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Vince Vaughn & Owen Wilson Have A Job On Winning People Over In The Internship: Review Round-Up


Vince Vaughn Owen Wilson

Vince Vaughn stars and writes the new comedy The Internship, bringing in the often used help of Owen Wilson to co-star and co-writer Jared Stern (Wreck-It Ralph,The Watch) with him for buddy comedy. Bringing in the help of fellow light-hearted comedy veteran Shawn Levy (Night At The Museum) to direct, the film finds two recently unemployed, down on their luck average Joe's (Vaughn and Wilson), whose lives it seems have been made redundant by the digital age. Some how though (it's a movie) the pair manage to talk their way into a job a Google each; and soon realise how out of their depth they are. Don't worry though, because with their infinite wisdom of partying, the boys soon make friends.

Watch the trailer for The Internship

Continue reading: Vince Vaughn & Owen Wilson Have A Job On Winning People Over In The Internship: Review Round-Up

'The Internship' Reviews – Sorry Guys, This Job's Not For You


Vince Vaughn Owen Wilson

This is how internships go: you slog away unpaid for a few weeks until, hopefully, the boss turns around and hands you a contract. The Internship slogs away for a couple hours and no one’s offering Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson a salary.

Watch Vince and Owen chat about The Internship

The critics haven’t taken kindly to the comedy pair’s attempt to shed light on the modern phenomenon that is an internship. This is a shame, as it’s a story that needs telling. Thousands of hungry job-seekers turn to internships – an attempt to wow a company by literally working for free – to secure full time employment. “The polar opposite of The Social Network, say RedEye in their review, “depicting innovation and intelligence as if they're merely the fruits of ideas burped out by an aging slacker who doesn't know when to shut up.” USA Today joked: “Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson may be the worst interns since Monica Lewinsky,” while The New York Post say, “Director Shawn Levy's work has, as always, all the edge of a tub of margarine - he's the guy who did "Night at the Museum." And "The Internship" has the air of a promotional video for Google.”

Continue reading: 'The Internship' Reviews – Sorry Guys, This Job's Not For You

Video - Owen Wilson And Vince Vaughn Talk Google Paradise And The Realities Of Their New Movie 'The Internship' In An Interview


'Wedding Crashers' stars Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn discuss their new movie 'The Internship' in an interview. They talk about how their movie is relatable, what it was like filming at Google Headquarters and their own internship experiences.

Continue: Video - Owen Wilson And Vince Vaughn Talk Google Paradise And The Realities Of Their New Movie 'The Internship' In An Interview

Video - Vince Vaughn And Owen Wilson Get Excited For The Premiere Of 'The Internship'


A thrilled looking Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson arrive in their car at the premiere of their new comedy movie 'The Internship' in Westwood, California. They sign autographs for fans as they reach the red carpet and look to be particularly enjoying themselves as they make their way over to the photo area.

Continue: Video - Vince Vaughn And Owen Wilson Get Excited For The Premiere Of 'The Internship'

The Internship - Clip


Former salesmen Billy and Nick are left unemployed after the owner of the company that they work for decides to become an internet only business rendering their door-to-door techniques obsolete. In a bid to get back on the career ladder, Billy manages to land them an online, webcam interview with internet giant Google which, admittedly, could've gone better. After initially establishing themselves as illiterate in the way of computers by shouting at their potential employers through a machine at a public library, they managed to cause them great alarm, not to mention confusion, with an animated description of what they would do if they were shrunk to the size of a nickel and placed in a blender. An odd question for a job interview, but possibly not one this wacky duo haven't thought about before.

Continue: The Internship - Clip

CinemaCon Big Screen Achievement Award Winners Take To The Red Carpet [Photos]


Owen Wilson Vince Vaughn Melissa McCarthy Asa Butterfield Harrison Ford Hailee Steinfeld Chris Pine Morgan Freeman Armie Hammer Aubrey Plaza Elizabeth Banks Joseph Gordon-Levitt Justin Lin

Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson at CinemaCon Big Screen Achievement Awards
Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson at CinemaCon Big Screen Achievement Awards

The honourees at this CinemaCon Big Screen Achievement Awards proudly displayed their accolades on the red carpet at Caesars Palace on April 18th 2013.

This year twelve phenomenal actors and directors were awarded at the Las Vegas resort and casino as CinemaCon came to a close this week. Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson landed Comedy Duo of the Year as they are set to reunite for the first time since 2005's 'Wedding Crashers' in 'The Internship'. Melissa McCarthy won Female Star of the Year after being hilarious in 'Identity Thief', while young Asa Butterfield who is set to star in 'Ender's Game' later this year won Rising Star of 2013. His co-star, Harrison Ford, was honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award while his other co-star Hailee Steinfeld was given an award dubbing her Female Star of Tomorrow as she takes on leading roles in 'Romeo and Juliet' and 'Can a Song Save Your Life?' this year. Male Star of the Year went to Chris Pine with the upcoming release of 'Star Trek Into Darkness', 'Oblivion' star Morgan Freeman won Cinema Icon Award and Armie Hammer became Male Star of Tomorrow as he takes on the lead role in 'The Lone Ranger'. Other actresses to land awards were Aubrey Plaza with Breakthrough Performer of the Year as she is set to appear in 'The To Do List' and Elizabeth Banks from 'The Hunger Games' who won an Award of Excellence in Acting.

Continue reading: CinemaCon Big Screen Achievement Award Winners Take To The Red Carpet [Photos]

A Week In Movies Featuring The Oscars Favourites, Owen Wilson And Vince Vaughn Crashing Google And Danny Boyle's Gory Trailer For Trance


Amanda Seyfried Jennifer Lawrence Ben Affleck Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences Owen Wilson Vince Vaughn Pierce Brosnan Trine Dyrholm Danny Boyle James McAvoy

Amanda Seyfried 'Les Miserables' Premiere Berlin Germany

It's Oscar weekend, so the stars are converging on Los Angeles for the big night on Sunday. Returning from the premiere of her new film Lovelace at the Berlin Film Festival, Amanda Seyfried was caught by the paparazzi as she landed at the airport to support Les Miserables, which has seven nominations including Best Picture. She signed autographs as she was ushered through the arrivals hall by her aggressive security team.

