Otis Redding

Otis Redding

Otis Redding Quick Links

News Video Film Press Quotes RSS

Otis Redding - Mojo Working - The Making of Modern Music


'The Making Of Modern Music' looks at the seminal soul artist that was Georgia born singer Otis Redding, whose powerful vocal talent left a legacy of later singles long after his untimely death in the 60s.

Otis Redding - In Concert (Live)


Prior to his tragic death in a plane crash on 10th December 1967, Otis Redding gave a live performance in Norway, along with various other performers. It was released on DVD in 2007 as 'Stax/Volt Revue Live In Norway 1967'.

Modern Bluesman Bobby Blue Bland Dies in Memphis Aged 83


Van Morrison Otis Redding Grateful Dead The Band

Bobby (Blue) Bland, the balladeer whose sophisticated style modernized the blues, has died at his home in Germantown, near Memphis, aged 83. Bobby's death was confirmed his son Rodd, who played drums in his band. Despite possessing all the natural attributes of, say, Ray Charles and B.B King, Bland never reached the same lofty heights as some of his more popular contemporaries though remained a mainstay on the rhythm-and-blues circuit for decades.

His vocals, punctuated by the occasional James Brown esque shout, took on an air of emotional pleading and he influenced everyone from Otis Redding to Wilson Pickett. Younger music fans may recognise Mr Bland's 1974 single 'Ain't No Love In The Heart of the City' on his 2001 album The Blueprint.

Mr Bland matched his sharp vocals with elegant stage wear and became a hugely recognisable performer on the circuit. He formed a close working bond with trumpet player and arranger Joe Scott, the men accounting for more than 30 Top 20 rhythm-and-blues singles for Duke Records in Houston. Many contemporary rock bands covered songs from these years, including The Grateful Dead (Love Light), The Band (Share Your Love With Me), and Van Morrison (Ain't Nothing You Can Do). 

Continue reading: Modern Bluesman Bobby Blue Bland Dies in Memphis Aged 83

The Power Of Song: Songs From Some Of The Biggest British Christmas Adverts In 2012


Gabrielle Aplin Elton John T-Rex Otis Redding

Macy's Santa

TV commercials have always been a time for fresh, new and unheard song covers to emerge as well as the old classics especially during the holiday season, just to make the product invoke that little bit of nostalgia to fuel the Christmas shopping fever. 

This year is no different as we have, of course, rising star Gabrielle Aplin with her stunning rendition of Frankie Goes To Hollywood's 1984 hit 'Power of Love' recorded for John Lewis' new seasonal advert. It has already reached number one in the UK and is set to also feature on her upcoming debut album 'English Rain'. In fact, people have loved it so much that Twinings tea have also snapped up the tune for their advert which will no doubt help Aplin's career skyrocket over the coming months. 

Continue reading: The Power Of Song: Songs From Some Of The Biggest British Christmas Adverts In 2012

Monterey Pop Review


Excellent
For those of us who weren't yet born when the 1960's rock 'n' rolled around, Monterey Pop affords an affectionate glimpse of the music that influenced our parents to be hippies. From Otis Redding to Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin to the Mamas and the Papas, and Jefferson Airplane to The Who, this documentary is jam-packed with contagious energy. But I give fair warning that I will reveal the ending, which does not do the rest of the film the justice it deserves.

Shot in 1969 at an outdoor concert that precluded Woodstock, the film defies the stereotype of the general population at the time. Sure, some have painted their faces and smoke joints, but D.A. Pennebaker (The War Room, Moon Over Broadway) surprisingly chooses to show a broad spectrum of the audience. No matter who is watching, it all comes back to the talented musicians that stir your soul.

Continue reading: Monterey Pop Review

Monterey Pop Review


Excellent
For those of us who weren't yet born when the 1960's rock 'n' rolled around, Monterey Pop affords an affectionate glimpse of the music that influenced our parents to be hippies. From Otis Redding to Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin to the Mamas and the Papas, and Jefferson Airplane to The Who, this documentary is jam-packed with contagious energy. But I give fair warning that I will reveal the ending, which does not do the rest of the film the justice it deserves.

Shot in 1969 at an outdoor concert that precluded Woodstock, the film defies the stereotype of the general population at the time. Sure, some have painted their faces and smoke joints, but D.A. Pennebaker (The War Room, Moon Over Broadway) surprisingly chooses to show a broad spectrum of the audience. No matter who is watching, it all comes back to the talented musicians that stir your soul.

Continue reading: Monterey Pop Review

Otis Redding

Otis Redding Quick Links

News Video Film Press Quotes RSS