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Olivia Williams - Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) - 'Maps To The Stars' - Premiere - Toronto, Canada - Wednesday 10th September 2014

Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams

Manhattan Cast, Ashley Zukerman, Daniel Stern, Olivia Williams, John Benjamin Hickey, Rachel Brosnahan, Thomas Schlamme and Sam Shaw - WGN's 'Manhattan' - Photocall - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 9th July 2014

Manhattan Cast, Ashley Zukerman, Daniel Stern, Olivia Williams, John Benjamin Hickey, Rachel Brosnahan, Thomas Schlamme and Sam Shaw
Daniel Stern
Daniel Stern
Manhattan Cast, Ashley Zukerman, Daniel Stern, Olivia Williams, John Benjamin Hickey, Rachel Brosnahan, Thomas Schlamme and Sam Shaw
Daniel Stern

John Benjamin Hickey, Olivia Williams, Rachel Brosnahan, Ashley Zuckerman, Thomas Schlamme, Sam Shaw, Bill Richardson and Daniel Stern - The Paley Center For Media Presents An Evening With WGN America's Manhattan - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 9th July 2014

John Benjamin Hickey, Olivia Williams, Rachel Brosnahan, Ashley Zuckerman, Thomas Schlamme, Sam Shaw, Bill Richardson and Daniel Stern
John Benjamin Hickey
John Benjamin Hickey
John Benjamin Hickey

Olivia Williams and Rhashan Stone - London Evening Standard Theatre Awards held at the Savoy - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 17th November 2013

Olivia Williams and Rhashan Stone
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams and Rhashan Stone
Olivia Williams

Olivia Williams - Celebrities attend the 'Justin and the Knights of Valour' Screening at the Mayfair Hotel - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th September 2013

Olivia Williams - The UK Premiere of 'Justin and the Knights of Valour' held at the May Fair Hotel - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th September 2013

Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams

Video - Olivia Williams Talks About Her New Sci-Fi Flick 'Last Days On Mars' In Cannes Interview


'Anna Karenina' actress Olivia Williams is interviewed at a press junket in Cannes for her new movie 'Last Days On Mars' and talks about what attracted her to the script, who she modelled her character on and her favourite memory from shooting.

Continue: Video - Olivia Williams Talks About Her New Sci-Fi Flick 'Last Days On Mars' In Cannes Interview

Olivia Williams - First Light Awards held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 19th March 2013

Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams

Hyde Park On Hudson Review


Good

The breezy, entertaining tone of this historical comedy-drama kind of undermines the fact that it centres on one of the most pivotal moments in US-British history. Director Michell (Notting Hill) knows how to keep an audience engaged, and yet he indulges in both tawdry innuendo and silly cliches, never giving the real-life events a proper sense of perspective. Even so, some terrific performances make it enjoyable.

The events in question take place in 1939, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt (Murray) invites Britain's King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (West and Colman) to visit Hyde Park, the upstate New York residence he shares with his mother (Wilson), while his wife Eleanor (Williams) lives down the road with her "she-male" friends. Roosevelt knows that George is here to ask for help against the growing threat of Hitler's Germany, and as a result of their talks a "special relationship" develops between America and Britain. Meanwhile, the womanising Roosevelt is not-so-quietly having an affair with his distant cousin and confidant Daisy (Linney).

Essentially there are two films here fighting for our attention. Much of the story is seen through Daisy's eyes, complete with an annoyingly mousy voiceover that never tells us anything we can't see on screen. Linney underplays the character to the point where we barely notice that she's in the room, and the depiction of Daisy's romance with FDR is often squirm-inducing. By contrast, the other aspect of the plot is fascinating, with West and especially Colman shining in their roles as witty, nervous Brits trying to make the most of the first ever visit of a British monarch to America. Their steely resolve is brilliantly undermined by their brittle nerves and endless curiosity. 