The press also caught up with Jennifer Lawrence as she made her way through the Los Angeles airport. She's the favourite to win Best Actress for her role in Silver Linings Playbook and was also rushed through the arrivals hall while photographers snapped pictures. She managed to sign a few autographs along the way, and one of her minders can be seen putting her luggage in the back of her car, including a teddy bear.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies Featuring The Oscars Favourites, Owen Wilson And Vince Vaughn Crashing Google And Danny Boyle's Gory Trailer For Trance

The Internship: Are Vince Vaughn And Owen Wilson Googling A Hit? (Trailer)


Owen Wilson Vince Vaughn

Perennial funny guys Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson are back with another comedy, this time making light of internships and the ‘wacky’ Google offices, in which some of the film was shot.

For most, the Google offices are a mystery, so filming inside them was a real treat for Vaughn. He says: "Being from the Midwest, Google always felt like The Wizard Of Oz or the Chocolate Factory (in Charlie And The Chocolate Factory). It's such a different type of place to work at than what is considered a traditional work environment. With the... access to food, the sports on campus, the massages and all that stuff."

Continue reading: The Internship: Are Vince Vaughn And Owen Wilson Googling A Hit? (Trailer)

Google Search: Generational Clash; New Trailer For Owen Wilson And Vince Vaughn's The Internship Released


Owen Wilson Vince Vaughn

It’s a safe if uninspiring partnership: Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn are back together as co-stars in new movie The Internship, which debuted its first trailer earlier this week. We all remember the pair’s previous jaunt together, as cheeky guys out to get laid at weddings in The Wedding Crashers, and we wouldn’t expect the humour for The Internship to be too much different from that run out in 2005.

The plot stars the pair as salesmen Billy and Nick, whose careers are struggling with the digital world dominating sales. In order to prove to themselves that they’re not obsolete, the pair manage to get themselves onto an internship at Google where, playing their usual dopey, slightly slacker selves, they come up against some of the finest college minds in the USA. I know, larks right? The trailer certainly suggests it, with John Goodman also making an appearance as the boss of their failing company.

From the trailer it looks like a classic case of two generations colliding, with the tech-savvy college kids giving the 80’s film referencing Vaughn and Wilson the run-around. However, if we know how these films usually pan out – and we think we do – we reckon that the ageing salesmen might just have the last laugh. See for yourself below, the film is out in cinemas on June 7, 2013.

Continue reading: Google Search: Generational Clash; New Trailer For Owen Wilson And Vince Vaughn's The Internship Released

Video - P. Diddy And Will Ferrell Spotted Dressed Down At A Miami Art Show


Various famous faces were spotted at the Miami Beach Art Basel; it was the 11th edition of the show that is considered the most prestigious art show in America.

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Cars 2 Review


Good
There's an astounding level of detail in the animation of this sequel to Pixar's iffy 2006 hit Cars. It's good fun but, with so many characters and plot strands, it also feels cluttered and rather chaotic.

Global daredevil Axelrod (Izzard) has challenged the world's fastest cars to a three-part grand prix, so rally champ McQueen (Wilson) heads to Tokyo with his pal Mater (Larry) to take on rival F1 racer Francesco (Turturro). But Mater obliviously stumbles into a sinister international espionage operation, mistaken for a spy by British agents Finn and Holly (Caine and Mortimer). As the competition continues to the Italian Riviera and London, McQueen frets that he has insulted Mater. But he's actually entangled in a mission to stop a mysterious villain from blowing up the racers.

Continue reading: Cars 2 Review

Hall Pass Review


Very Good
The Farrelly brothers once again combine raucous humour, outrageous vulgarity and genuinely heartfelt comedy for this surprisingly involving story about rediscovering the spark in marriage.

Rick and Fred (Wilson and Sudeikis) are best pals who have never quite given up their frat-boy ways, even though both are settled down with their wives Maggie and Grace (Fischer and Applegate), respectively. Fed up with their obsessions with sex, the women give their husbands hall passes: a week off from marriage, no questions asked. But things have changed since they were 20-year-old bucks, both in the world and in their priorities. Is it as much fun to actually go girl-crazy as it is to pretend to do it?

Continue reading: Hall Pass Review

Hall Pass Trailer


One week of freedom, no questions asked with no repercussions. Fred and Rick are best friends who have both just been granted the same deal by their wives - a week off their marriages.

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Owen Wilson Sunday 27th February 2011 The Australian premiere of 'Hall Pass' held at the Entertainment Quarter - Arrivals Sydney, Australia

Owen Wilson
Owen Wilson

How Do You Know Review


Good

Brooks is back with another warm, smart romance along the lines of As Good As It Gets. The snappy characters are well-played by a strong cast, which makes it steadily entertaining even if it's not hugely believable.

Professional softball player Lisa (Witherspoon) and businessman Paul (Rudd) are strangers who are set up on a blind date by a mutual friend. But they discount the possibility of even meeting because Paul has become serious with his girlfriend (Conn) and Lisa is seeing a star baseball player (Wilson). Then their lives both take a turn. Lisa is cut from her team, and Paul becomes the target of a Federal investigation into the business he runs for his father (Nicholson). As their paths keep crossing, they begin to see each other in a different light.

As usual, Brooks writes extremely clever dialog that blends brainy sassiness and emotional resonance, and the film is packed with scenes in which characters have all kinds of lucid insight into the nature or relationships, usually in contrast to someone who's extremely clueless. The formula is a bit of a strain, but it keeps us engaged, mainly because the script crackles with hilariously incisive one-liners and comical gags.

And the cast members all play their roles as if they're sliding into comfy slippers. Witherspoon and Wilson are funny and laid back as well as effortlessly astute and oblivious, respectively. Rudd is breezy and adorable even as his life is flooded with sadness. Nicholson squirms a bit in an against-type role but comes up with some fine comical moments. And everyone is hugely likeable, even when two of them do rather nasty things to the other two.

Although actually they only think nasty thoughts, because the film never gets very down and dirty about the story's dark corners. It's one of those films that skims happily across the surface while making pointed observations that catch us off guard because they seem to reveal something about the nature of relationships. This leaves us feeling warm and thoughtful, even if the film ultimately fades from memory in about the time it takes for the lights to come up in the cinema.

Owen Wilson Wednesday 15th December 2010

Owen Wilson

Owen Wilson Monday 13th December 2010

Owen Wilson

How Do You Know Trailer


Since being cut from the USA softball team Lisa hasn't been having the best time of it, her relationship with her professional baseball pitcher boyfriend isn't as strong as she'd like and there's not much else going on in her life; until she meets George in a lift, George is instantly infatuated with the beautiful Lisa and so begins a love triangle, but who'll win out? The business man in the middle of a crisis or the baseball player?

