review

Touted as the next big thing in horror by everyone from Kane Hodder to Dee...

Better Luck Tomorrow Movie Review

Better Luck Tomorrow Movie Review

No parents appear in Justin Lin's penetrating debut Better Luck Tomorrow, presumably because their Asian-American...

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The New Guy (2002) Movie Review

The New Guy (2002) Movie Review

When the screenwriter responsible for one of the worst movies of one year directs an...

The New Guy Movie Review

The New Guy Movie Review

For its first 20 minutes or so, the big-geek-on-campus comedy "The New Guy" gets by...

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