Continue reading: Hyde Park On Hudson Review

Olivia Williams - Celebrities outside the ITV Studios London United Kingdom Friday 25th January 2013

Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams

Olivia Williams and Royal Albert Hall London, United Kingdom Kooza Cirque Du Soleil opening night at the Royal Albert Hall - Arrivals Tuesday 8th January 2013

Olivia Williams and Royal Albert Hall
Olivia Williams, Cirque Du Soleil and Royal Albert Hall
Olivia Williams, Cirque Du Soleil and Royal Albert Hall
Olivia Williams and Royal Albert Hall
Olivia Williams and Royal Albert Hall
Olivia Williams and Royal Albert Hall

Hot Tickets! This Weekend’s US Movie Releases: Hyde Park On Hudson, Playing For Keeps, Lay The Favorite, Bad Kids Go To Hell


Bill Murray Roger Michell Laura Linney Olivia Williams Gerard Butler Jessica Biel Rebecca Hall Bruce Willis Stephen Frears Judd Nelson

Kind of a disappointing showing this week folks, best hold on for those Christmas heartwarmers, or, if you’re one of the 56 people left on the globe that haven’t seen Skyfall, that’s probably still showing…

Hyde Park On Hudson has been touted by many as Bill Murray’s next stab at Oscar success. However, the movie itself has hardly received glowing reviews. Directed by Roger Michell (Notting Hill) and also starring Laura Linney and Olivia Williams, Hyde Park on Hudson tells the story of Franklin D Roosevelt and his love affair with his distant cousin, Margaret Stuckley. The ‘action’ takes place over a weekend in 1939, when the King & Queen of England visited upstate New York.

Murray’s performance has been hailed as a masterpiece and there have been mutterings of Oscar contention, but it seems that Murray is a jewel in a pretty shabby crown, here. He may carry the film, but it’s clear that it’s a deadweight. Bill will have to keep his fingers crossed that the Academy award voters can stay awake through the historical drama long enough to appreciate his performance.

Continue reading: Hot Tickets! This Weekend’s US Movie Releases: Hyde Park On Hudson, Playing For Keeps, Lay The Favorite, Bad Kids Go To Hell

Olivia Williams and Rhashan Stone - Olivia Williams and Rhashan Stone Sunday 25th November 2012 London Evening Standard Theatre Awards held at The Savoy

Olivia Williams and Rhashan Stone
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams

Olivia Williams Saturday 13th October 2012 50th Annual New York Film Festival - 'Hyde Park On Hudson' Screening - Arrivals

Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Bill Murray, Roger Michell, Olivia Williams, Laura Linney and Richard Nelson
Olivia Williams

Olivia Williams Thursday 13th September 2012 'Now Is Good' European film premiere held at the Curzon Mayfair - Arrivals.

Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams

Olivia Williams Tuesday 4th September 2012 The World Premiere of Anna Karenina held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals.

Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams

Olivia Williams Thursday 12th July 2012 at the ITV studios

Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams

Now Is Good Trailer


Tessa is like every other sixteen year old; she'd love a boyfriend and she'd like to lose her virginity as soon as possible. Her best friend Tessa encourages her wishes. There is a difference, however: Tessa has leukaemia. She was diagnosed with it four years ago but has recently learned that it is terminal.

Continue: Now Is Good Trailer

Olivia Williams and BAFTA Sunday 12th February 2012 Orange British Academy Film Awards (BAFTAs) held at the Royal Opera House - Arrivals

Olivia Williams and Bafta
Olivia Williams and Bafta
Olivia Williams and Bafta

Hanna Review


Very Good
Pacey and offbeat, this cat-and-mouse film keeps us on our toes by layering the action thriller with fairy tale parallels. And the cast is strong enough to keep us engaged even when the plot skips over some glaring implausibilities.

Hanna (Ronan) has spent her entire life deep in the snowy woods, where her ex-spy dad (Bana) has raised her to be the ultimate super-agent. Now 16, she's ready to face up to her wicked nemesis Marissa (Blanchett), the agent who killed her mother. But Marissa has caught her trail, and as they chase each other Marissa calls in a ruthless German henchman (Hollander) for help.

Meanwhile, Hanna hides out with a sparky British teen (Barden) whose hippie parents (Williams and Flemyng) have no idea what's going on.

Continue reading: Hanna Review

The Ghost [aka The Ghost Writer] Review


Excellent
Tightly wound and told without much fuss, this political thriller is captivating and often quite tense even though it doesn't seem to have much visual panache. But Polanski's fiendishly clever and extremely subtle touch is in every frame.