Continue: How Do You Know Trailer

Little Fockers Review


Weak
While this second sequel to Meet the Parents features the same comedy of embarrassment and vulgarity as its predecessors, it also takes a strange sideways step into machismo that leaves it feeling rather joyless.

As their twins (Daisy Tahan and Colin Baiocchi) are about to turn 5, Greg and Pam Focker (Stiller and Polo) are planning a big birthday party involving both of their sets of parents. While Pam's intense dad Jack (De Niro) is pressuring Greg to be a family leader, her mom (Danner) tries to keep the peace.

Meanwhile, Greg's parents (Streisand and Hoffman) are on separate quests of their own. But it's Pam's ex Kevin (Wilson) who really stirs things up. As does a drug rep (Alba) who gets a bit too close to Greg.

Continue reading: Little Fockers Review

Paul Rudd and Owen Wilson - Paul Rudd and Owen Wilson Los Angeles, California - The Premiere of 'How Do You Know' held at Regency Village Theatre - Arrivals Monday 13th December 2010

Paul Rudd and Owen Wilson
Paul Rudd
Paul Rudd
Paul Rudd
Paul Rudd
Paul Rudd and Owen Wilson

Cars 2 Trailer


Lightning McQueen knows he's the best and fastest race car in the world and when he hears about the first-ever World Grand Prix he decides he must enter. Along with his best friend Mater the tow truck they start their journey overseas.

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Meet The Parents Little Fockers Trailer


Our favourite dysfunctional family returns to the screens once again in Meet The Parents Little Fockers. It's 10 years on since Greg and Jack first met, and after finally marrying his daughter and raising two children with her, Jack seems to finally be accepting Greg for who he is; however it doesn't seem Jack's ever going to be 100% happy with his son-in-law, when he finds out Greg is short on money and working for a drug company Jack becomes dubious about Greg and if he'll ever be a strong enough man to lead his family.

Continue: Meet The Parents Little Fockers Trailer

Marmaduke Trailer


Marmaduke is perhaps the world's most famous Great Dane, he was originally brought to life in a newspaper comic strip drawn in the 1950's by Brad Anderson. Now Marmaduke is set to make his motion picture debut. When the Winslow family (along with Marmaduke and their cat Carlos) make a move to LA, Marmaduke pictures the perfect life from now on, after all - LA is home to some of the best dog parks in the world! However, when he arrives, the parks are great but how could any dog from outside LA deal with all the rivalry between Mutts vs. Pedigrees! It might take Marmaduke a little longer to find his 'pawing' than he first thought.

Continue: Marmaduke Trailer

Fantastic Mr Fox Review


Very Good
This is much more of a Wes Anderson film than the Roald Dahl classic on which it's based. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but it could cause problems with fans of the book. The central themes are still there, but this is essentially a quirky dysfunctional family romp.

Mr Fox (voiced by Clooney) has a pretty fantastic life as a newspaper columnist living in his den with his wife (Streep), surly teen son Ash (Schwartzman) and visiting nephew Kristofferson (Anderson). After Fox convinces his wife to move aboveground to a tree, he becomes tempted to go back to his bird-stealing ways.

And with his possum pal Kylie (Wolodarsky), he goes on a spree that enrages the local farmers, led by the furious Bean (Gambon), who vows revenge. But this puts the entire local animal population in danger.

Continue reading: Fantastic Mr Fox Review

Owen Wilson Tuesday 18th August 2009 on the set of his new film 'Untitled James L. Brooks Project' shooting on location Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Owen Wilson
Owen Wilson
Owen Wilson

Night At The Museum: Battle Of The Smithsonian Review


Weak
Shawn Levy has no soul. Perhaps put another way, he is one of the few filmmakers working today who lacks the requisite motion picture magic to make his fantastical ideas sing. Now that's nothing new to anyone who's seen his hamfisted hackwork in such incoherent remake comedies as Cheaper by the Dozen and The Pink Panther. He's also the Nachos, Flanders Style of visionaries, unable to bring a lick of wonder to his tedious kid flick Night at the Museum. Now he's back with another baffling, sure-to-be crowd pleaser, and while Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian has much better effects than the prior outing, the story -- and some of the casting -- seems geared toward destroying any amount of visual goodwill accrued.

It's been a few years since Larry Daley (Ben Stiller) worked as a night watchman at the Museum of Natural History in New York. He has since become a highly successful infomercial pitchman. When he learns from the statue of Teddy Roosevelt (Robin Williams) that most of his favorite exhibits, including the miniatures of cowboy Jedediah Smith (Owen Wilson) and Roman Emperor Octavius (Steve Coogan), are being "decommissioned" and taken to the Federal Archive in DC, he's sad. A late night phone call from his "friends" has him headed to the nation's capital and breaking into the Smithsonian. There, he discovers Kahmunrah (Hank Azaria), evil brother of Ahkmenrah (Rami Malek), who wants a fabled golden tablet so he can take over the world. With the help of Gen. Custer (Bill Hader) and Amelia Earhart (Amy Adams), Larry must stop the resurrected despot and save the day.

Continue reading: Night At The Museum: Battle Of The Smithsonian Review

Marley & Me Review


Bad
Animal films are critical landmines. Step wrong, opinion-wise, and readers will accuse you of being everything from heartless and insensitive to PETA's public enemy number one. Clearly, Old Yeller and other four-footed tearjerkers have made canines the noblest of our beloved domesticated friends. After topping the bestseller's list with his autobiographical memoir Marley and Me, journalist John Grogan is seeing his tale of the world's worst pooch finally make it to the big screen -- and it's time to get out the tar and feathers. Instead of being uplifting and heartwarming, this excruciating effort is 90 minutes of mediocrity followed by 10 minutes of the most manipulative, mean-spirited pap ever put into a movie made for families.

When they get married, reporters John Grogan (Owen Wilson) and his new bride Jenny (Jennifer Aniston) picture themselves setting the Fourth Estate on fire. Eventually, they end up in South Florida where she handles hot button political and social stories. He, on the other hand, is relegated to writing about building fires and lame local oddities. When his sourpuss editor (Alan Arkin) offers him a column, John is unsure what to do. Taking inspiration from the new dog named Marley he just adopted, our scribe is soon scribbling stories about how this cute-as-a-button Labrador retriever is evil incarnate. Labeled "the world's worst dog," Marley lives up to the title. Even as the Grogans grow older and raise a family, they still don't know what to do with their destructive hound from Hell.

