Park Chan-wook

Park Chan-wook

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Stoker Trailer


India Stoker is a reclusive young artist with no friends at school due to her many peculiarities and idiosyncrasies. Her only friend is her father, and when he dies in a unexplained car accident she finds herself even more isolated as she is forced to stay with her unhinged mother Evie who shows her nothing but contempt. It isn't long before the mother and daughter are joined by India's uncle Charlie; a man whom India has never been told about before despite him being the brother of her beloved father. He is handsome, charming and mysterious and Evie wastes no time in falling in love with him - seeing him as a blessing since the death of her husband. Her contempt for her daughter increases, however, when she finds that Charlie has become much more interested in India and, although she initially suspects him of having dubious intentions, the interest is soon reciprocated when she becomes infatuated with his sinister games.

'Stoker' is a psychological thriller with a star studded cast directed by Chan-wook Park ('Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance', 'Oldboy') and written by first-time screenwriter Wentworth with additions from Erin Cressida Wilson ('Secretary', 'Chloe'). It is set for release in the UK on March 1st 2013. 

Director: Park Chan-wook

Continue: Stoker Trailer

Stoker Trailer


India Stoker is a plain young artist whose peculiarities isolate her from others in high school leaving her friendless. When her loving father dies in unknown circumstances after a car accident, she is forced to remain with her cold, unloving and unhinged mother Evelyn. Soon, however, India is introduced to her handsome and charming Uncle Charlie - someone who she has never before been told existed. Evelyn falls for him and attempts to have him fill the place of her deceased husband, however he seems less interested in her and more interested in India. India suspects him of having a dark motive for coming to live to them but instead of fearing him, she begins an increasing obsession for him that he in turn reciprocates. 

This psychological thriller features stunning acting performances from an award-winning star studded cast that is bound to pull you to edge of your seat next Spring. Directed by Chan-wook Park ('Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance', 'Oldboy') and written by first-time screenwriter Wentworth with contributions from Erin Cressida Wilson ('Secretary', 'Chloe'), 'Stoker' is a story of corruption, vengeance and bloodlust with a hint of illicit romance. It will be released in across the UK from March 1st 2013 by Fox Searchlight UK.

Starring:Nicole Kidman, Mia Wasikowska, Matthew Goode & Lucas Till.

Continue: Stoker Trailer

Thirst Review


Good
Besides the vampires, this is an oddly faithful adaptation of Emile Zola's novel Therese Raquin. Filmmaker Park directs with his usual eye-catching skill and attention to gruesome detail, and creates a story with strong emotional resonance.

Priest Sang-hyeon (Song Kang-ho) voluntarily enters an African monastery to help research a deadly disease. But the mysterious illness leaves him craving human blood. He finds peaceful solutions to this, but things get complicated when he meets the sparky Tae-joo (Kim Ok-vin), who he's known since childhood in the orphanage. She's still living with her adoptive mother (Kim Hae-sook), and is now married to her adoptive brother Kang-woo (Shin). When they plot to kill Kang-woo so they can be together, this is only their first step across the line to inhumanity.

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Lady Vengeance Review


Excellent
Never to be labeled a sexist, Korean firebrand Park Chan-wook delivers the third installment in his exceptional Vengeance Cycle, Lady Vengeance, with the unmistakable whiff of feminine ardor. Not only does this film add a breezier, comical tone that neither Oldboy nor Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance had, but it's his most stylistic and broad film to date.

It starts with the release of Lady Vengeance aka Lee Geum-Ja (Yeong-ae Lee) from prison. She was set up for the kidnapping and murder of a young child when she was 19, fearing the real murderer would kill her young daughter. Well, now she's out, and heaven knows what was sowed is going to be reaped. Lady Vengeance sets up an elaborate plan to get revenge for her and all the families of the kids who were killed by Mr. Baek (Choi Min-Sik), an elementary school teacher. She uses every contact she has made in and outside of prison to set up a good life and a good way to avenge the children who were murdered.