When a successful British ghost-writer (McGregor) is hired to clean up the memoirs of former Prime Minister Adam Lang (Brosnan), he can't quite believe the large paycheque heading his way. He soon relocates to an isolated island home in America to work with Lang, his wife (Williams) and assistant (Cattrall), but it quickly becomes clear that something fishy's going on here.

And maybe the scandalous news reports, about Lang's approval of torture in the War on Terror, are missing the real story.

Continue reading: The Ghost [aka The Ghost Writer] Review

The Ghost Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Ghost

Continue: The Ghost Trailer

Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll Review


Good
Anchored by a ripping central performance from Serkis, this biopic about notorious musician Ian Dury is too stylish for its own good. Director Whitecross shows ambition and audacity, but his riotous visual style is distracting.

Disabled by polio at age 10, Ian Dury (Serkis) grew up with a fierce determination to be himself, and against the odds became an iconic leader of Britain's punk scene in the 1970s. But his unruly lifestyle takes a toll on his personal relationships, and he barely knows his son Baxter (Milner) from his first wife Betty (Williams). So Baxter comes to stay with him and his current girlfriend Denise (Harris), and both father and son need to figure out how to relate to each other. And to realise how much they need each other.

Continue reading: Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll Review

An Education Review


Very Good
A lively tone and very funny dialog kind of throw us off the scent of this film's starkly serious themes. Beneath the charm and humour is an intriguing story about a time when being a strong-willed young woman just wasn't allowed.

In 1961 London, Jenny (Mulligan) is a gifted 16-year-old on track for a place at Oxford University, much to the joy of her parents (Molina and Seymour), literature teacher (Williams) and headmistress (Thompson). Then she meets the charismatic David (Sarsgaard), an older man who sweeps her off her feet with a love of the arts, his glamorous life and intelligent friends (Cooper and Pike) who offer more engagement than Jenny finds with those her age. Jenny loves being all grown up around them. Who needs Oxford?

Continue reading: An Education Review

An Education Trailer


 

Watch the trailer for An Education

Jenny (Carey Mulligan - Public Enemies) is a schoolgirl with very high hopes in a considerably bleak post war Britain. Her thoughts of a place at Oxford University are fuel to her 'study-intensive' life as she forever tries to excel. Until just a short time before her 17th birthday she meets David (Peter Sarsgaard- Jarhead) who is considerably older than her, and she soon finds herself in the middle of a whirlwind romance.

Enticed by the lifestyle that it seems David can offer her, her dreams of Oxford start to slowly dissipate as the idea of an easy life becomes her new fascination. But as she makes the transition from enthusiastic schoolgirl to a lady of sophistication, she starts to question David, herself and the path in life she has chosen to take.

Directed by Lone Sherfig (Hjemve) and with a screenplay from Nick Hornby (Fever Pitch, About A Boy), and featuring a performance from Academy award winner Emma Thompson, the film received great critical acclaim when it premiered at this year's Sundance Film Festival.

Cast: Peter Sarsgaard, Carey Mulligan, Alfred Molina, Dominic Cooper, Rosamund Pike, Olivia Williams and Emma Thompson.

Screenplay: Nick Hornby.

Director: Lone Sherfig.

The Man From Elysian Fields Review


OK
James Coburn is just great in The Man from Elysian Fields, one of his final performances before recently succumbing to a heart attack. As a dying, once-great novelist, the veteran actor displays a combination of fire and vulnerability that makes him a riveting presence.

Unfortunately, such generous adjectives can't be used for Elysian, which has a promising premise but does little of interest with it. Andy Garcia plays Byron Triller, a struggling novelist who has mounds of trouble supporting his young family. Out of luck and out of nowhere, Byron meets a mysterious, upscale pimp, Luther (Mick Jagger), who thinks Byron would be an ideal addition to his escort service.

Continue reading: The Man From Elysian Fields Review

The Sixth Sense Review


Excellent
Another week in '99, another horror film. But will The Sixth Sense really scare you? Despite the title that is more reminiscent of Leprechaun than The Exorcist, this is a genuinely creepy film with a solid story, great acting, and a surprise ending that not even a jaded critic like me saw coming.