Continue reading: Marley & Me Review

Drillbit Taylor Review


Very Good
A cleverly placed cameo early on in Drillbit Taylor reveals that the filmmakers are keenly aware of the territory in which they tread. It's a reference to the 1980 film My Bodyguard, in which a bullied teen hires a loner to get his back. But where that film went for the more poignant, coming of age vibe, this film is much more interested in making you laugh. More often than not, it succeeds.

Wade (Nate Hartley) and Ryan (Troy Gentile) are nervous about the first day of high school. They should be. No sooner do they arrive, inadvertently wearing the same shirt, than Wade's attempts to protect one diminutive student (David Dorfman, who's grown maybe two inches since playing Naomi Watts' son in The Ring) from the school bullies (Alex Frost and Josh Peck) land them on said bullies' crap list.

Continue reading: Drillbit Taylor Review

The Darjeeling Limited Review


Excellent
It was a boarding school in Rushmore, a gorgeous city home in The Royal Tenenbaums, and a grand oceanic vessel in The Life Aquatic; Wes Anderson has a jones for condensed spaces. In The Darjeeling Limited, it's a luxurious locomotive rolling through the sublime terrain of Darjeeling, India. Stowed away amongst the German tourists and the toppling luggage are the Whitman Brothers (Jack, Francis, and Peter), a gang of American buffoons trying to find enlightenment, salvation, and relief amidst the sand dunes.

The eldest Whitman brother, Francis (Owen Wilson), found time for an epiphany as he lay on the ground after a motorcycle accident, leaving to wonder why his younger brothers weren't with him. His remedy consists of a brotherly train trip accompanied by a surprise visit to their estranged mother's parish. Don't worry: There's a laminated itinerary if you get confused. The youngest, Jack (Anderson staple Jason Schwartzman), comes aboard to shed the skin of his ex-girlfriend while Peter (Anderson newbie Adrien Brody), the middle brother, has begun feeling desperation over his impending fatherhood. Moreover, they are digging and scratching at every surface to hide the grief over their father's passing; the event that caused their initial scattering.

Continue reading: The Darjeeling Limited Review

The Darjeeling Limited Trailer


Director Wes Anderson brings us, The Darjeeling Limited, starring Owen Wilson, Adrien Brody and Jason Schwartzman, is an emotional comedy about three brothers re-forging family bonds. The eldest, played by Wilson, hopes to reconnect with his two younger siblings by taking them on a train trip across the vibrant and sensual landscape of India. 

Continue: The Darjeeling Limited Trailer

The Wendell Baker Story Review


Weak
Oh, the world is one sweet nectarine to the boys in the frat pack. While Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn, and Will Ferrell owned the summer with Wedding Crashers, Owen Wilson was filming You, Me and Dupree with Kate Hudson and Matt Dillon (hit!) and Vince Vaughn was filming The Break-Up with Jennifer Aniston (again: hit!). While all this was happening, the group's indelible straight man, Luke Wilson, was busy peddling around his writing/co-directing/acting venture, The Wendell Baker Story. Even though 3 members of the frat pack make appearances in the film, there's something not quite "fratty" about The Wendell Baker Story.

Wendell Baker (Luke Wilson) has charm oozing from his pores but can't do much more than make friends with it. He makes fake IDs with his friend, Reyes (Jacob Vargas), for illegal aliens that just jumped the fence. Wendell also has a woman who loves him, but of course, he can't tell her he loves her back. That girl is Doreen (Eva Mendes), who runs into the arms of a grocery store owner (Ferrell) when Wendell gets sent away. When he returns, settled on getting his life straight and winning Doreen back. He is set up to work in an old folk's home, ample for his dreams of owning his own hotel one day. Trouble comes when he uncovers a scheme to fake old people's death and actually send them away to be slaves at a small farm house, owned by the mother of Neil King (Owen Wilson), the head nurse and a supreme sleaze bag. With the help of three wily retirees (Seymour Cassel, Harry Dean Stanton, and Kris Kristofferson), Wendell plans to win back the girl and uncover the scheme.

Continue reading: The Wendell Baker Story Review

You, Me And Dupree Review


Terrible
Entertainment gossip trackers shamelessly debate an actor's chosen sexuality in much the same way that baseball fans discuss a player's stats. Is he gay? Is she bisexual? Some even make broad assumptions that everyone in Hollywood bats for the proverbial "other team."

Such a proclamation borders on absurd, and yet it's becoming more difficult to entirely refute the claim. This year, Ang Lee's Brokeback Mountain earned sweeping critical praise and a handful of Oscar nominations, losing a tight Best Picture race to Crash. Even during the summer, when audiences typically are lured to theaters by testosterone-soaked summer blockbusters, it's Johnny Depp's fey, ambiguous, and decidedly swishy Capt. Jack Sparrow who has sailed to the front of the box-office pack.

Continue reading: You, Me And Dupree Review

Cars Review


Very Good

Almost every major sport has a companion film, the one movie fans routinely point to as the definitive representation of their beloved competitive activity. Basketball has Hoosiers. Baseball divides camps between The Natural and Bull Durham. Hockey (Slap Shot) and soccer (Victory) are covered, while football actually has too many to mention.

But prior to 2006, NASCAR was without a representative - and don't even think about suggesting Tony Scott's dreadful Days of Thunder. Racing legend Richard Petty put that crazed notion to rest when he recently told a crowd of entertainment journalists, "The only thing that Days of Thunder had to do with racing was that they had numbers on the side of the car."

Continue reading: Cars Review

Starsky & Hutch Review


Excellent
How gratifying to laugh at a movie starring Ben Stiller again. Not just occasional chuckles, as in Duplex or Along Came Polly, but big, genuine, generous laughs. A solid, well-timed comedy can be such a relief; Starsky & Hutch is no more than that, but that's part of its charm.

This charm may not be entirely expected. After all, it is (1) an adaptation of a 1970s cop show, (2) arriving maybe a decade after the peak of seventies nostalgia, (3) assembled by director-writer Todd Phillips (Road Trip, Old School), whose previous movies were only funny to the extent that the actors could overcome his aimless, slapdash staging (Will Ferrell, no problem; Breckin Meyer, less so).