Continue reading: Lady Vengeance Review

Oldboy Review


Extraordinary
What can you say about a movie that has not one, not two, but three scenes of improvised oral surgery that make Laurence Olivier's bit in Marathon Man look like Steve Martin's bit in Little Shop of Horrors? For starters, you can say that that's really not the most disturbing thing this Korean import has to offer. Oldboy, as it turns out, is not interested in grossing us out, though not for a lack of trying. It's much more interested in playing with the conventions of the revenge fantasy and taking us on a very entertaining ride to places that, conceptually, we might not want to go.

The film begins with the first of many feints that play with our assumptions. A skinny, unkempt man holds another over the side of a building by his tie. Flash back to a fat, clean-shaven man named Oh Dae-su (Min-sik Choi) acting drunk and disorderly in a police station (in a truly Raging Bull-esque effort on Choi's part, we have no clue that this will become the man holding the tie). He isn't out for five minutes before he suddenly disappears. Next thing he knows, he's in what looks like a hotel room, being fed through a slot in a metal door and being gassed on a regular basis. This goes on for 15 years.

Continue reading: Oldboy Review

Sympathy for Lady Vengeance Review


Excellent
Never to be labeled a sexist, Korean firebrand Park Chan-wook delivers the third installment in his exceptional Vengeance Cycle, Sympathy for Lady Vengeance, with the unmistakable whiff of feminine ardor. Not only does this film add a breezier, comical tone that neither Oldboy nor Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance had, but it's his most stylistic and broad film to date.

It starts with the release of Lady Vengeance aka Lee Geum-Ja (Yeong-ae Lee) from prison. She was set up for the kidnapping and murder of a young child when she was 19, fearing the real murderer would kill her young daughter. Well, now she's out, and heaven knows what was sowed is going to be reaped. Lady Vengeance sets up an elaborate plan to get revenge for her and all the families of the kids who were killed by Mr. Baek (Choi Min-Sik), an elementary school teacher. She uses every contact she has made in and outside of prison to set up a good life and a good way to avenge the children who were murdered.

Continue reading: Sympathy for Lady Vengeance Review

Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance Review


Grim
Cruelty and murder beget more of the same in Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, Park Chan-wook's torturously shallow and unpleasant meditation on the never-ending circle of violence. The first installment of the acclaimed Korean filmmaker's "revenge trilogy" which also includes last year's critically over-praised Oldboy, Park's latest - originally shot in 2002, but only now receiving a stateside release - is a multilayered payback saga in which characters search for satisfaction and salvation via bloodshed. Sleepy-eyed protagonist Ryu's (Shin Ha-kyun) condition as a deaf-mute epitomizes the director's depiction of retribution as a byproduct of people's inability to rationally, and empathetically, communicate with one another. Except, unfortunately, that the all-sizzle, no-substance filmmaker is far less interested in the way brutality engenders more brutality (or in any other meaningful philosophical or moral issues, for that matter) than he is in chic shock and gore. And consequently, his portrayal of rampant viciousness amounts to little more than a miasma of gratuitous gruesomeness that attempts to assume a cynical worldview but instead comes off as simply an immaturely titillating and horrifying exercise in stylish ugliness.

Fired from his job on the eve of having to pay for his sister's kidney transplant, Ryu turns to black market organ peddlers, an unwise decision that leaves him penniless, kidney-less and desperate for a means to save his beloved sibling. With the help of a radical terrorist girlfriend (Bae Du-na) who spends her days passing out pamphlets on the street while advising passersby to "Drive out the American products" and "No U.S. Army," Ryu decides to kidnap the young daughter (Han Bo-bae) of his callous fatcat former boss (Song Kang-ho), and Park posits their abduction as an act of class warfare orchestrated by the downtrodden working class against the wealthy urban elite. Profound cultural commentary, however, isn't in the cards, with the hectic, convoluted action quickly devolving into a spectacle of simple-minded, slogan-heavy pontificating and abject ghastliness characterized by suicide, self-mutilation, a foursome of teenage boys aggressively self-gratifying themselves, close-ups of slit throats and Achilles tendons, and - in the film's most unrealistic, offensive, and pointlessly dreadful moment - a grieving father forced to watch his recently drowned daughter get sliced open on an autopsy table.

Continue reading: Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance Review

Park Chan-wook

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