The concept is that young Cole Sear (Haley Joel Osment) sees ghosts, and they torment him night and day, to the point of physical abuse. Desperate for help, he eventually hooks up with brilliant child psychologist Malcolm Crowe (Bruce Willis), who tries to help him out.

Continue reading: The Sixth Sense Review

Born Romantic Review


Good
Kooky, nutty, cheesy... David Kane's Born Romantic is all over the romantic map as it tries to weave together three, four, or more Brit-love stories. Some are hit and miss, and the women in the movie (Jane Horrocks, Catherine McCormack, Olivia Williams) generally run rings around the blokes (in terms of acting ability, anyway). Altogether the movie never really gels, coming together like a cross between episodes of Coupling and Benny Hill.

4 Dogs Playing Poker Review


Good
Take a cast, temptingly mixed with up-and-comers, never-will-be's, and crazy non-sequiturs like Tim Curry, and toss them into a highly unlikely caper/noir and what do you get? Well, a predictably messy, yet surprisingly fun, bit of cinema.

Sure 'nuff, I never could have expected the day when Olivia Williams (Rushmore) and Balthazar Getty (Shadow Hours) would appear in the same film -- much less play lovers. And in fact, the rest of 4 Dogs Playing Poker is just as improbable, with Tim Curry(!) leading four young and aspiring art thieves on a caper in Argentina, only to blow it by failing to ensure the loot is shipped to the man (Forest Whitaker) who comissioned the gig. Our young heroes find themselves in a bind, as Curry gets snuffed and they are asked to pay up $1 million for the objet d'art gone missing. Their plan: insure each of their lives for a mil, then secretly and randomly assign one of the four to kill another, thus collecting the payoff fee.

Continue reading: 4 Dogs Playing Poker Review

The Postman (1997) Review


Bad
When picking a protagonist for a movie as massively pulp as this filmwas, a good idea is to make a character that the audience can have some connection with. In order to do this, it might be a good idea to not associate said character with anything that alienates the character. In other words: if you want to choose your basic pulp protagonist, please do not choose their occupation as something that has become synonymous with psychopath.

Yes, I'm talking about The Postman. Post-millennial, post-apocalyptic, and post-intelligence, The Postman is the story of patriotism being reborn (ironically, the patriotism is in opposition to nationalism, which is the flip side of the patriotic coin) in the form of Postal Carriers. OK. It's dumb. The United States has become defunct, a racist psychopath holds all of the power, and the first thing that the new US Government is trying to get working is the mail.

Continue reading: The Postman (1997) Review

The Heart Of Me Review


Weak
The British love their melodramas. The makers of this one seem to have lost sight of when having too much of it becomes boring and burdensome. Based on a 1953 novel called The Echoing Grove by Rosamond Lehmann, the style of sentimentality brought to intense levels of angst amid constricting mores seems aimed at audiences of that era. As a new release, Lucinda Coxon's screenplay is likely to foster ennui well before it reaches its climax (no pun intended).

The plot is thin, if not threadbare, presenting the too-oft-seen love triangle. Perhaps the notion of a pair of sisters in love (in their particular ways) with one's husband seemed like an original idea, but it comes off as derivative and tedious. Paul Bettany, who played Chaucer in A Knight's Tale and John Nash's imaginary roommate in A Beautiful Mind, takes on the colorless banker-husband-lover Rickie, the object of the sisters' desires. Stuffy though he may be, we understand why he's prone to stray from his wife, Madeleine (Olivia Williams), a caustic and chilly socialite who criticizes her younger sister with haughty superiority. She seems to think that there's something wrong with Dinah (Helena Bonham Carter) for remaining unmarried and free-spirited when, as we see it, Dinah is the more attractive and sensual of the two.

Continue reading: The Heart Of Me Review

Valiant Review


Weak
A lithe Canadian beauty beat the tar out of a Disney animated feature this weekend. People opted to see Steve Carell get his chest waxed. Penguins, not the singing and dancing ones, but ordinary penguins, were a more appealing option than Valiant.

It's easy to see why the money is going elsewhere. Valiant clocks in at just below 80 minutes, and it feels padded. The typical Disney trademarks of untested heroes, sarcastic sidekicks, and puppy love are offered, but they feel like hand-me-downs, worn ragged by Aladdin, Timon, and the rest. Nothing in Valiant is larger than life, including the villains, always a staple. Tim Curry voices an evil falcon, and his work won't make anyone forget Jeremy Irons' Scar anytime soon.