Continue reading: Starsky & Hutch Review

Wedding Crashers Review


OK
Good comedies get by on amusing concepts, while great comedies sustain the laughter long after they've delivered their one-line pitch. Wedding Crashers belongs in the former category. It rides its amusing premise like gangbusters for one solid act, but overextends itself the minute it leaves the comfy confines of its smart setup.

Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn, playing themselves, are John and Jeremy - lifelong friends who spend the wedding season crashing strangers' receptions for the free booze and vulnerable women. They have an angle for every party and work the room like politicians at a fund-raising breakfast. Watching them attack someone else's special day with reckless abandon provides the most fun I've ever had at a wedding, my own not included.

Continue reading: Wedding Crashers Review

The Minus Man Review


Bad
I'm still trying to figure out how to look at The Minus Man. Either it's supposed to be a dark, black comedy, or it's supposed to be a thoughtful, pensive drama/thriller a la Sling Blade.

Either way, it's a dismal failure.

Continue reading: The Minus Man Review

Anaconda Review


Bad
Really awful giant snake movie, notable for Jon Voight's worst role ever, where he uses the pet phrase "baby bird" repeatedly and is unforgettably swallowed whole by the creature, not to mention an early Jennifer Lopez appearance. Catch it on Cinemax or something if you feel you must, but we're hard-pressed to find anything worth recommending in this wannabe camp classic that turns out to be a wholly unbelievable camp disaster.

Behind Enemy Lines Review


Good
A film like Behind Enemy Lines reminds you of how the movies can so easily be used for government propaganda during times of crisis. During WWII, local cinemas were littered with the likes of John Wayne, Jimmy Stewart, and Gary Cooper fighting for freedom and the American Way against Nazi bastards and ruthless Japanese. Vietnam and the Cold War also had their propaganda films -- Rambo, anyone? In more recent times, the Gulf War and the Serbian conflict have also become the targets of eager filmmakers, but the public hasn't really accepted these films -- apparently the scale of the conflicts has not been enough to make much of an impact on an apathetic populace.

But that all changed on September 11, when American support for patriotism and military might -- no matter who the adversary -- hit a sudden, fever pitch. And so it was that the spring 2002 release (a dumping ground for films with very low expectations) of Behind Enemy Lines was pole-vaulted forward to the holiday heyday of November 30, 2001, buoyed by sky-high audience approval at test screenings. You want your ripped-from-today's-headlines movie? You got it.

Continue reading: Behind Enemy Lines Review

Shanghai Knights Review


Bad
I was in the minority of critics that actually gave Jackie Chan's last buddy picture The Tuxedo a passing grade. Sure, the plot is a throwaway and as Chan's super-spy partner, Jennifer Love Hewitt is a complete miscast. But thanks to Chan's great charisma, the movie transcends its doldrums. So with Shanghai Knights, the follow up to the entertaining Shanghai Noon, I feared this buddy story would suffer from similar inadequacies.

In Knights, Chan returns as Chon Wang, who along with sidekick Roy O'Bannon (Owen Wilson), take their latest adventure from the Wild Wild West to London, where Chon seeks to avenge the brutal slaying of his father and obtain the stolen Chinese Imperial Seal. While there, the pair teams up with Chon's much younger, hotter, and ass-kickinger sister, Lin (Fann Wong) to hunt down their father's killer, Rathbone (Aiden Gillen) and foil Rathbone's plot to assassinate the Royal family. The three certainly have their work cut out for them.

Continue reading: Shanghai Knights Review

I Spy Review


Terrible
I Spy is based on a popular 1960s television show by the same name where two mismatched spies, one white (Robert Culp) and one black (Bill Cosby), engage in wild antics to fight evil around the world. For a series during the middle of the civil rights era, it was considered groundbreaking. Unfortunately, the movie version completely disrespects this inventiveness of the original series. In fact, the movie is thoroughly insulting.

Owen Wilson is Alex Scott, a second-rate super-spy for the BNS (think CIA, I guess), who is always relegated to the department's least desirable assignments. Other BNS spies, like the suave Bond-like Carlos (Gary Cole), are equipped with the most sophisticated spy tools and receive the most attractive jobs. Scott's newest mission though, requires him to travel to Budapest, Hungary with beautiful fellow agent Rachel Wright (Famke Janssen) to prevent the sale of an invisible stealth spy plane. Some of the world's worst criminals have gathered in Budapest for a party sponsored by criminal mastermind Gundars (Malcolm McDowell). He plans to sell this plane during the celebration for an upcoming boxing match, which happens to involve the wildly flamboyant American featherweight boxing champion Kelly Robinson (Eddie Murphy). The BNS officials recruit Robinson to help Scott and Wright get into the party and accomplish their mission.

Continue reading: I Spy Review

The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou Review


Very Good
In The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, one sees other actors besides Bill Murray - quite a lot of them, actually - but there are really no other performances to speak of. This is his movie, and everyone else, no matter how large a role they have, is really just a walk-on. Now, to your average filmgoer, this sounds like a fine thing, after all, one doesn't often say, "I would have liked that movie more if there'd been less Bill Murray." (Except Garfield.) Oddly enough, this film-long tribute to Murray, with a script lovingly crafted for his deadpan delivery by Wes Anderson (The Royal Tenenbaums) and Noah Baumbach (filmcritic.com favorite Kicking And Screaming), is replete with stabs of comedic genius but never quite takes off.

Murray ambles through his performance as oceanographer Steve Zissou, whose longtime partner was just eaten by a rare species of shark ("which may or may not exist") and is determined to set off on an expedition to find the shark and kill it. When asked what scientific purpose this would satisfy, Zissou gives an almost imperceptible shrug and says, "revenge." Much in the same way that Luke Wilson's Richie in The Royal Tenenbaums had long outlived his brief fame as tennis pro by the time the film started, in Life Aquatic, Zissou's best days are already behind him, and the film is littered with the detritus of his past glory, many of them '70s-style nostalgia items like a special edition tennis shoe or a pinball machine featuring his bearded visage. The funding for Zissou's increasingly poorly-received films is drying up, it looks like his wife is about to leave him, and there's a reporter nosing around asking painful questions. So Zissou's expedition - a half-assed, barely-planned affair - is much less a research trip than a has-been's last hurrah, a perpetually stoned Ahab hunting his white whale (or jaguar shark, in this case).

