Bad Religion

Bad Religion - with support from Emanuel (Manchester Academy 2, 23/08/2005) - Live Review

Bad Religion - with support from Emanuel (Manchester Academy 2, 23/08/2005) - Live Review
Bad Religion
with support from Emanuel
(Manchester Academy 2, 23/08/2005)

Searing emo punk ignited the start of some vigorous bouncing from the front few rows, bringing to mind Funeral For A Friend sharing a dodgems course at the fair with Coheed And Cambria and Moneen. Emanuel’s set stuttered early on due to the failing of a rented amp,when the lead guitarist was forced to engage the crowd in banter about football and proudly pledged allegiance to the Indianapolis Colts. The Louisville/Kentucky outfit soon started motoring and were as potent as their hero Payton Manning. The fiery and resonant ‘The New Violence’ that exuded the belief and insurrection of tonight’s headliner’s, ensured that this outfit will be welcome back anytime into the musical metropolis ofManchester.

Dyed-in-the-wool South Californian punks Bad Religion bounded on to stage with the enthusiasm of a band playing their first gig,launching into a range of material spanning their fervent and lengthy career. Vocalist Greg Griffin had the poise, passion and belief of a protest rally speaker; slicing into an extensive set with the cutting old school punk number; ‘Sinister Rouge’ that saw people frantically surge forward, as though the first one to the front won a place in the Big Brother house. Griffin’s vocals have lost on of its deep throated angst; he went from one classic to another without a break early on.

Eleven years on since its release and the classic ‘21st Century (Digital Boy)’ still ignitedtrue punk spirit in the crowd, when defiance was in the air and the band demonstrated enthusiasm and the timeless nature of their vociferous outbursts. 2002’s resurgent offering ‘The Process Of Belief’ was relied upon to fan the flames of the buoyantevening, with the feisty ‘Supersonic’ and the regretful ‘Sorrow’ cementing the album’s popularity. Griffin took time to decry his hatred for jocks or sporty types as they are commonly known;naming them as the subject matter forthe biting and fiery guitar propelled; ‘Recipe For Hate'. Griffin seemed toevoke great deal of empathy from the adoring crowd for his views.

An invigorating evening from one of punk's most accomplished revivers had been completed with integrity and grit. Tonight, Bad Religion showed why they would be clearly up there with the acts of the late 70s, should a punk hall of fame be compiled; now, there’s an idea!

www.badreligion.com

www.thisisemanuel.com

David Adair