Continue reading: Valiant Review

Lucky Break Review


Good
Prison flick meets musical comedy in this oddball conflagration of genres, a British feel-good flick that just so happens to be the follow-up film director Peter Cattaneo made after The Full Monty. Four years went by, Cattaneo's name became all but forgotten, and films like this became Cattaneo's legacy. (Four years after Lucky Break, Cattaneo is finally shooting his next film.) The lovely Olivia Williams shoulders a lot of love here as the object of one prisoner's sights -- at least when he isn't doing double duty as a showman in the warden's play and planning his big escape. Lively enough to keep you paying attention through to the end, even if the whole affair is a bit absurdly silly.

Rushmore Review


Extraordinary
When I asked Wes Anderson and Owen Wilson what would be next after 1996's Bottle Rocket, they told me they were working on a number of projects about "serious things." I expressed skepticism then, and it turns out it was justly founded. Rushmore is anything but serious, despite the Presidential-sounding name.

So, what is Rushmore? Rushmore is a prestigious private school in Nowhere, U.S.A. (actually Houston and Dallas, Texas), where its most vocal student, Max (Schwartzman), is also its worst academically. Rushmore the movie follows Max in his travails at school, where he falls hopelessly in love with teacher Miss Cross (Williams, straight from The Postman and a haircut). Unwilling to accept that the age differential is a concern, the 15-year old Max embarks on a grand scheme to build an enormous aquarium as a symbol of affection. That he builds it on the school's baseball diamond is what gets him thrown out of Rushmore.

Continue reading: Rushmore Review

Below Review


Weak
When is somebody going to scare the shit out of us again?

Will the day arrive when I can watch a movie with the same frightened, uneasy feeling I get when I walk through my darkened hallway at midnight?

Continue reading: Below Review

Peter Pan (2003) Review


Essential
The time is right to rekindle our relationship with J.M. Barrie's perpetually adolescent adventurer, Peter Pan. By now, you've probably forgotten Disney's 50-year-old animated adaptation of Barrie's work, and many of us are still trying to purge Steven Spielberg's hollow update Hook from our minds. We adults need a refresher course, and a new generation of whimsy-challenged kids needs a proper introduction to the happy-go-lucky joys of Pan.

Though it goes against everything he stands for, this rejuvenated Pan actually shows signs of growth and maturity. Special effects advancements help Peter and his cohorts pop off the screen. Cinematographer Donald McAlpine expands the rich color palette he utilized in such vivid films as Moulin Rogue and Romeo + Juliet. And director P.J. Hogan slips in subplots of unrequited love, develops pangs of loneliness, and mixes fleeting flights of happiness with his heroism.

Continue reading: Peter Pan (2003) Review

Peter Pan Review


Good

In an era of severely dumbed-down children's movies, the first live-action "Peter Pan" picture since the silent era does something extraordinary -- it un-Disneyfies the story, revives the deeper themes of J.M. Barrie's original book and play, and emerges as an appropriately wily family-fare delight.

From its exquisite, Maxfield-Parish-inspired Neverland of golden sunlight, lush green forests and cotton-candy clouds to the quintessently pubescent and enigmatically tingly chemistry between Peter (the strangely pretty 14-year-old Jeremy Sumpter) and Wendy (the even prettier 13-year-old Rachel Hurd-Wood), the film is a vivid and surprisingly visceral experience.

Director P.J. Hogan ("My Best Friend's Wedding") evokes the true wonder of childhood in the eyes of his young stars as Peter Pan, the mythical leafy-clad boy who refused to grow up, hovers with the power of happy thoughts and fairy dust outside the third-story window of Wendy Darling on a snowy night in 1900s London, engrossed in the stories of adventure that the girl spins with wide-eyed zeal for her little bothers John and Michael.

Continue reading: Peter Pan Review

Lucky Break Review


OK

Do you remember that scene at the end of "The Sound of Music" in which the family Von Trapp sneaks out of Austria one at a time during a singing performance? So do screenwriter Ronan Bennett and director Peter Cattaneo ("The Full Monty"), who borrowed the idea for their far-fetched but passably entertaining British prison escape comedy "Lucky Break."