Continue reading: The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou Review

Bottle Rocket Review


Excellent
The moment you know that Dignan's really lost it is during the trio's getaway from a not-so-daring bookstore robbery, when he excitedly states, "We're heading back to Bob's, we're gonna split up the loot, and go on the lam!"

In this hilarious first feature from writer/director Wes Anderson and screenwriter Owen Wilson, a trio of young men with questionable work ethics try in vain to become hardened criminals. Anthony (Owen's brother Luke Wilson) has just "escaped" from a voluntary mental hospital with the help of old pal Dignan (Owen), a neo-manic-depressive who's mapped out his life with felt-tip pen in a 75-year plan. Bob (Bob Musgrave) is the group's timid getaway driver whose main qualification is that he owns a car.

Continue reading: Bottle Rocket Review

Shanghai Noon Review


Excellent
The American movie studios are bastards when it comes to taking highly talented Asian directors and actors and pushing them into the American consciousness, invariably stereotyping and watering down the raw talent and energy of the individuals to increase their acceptance in American culture. Jet Li, Tsui Hark, Ringo Lam, Chow-Yun Fat, Michelle Yeong, and John Woo have all fallen victim to this epidemic, either starring in bad Joel Silver action movies, playing sinister villains in bad Joel Silver movies, seducing James Bond, or directing Jean Claude Van Damme in films stamped with one of his patented roundhouse kicks.

Jackie Chan represents the grand amalgamation of all of these actors combined. With the embarrassment of the re-release of a slew of his old Asian films, re-cut and dubbed in English, Jackie Chan was headed to the land of Jim Kelly (aka Black Belt Jones). But with the success of last year's Rush Hour, Chan was saved from the abyss of Don "The Dragon" Wilson by the mighty mouth of Chris Tucker and a $100 million dollar domestic gross. So, what's Chan's next move - let's take the same story as Rush Hour, make it a Western, throw in the well-established TV actress Lucy Liu, and added the wise-cracking Owen Wilson as his partner. And watch the money pour in.

Continue reading: Shanghai Noon Review

The Haunting (1999) Review


Bad
Some houses should never be visited. And some movies should never be remade. The Haunting represents both of those tenets.

A loose remake of the 1963 Haunting, this version gives us a creepy haunted house and four hapless people to populate it. Chief among them is Eleanor (Taylor), a real wacko who believes there are children's spirits in the house that speak to her. And she's right! Wow, original! And hey kids, the sexy Zeta-Jones plays a bisexual in the movie! Oooooh, scandalous! (Sarcasm, people.)

Continue reading: The Haunting (1999) Review

Meet The Parents Review


Extraordinary
Pity poor Greg Focker. Not only is the man employed as a male nurse with an unfortunate name, but he's about to meet his girlfriend's parents in order to ask dad for her hand in marriage. Only dad is about as humorless as, say, Robert De Niro. And poor Greg can't do anything right to save his skin.

It all reminds me, with flashback-like intensity, of meeting my own father-in-law-to-be, a guy so stern he makes De Niro look like Jim Carrey. Picture Ben Stiller as Focker (or me) and De Niro as himself, and, like magic, you've got yourself one hell of a comedy that will see few equals this year or any other. (Note to Dr. Carder: This is just a joke that I know you'll laugh about because we have such a great relationship! See you this Christmas!!!)

Continue reading: Meet The Parents Review

Rushmore Review


Extraordinary
When I asked Wes Anderson and Owen Wilson what would be next after 1996's Bottle Rocket, they told me they were working on a number of projects about "serious things." I expressed skepticism then, and it turns out it was justly founded. Rushmore is anything but serious, despite the Presidential-sounding name.

So, what is Rushmore? Rushmore is a prestigious private school in Nowhere, U.S.A. (actually Houston and Dallas, Texas), where its most vocal student, Max (Schwartzman), is also its worst academically. Rushmore the movie follows Max in his travails at school, where he falls hopelessly in love with teacher Miss Cross (Williams, straight from The Postman and a haircut). Unwilling to accept that the age differential is a concern, the 15-year old Max embarks on a grand scheme to build an enormous aquarium as a symbol of affection. That he builds it on the school's baseball diamond is what gets him thrown out of Rushmore.

Continue reading: Rushmore Review

I Spy Review


Unbearable

It's been 20 years since "48 Hrs." made Eddie Murphy a movie star and the man hasn't aged a day. But his showboating wise-cracker stock persona sure is getting old.

Unfurling that same mustachioed smirk he's worn in all his worst movies, Murphy strikes out again in "I-Spy," an ill-conceived, utterly vacuous, assembly-line, buddy action-comedy slapped together from paltry cloak-and-dagger scraps, off-the-shelf gimmicks and 30-year-old special effects.

Murphy plays a rich, egotistical professional boxer who is paired with a hapless secret agent (the winkingly ironic Owen Wilson, "Behind Enemy Lines") under the flimsiest of "wouldn't it be funny if" pretenses. The entire concept behind the film seems to consist of dropping these two into shopworn set pieces (a car chase, a shoot-out) and letting them ad-lib, ad nauseam.

Continue reading: I Spy Review

The Royal Tenenbaums Review


Very Good

Thick with director Wes Anderson's unique brand of laughing-on-the-inside irony, "The Royal Tenenbaums" is a bittersweet comedy of bourgeoisie dysfunction in a family of failed prodigies.

The Tenenbaum children each excelled so extraordinarily in their youth that life as adults might be disappointing even if being abandoned by their petulant, pejorative father (Gene Hackman at his grumpy greatest as Royal Tenenbaum) hadn't caused them all to crash and burn psychologically.

Pouty, introverted misery junkie Margot (Gwyneth Paltrow) was an acclaimed playwright in 9th grade. But now in her early 30s, she's moving back home because ennui has taken over her mirthless marriage.

Continue reading: The Royal Tenenbaums Review

The Minus Man Review


Good

Early on in "The Minus Man" you're not quite sure what you're seeing. There's a drifter named Vann (Owen Wilson) who lands in a small town. He's a polite, upright joe, but there's something not right about him that's hard to pin down.

He moves into with a tormented couple (Mercedes Ruehl and Brian Cox), who rent him the untouched room that once belonged to their missing (or is she dead?) daughter. He gets a job at the Post Office and is quickly promoted from sorter to carrier based on little more than his queer congeniality. He clumsily romances another postal employee (Janeane Garofalo in the cynicism-free role of an insecure romantic doormat), and just as the movie starts to look like a slice of life/ensemble of oddballs flick, townspeople start disappearing.

No one suspects Vann, of course. At first, not even the audience realizes they should. But Vann, you see, is a serial killer.

Continue reading: The Minus Man Review

Starsky & Hutch Review


Bad

Owen Wilson has a smarmy-cool, utterly natural screen persona of wicked, crooked smiles, cheeky ad-libs and ironically understated wisecracks. He never strays far from this trademarked character, but no matter who he's playing -- petty criminal ("The Big Bounce"), crooked cowboy ("Shanghai Noon"), severely dysfunctional pop novelist ("The Royal Tenenbaums") -- he seems like a guy it would be fun to hang out with.

Ben Stiller, on the other hand, has fallen into a terrible rut as an insufferable prat. Whether he's a caricature of a romantic failure ("Along Came Polly"), a caricature of a dim-bulb fashion model ("Zoolander") or a caricature of a nervous son-in-law ("Meet the Parents"), he never strays far from the same brand of off-putting, uptight dorkiness masked in mock-cool-guy pouts and tedious moments of deliberately cheesy slow-motion (say, while dancing like a dork, strutting like a dork or running like a dork). He seems like a guy you wouldn't want to spend two minutes with if you could at all help it.

Wilson has been a breath of scene-stealing fresh air in several Stiller vehicles (especially in "Zoolander" and "Meet the Parents"), but their yin-and-yang routine hits a wall in "Starsky and Hutch," a lifelessly stale parody-remake of the none-too-great-in-the-first-place 1970s cop show.

Continue reading: Starsky & Hutch Review

The Big Bounce Review


OK

Winningly wry and roguish Owen Wilson seems very much at home in the cheeky, tropical-noir world of Elmore Leonard in "The Big Bounce," a watered-down adaptation that has enjoyable vim and vigor, even if it isn't quite a faithful adaptation of Leonard's wily style.

Wilson has a gift for taking what other actors might see as rapid-fire dialogue and slowing it down to a hang-loose pace, making it seem more naturally smirky, and thereby making it his own. So as a lackadaisical surfer/vagabond/con man whose philosophy toward a career in crime is that he'll "take money if it's lying around," he's an ideal anti-hero to shrug his way through this fun but forgettable flick about an undercooked caper of mob money and double-crosses.

Fired from a construction job on the North Shore of Oahu and freshly sprung from the hoosegow after landing a baseball bat upside the foreman's noggin, Jack Ryan (Wilson) is offered a job by the blithely amused local judge who heard his case (Morgan Freeman, harmonizing perfectly with Wilson's laid-back style) -- and who likes to ruffle the feathers of Ray Ritchie (Gary Sinise), the crooked real estate developer who was pressing charges.

Continue reading: The Big Bounce Review

Meet The Fockers Review


Unbearable

If the thought of seeing Robert DeNiro strapping on a homemade rubber breast to feed a coddled baby sounds side-splittingly hilarious to you, then "Meet the Fockers" may be worth running out to see in theaters.

But if you're more pained by the idea of watching a formerly great actor embarrass himself in an infantile, desperately uncreative sequel that will do anything for a cheap laugh, just imagine 2000's "Meet the Parents" remade with the comedy sensibilities of a 12-year-old. That way you won't have to sit through Ben Stiller's sixth nearly identical performance this year.

Seemingly tired of his own worn-out schtick, Stiller half-heartedly mugs for the camera in anxious, eyebrow-stitching baby faces as he nervously introduces his retired-hippie parents, Bernie and Roz Focker (Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand), to DeNiro's Jack Byrnes, the intimidating ex-CIA spook who is soon to be his father-in-law. But other than making Stiller's folks embarrassing polar opposites of stiff, serious straight-man DeNiro (Hoffman is full of hugs, Streisand teaches tantric sex to septuagenarians), "Fockers" just recycles plot points from its predecessor (DeNiro interrogates and spies on Stiller throughout) and culls obvious jokes from the uncomfortable circumstances.

Continue reading: Meet The Fockers Review

Shanghai Noon Review


Good

"Shanghai Noon" is a Jackie Chan flick set in the Old West. If that inventive screwball setup isn't enough by itself to get you itching to see the movie, please feel free to read on.

The sanguine sovereign of the kung-fu caper comedy, Chan stars as a subservient Chinese imperial guard who is part of a rescue party dispatched to America in pursuit of a kidnapped princess (Lucy Liu from "Ally McBeal"), who is being ransomed by a traitorous expatriate and his cowboy cohorts in Carson City, circa 1881.

After he's separated from his high-born countrymen during a railroad robbery Chan resolves to rescue the princess himself and reluctantly buddies up with the ever-glib, handsomely broken-nosed Owen Wilson ("Bottle Rocket," "The Minus Man," "The Haunting"), one of the incompetent outlaws who stuck up the train.

Continue reading: Shanghai Noon Review

Zoolander Review


Good

"The fashion industry has been behind every major assassination in the last 200 years," says a bearded and scruffy, conspiracy-mad David Duchovny in Ben Stiller's ludicrously amusing "Zoolander" -- and only the world's most vapid male model can break his brainwashing and to put a stop to it all.

No, not Fabio. "Too smart," says the Karl Lagerfeld-like leader of a shadowy international syndicate of couture designers, while picking "a beautiful self-absorbed simpleton who can be molded like Jell-O" to kill the prime minister of Malaysia. I mean, the man plans to end slave wages for sweatshop garment workers in his country. He simply must be stopped!

Enter pouty, super-superficial mannequin man Derek Zoolander (Stiller). Desperate to rescue his career after losing the Male Model of the Year Award (insert oh-so-VH-1 ceremony here) to his up-and-coming rival, the dreaded, sexy surfer stud Hansel (Owen Wilson), Derek is ripe for reprogramming. Hired by the industry's designer de jour -- played by Will Ferrell in a poodle wig, charcoal eyeliner and a leather corset -- Derek is brainwashed to snap at a runway show for a new line of homeless bum-inspired ready-to-wear, called Derelicte (that's derelict with an "e" on the end). Ferrell has invited the Third World leader to sit in the front row.