As a matter of fact, in a stroke of intentional irony Cattaneo cast Christopher Plummer -- Capt. Von Trapp himself -- as the prison's warden, whose dream of producing his own musical becomes the catalyst for a group of ambitious jailbirds to make getaway plans.

Lead by charmingly surly, hound dog-featured James Nesbit ("Waking Ned Devine"), the convicts (including comical English actors Timothy Spall, Bill Nighy and Lennie James) rehearse the warden's Gilbert and Sullivan-styled operetta about Admiral Horatio Nelson in the prison's disused old chapel while working out a way to employ stage props to go "over the wall."

Continue reading: Lucky Break Review

Below Review


Good

Already packed solid with all the claustrophobic wartime tension a good submarine thriller needs, "Below" squeezes in something more -- a startling, bone-chilling element of the supernatural.

Set onboard an American sub called the USS Tiger Shark, cruising the Atlantic during World War II, the tightly drawn story begins with the boat doubling back on its planned course under orders to rescue the only three survivors of a torpedoed British hospital ship -- a crewman, a badly burned patient and a nurse (Olivia Williams), who causes consternation among the crew. She's pretty, sure. But more importantly, maritime superstition holds that women are bad luck on a submarine.

Director David Twohy ("Pitch Black") wastes no time in building seat-gripping suspense. The Tiger Shark's sonar officer picks up an unknown contact just as the sub is surfacing amongst the sunken steamer's debris, so the rescue becomes a palpably perilous race against time. The scene is nerve-wracking, thanks in no small part to Twohy's touches of tense creativity (all the dread he needs is found in a single shot looking back at the captain's eye from inside the periscope) and a potently unsettling, untraditionally military score by Graeme Revell ("Pitch Black," "Blow," "Tomb Raider").

Continue reading: Below Review

The Sixth Sense Review


Good

If the line is still too long for "The Blair Witch Project" this weekend, buy a ticket to "The Sixth Sense," the first truly scary studio picture in longer than I can remember and a serious contender against "Blair" for most creepiest movie of the year.

Yes, I know it's a Bruce Willis flick, and yes, I know the plot -- about a very disturbed little boy who talks to ghosts -- sounds inane.

But this movie stunned me. The hair on the back of my neck stood up five or six times in this picture. The traumatized performance by Haley Joel Osment as the haunted child is the most skilled and chilling turn by a pre-pubescent actor since Kirsten Dunst in "Interview with the Vampire." And Willis, as an emotionally wrecked kiddie shrink, garners more empathy than a truck full of other ex-action heroes could.

Continue reading: The Sixth Sense Review

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Olivia Williams Movies

Victoria & Abdul Movie Review

Victoria & Abdul Movie Review

Essentially a sequel to the 1997 hit Mrs Brown, this film returns Judi Dench to...

Victoria And Abdul Trailer

Victoria And Abdul Trailer

Queen Victoria was one of the United Kingdom's most loved monarchs. She ruled over her...

Man Up Movie Review

Man Up Movie Review

Truly enjoyable British romantic-comedies come along so rarely (Four Weddings and a Funeral was more...

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A simple train journey can have incredibly far-reaching consequences. When Nancy (Lake Bell) meets Jessica...

Maps to the Stars Movie Review

Maps to the Stars Movie Review

As it explores Hollywood's inbred underbelly, this film becomes increasingly deranged and also rather dark...

Maps To The Stars Trailer

Maps To The Stars Trailer

Havana Segrand (Julianne Moore) is an actress struggling with her insecurities and desperate to reprise...

Sabotage Movie Review

Sabotage Movie Review

Arnold Schwarzenegger gets one of his most complex roles yet in this messy, violent thriller,...

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Sabotage Trailer

Sabotage Trailer

John 'Breacher' Wharton is the head of a DEA Special Operations Team, well-known by authorities...

Sabotage Trailer

Sabotage Trailer

John 'Breacher' Wharton is the leader of a DEA Special Operations Team who, although happen...

Justin and the Knights of Valour Trailer

Justin and the Knights of Valour Trailer

Justin is an average boy with big dreams living in a Kingdom where the Queen...

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