Continue reading: Zoolander Review

The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou Review


Good

Steve Zissou is a washed-up Jacques Cousteau type suffering from an Ahab complex and middle-age ennui. His long-time first mate has just been eaten by the mysterious (and fictional) jaguar shark, and although his undersea documentaries haven't turned a profit in years, he's setting sail on one last low-budget oceanography adventure to make one last, rather out-of-character nature film -- about hunting down that shark if it's the last thing he does.

Another eccentric, buoyantly melancholy ensemble piece from wonderfully weird writer-director Wes Anderson ("Rushmore," "The Royal Tenenbaums"), "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou" is thick with the curious comedy of crew conflicts, researcher rivalries, laid-back shootouts with kidnapper pirates, and an outlandish underwater world teeming with colorfully imaginary stop-motion creatures created by Henry Selick ("The Nightmare Before Christmas").

But the movie's driving force is Anderson's signature sense of humor. The underlying (and unspoken) joke of this oddball farce is that it is transparently fake. Besides inventing an ocean full of fantastical life, the film is full of mischievous impossibilities, nonsense science, and cinematography designed to make it amusingly clear that the scenes onboard Zissou's run-down, retrofitted, World-War-II surplus sub-hunter ship are shot on a cut-away soundstage set.

Continue reading: The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou Review

The Haunting Review


Weak

Sooner or later, somebody had to make a super-spectacular CGI horror movie. I suppose it might as well be Jan DeBont, the guy who helped pioneer the F/X-over-substance, computer-generated blockbuster with his second movie, "Twister."

But lest he be mistaken for a director with any sense of moderation, DeBont lets his Intel-inside ghosts and goblins run rampant and unchecked in "The Haunting" -- a neo-classic horror remake with special effects so distractingly, excessively cool that you'll completely forget to be scared.

The plot of "The Haunting" -- that an unethical psychology prof (Liam Neeson) doing a study in fear bunks a trio of volunteer insomniacs at a haunted house under the guises of a sleep study -- is ridiculous and practically irrelevant against the backdrop of the manically over-decorated Xanadu in which hundreds of iron-cast, zombie-eyed cherubs, lions and deformed human sculptures morph to life and terrorize the cast.

Continue reading: The Haunting Review

Behind Enemy Lines Review


Weak

Bosnian Muslims are doe-eyed victims, Serbs are scowling, mangy movie heavies, and American soldiers are the most important people in the world in "Behind Enemy Lines," a self-aggrandizing action movie being released earlier than planned to cash in on the current atmosphere of flag-waving.

Vaguely inspired by the shoot-down and rescue of Air Force Capt. Scott O'Grady in 1995, the film stars ad-libbing wiseacre extraordinare Owen Wilson ("Shanghai Noon," "Zoolander") as a cocky F/A-18 navigator in a flashy "Top Gun" version of the U.S. Navy.

Downed over the former Yugoslavia while on a reconnaissance mission during a fragile cease-fire, Wilson is on the run from evil Serbs who know he photographed a mass grave of slaughtered Bosnian civilians. Meanwhile, onboard his home aircraft carrier, a barking-dog admiral played by Gene Hackman wants to mount a helicopter rescue, but his hands are tied by those nattering nabobs of the United Nations peacekeeping force, who have the audacity to think that not risking the cease-fire is more important than one American flyboy. How dare they!

Continue reading: Behind Enemy Lines Review

Meet The Parents Review


OK

Imagine asking Robert De Niro for his daughter's hand in marriage. (Shudder!) Now imagine he's an ex-CIA agent who keeps a lie detector in his basement. (Eek!) Now imagine you're Ben Stiller.

Now you see where "Meet the Parents" gets all its best laughs.

A middling comedy-of-the-uncomfortable escapade in which casting is the key, "Parents" stars Stiller as Greg Focker, a very nervous boyfriend spending a nightmare weekend at the childhood home of the girl he loves (Teri Polo).

Continue reading: Meet The Parents Review

Shanghai Knights Review


Very Good

Jackie Chan told me in an interview last year (which I failed to get written up -- sorry!) that the sequel to his kung-fu comedy-Western "Shanghai Noon" was "five times better than the first one." I didn't believe him. Jackie, I apologize.

Riding high on Chan's chemistry with Owen Wilson -- reigning king of the acerbic ad-lib -- "Shanghai Knights" is hilariously tongue-in-cheek and packed with comical homages to everything from the Keystone Kops and Harry Houdini to The Beatles and "Taxi Driver."

Although it might not quite measure up to Chan's claim of quintuple the quality, it is one of those rare multiplex delights: A sequel that bests its predecessor in nearly every way.

Continue reading: Shanghai Knights Review

Owen Wilson

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Owen Wilson

Date of birth

18th November, 1968

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.79


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Owen Wilson Movies

Wonder Movie Review

Wonder Movie Review

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Wonder Trailer

Wonder Trailer

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Cars 3 Movie Review

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Cars 3 Trailer

Former Piston Cup Champion Lightning McQueen was a hero in his day, but it seems...

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Cars 3 Trailer

Lightning McQueen may be a legendary name in the Piston Cup Championship history, but as...

Lost In London Live Trailer

Lost In London Live Trailer

In 2002, Woody Harrelson was arrested by police in London following a chase after an...

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Cars 3 - Teaser Trailer

Cars 3 - Teaser Trailer

Lightning McQueen is a legendary Piston Cup champion who might have shown humility and sportsmanship...

Who's Your Daddy Trailer

Who's Your Daddy Trailer

Peter and Kyle Reynolds have always been close brothers, not only are they twins but...

Zoolander 2 Movie Review

Zoolander 2 Movie Review

With virtually the same blend of wit and idiocy as the 2001 original, this fashion-scene...

Zoolander 2 - Relax Trailer

Zoolander 2 - Relax Trailer

Though Derek and Hansel have left the world of fashion modelling behind them, a part...

Zoolander 2 - Trailer Trailer

Zoolander 2 - Trailer Trailer

Derek, Hansel and some other familiar faces are back in Zoolander 2! After offering their...

No Escape Movie Review

No Escape Movie Review

One of the strongest action thrillers in recent years, this gripping movie cleverly casts actors...

Zoolander 2 - Teaser Trailer

Zoolander 2 - Teaser Trailer

After a disastrous return to the fashion industry following his retirement, which almost ended in...

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