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'Furious 7' Gives Paul Walker A Proper Send-Off

Paul Walker Oliver Reed Armie Hammer

When actor Paul Walker was killed in a car accident halfway through shooting the seventh 'Fast & Furious' movie, director James Wan made the difficult decision to finish the film, completing Walker's performance using both stand-ins and digital effects created from existing footage.

Paul Walker and the team of 'Furious 7'
Paul Walker and the team of 'Furious 7'

To make the scenes look seamless, Wan hired Peter Jackson's Weta Digital to use blend the various elements into the completed film. And in a nice touch, he got Paul's brothers Cody and Caleb to perform as body doubles in the remaining sequences.

Continue reading: 'Furious 7' Gives Paul Walker A Proper Send-Off

CGI, Body Doubles & Voice Overs To Complete Paul Walker's Fast & Furious 7 Scenes?

Paul Walker Philip Seymour Hoffman Oliver Reed Heath Ledger

Paul Walker may still be able to complete Fast & Furious 7 with the use of body doubles, CGI and voice overs reports suggest. Walker died in a car accident in November of last year when filming for the seventh film had yet to be completed. 

Paul Walker
Paul Walker's scenes in Fast & Furious 7 will be completed using special effects.

Read more Paul Walker news on Contactmusic.

Continue reading: CGI, Body Doubles & Voice Overs To Complete Paul Walker's Fast & Furious 7 Scenes?

Brittany Murphy's 'Something Wicked' To Be Released, Other Posthumous Movie Releases

Brittany Murphy Philip Seymour Hoffman Paul Walker Heath Ledger Richard Harris Oliver Reed

Brittany Murphy’s final movie ‘Something Wicked’ is due to be released over four years since her tragic and ambiguous death. The plot focuses on a young couple who find themselves faced with a past that they had hoped would remain buried. Murphy died in 2009, after allegedly being stricken with acute pneumonia and severe anemia. The same results were found on her husband, Simon Monjack’s post mortum, when he died just five months after her.

brittany murphy something wicked Brittany Murphy looked extraordinarily thin in the months before her death

Over the past 15 years Brittany Murphy is not the only star to die before their latest project is released. Oliver Reed suffered a heart attack whilst filming Ridley Scott’s Gladiator, which came out in 2000. The movie was completed using CGI and a stunt double to finish his scenes.  Those of you who have seen the movie can appreciate quite how flawlessly this was done, it's virtually impossible to tell that Reed isn't in certain scenes.

Continue reading: Brittany Murphy's 'Something Wicked' To Be Released, Other Posthumous Movie Releases

Michael Parkinson's Doctor: "I Assure You, You Will Not Die Of This"

Michael Parkinson Oliver Reed Muhammad Ali Meg Ryan

Michael Parkinson's cancer specialist has assured him he will not die of the prostate cancer he was diagnosed with in May. The legendary chat show host, 78, is expected to be given the all-clear within weeks after spotting the cancer early. "I had to start calling a few of my social engagements to tell them I couldn't do it - what do you say to them?" he said, "When you are told you have something like cancer, it is a shock."

Nevertheless, Parkinson is remaining optimistic and says his specialist assures him the cancer is confined to his prostate, "The cancer specialist said: 'I will assure you, you will not die of this.' I am concerned about it, of course, but I am not frightened of it" adding, "I shall be around for a while yet, to the delight of my friends and the dismay of my enemies."

More than 40,000 men in the UK are diagnosed with prostate cancer and around 250,000 are currently living with the disease. Common symptoms include frequent trips to the toilet though reduce flow of urine. Sir Michael has been outspoken on the need for men to pay attention to their health in a bid to catch diseases early. He said: "The test is if you can pee against a wall from 2ft, you haven't got it..I don't want to trivialise it, but men know when there's a problem. I have been lucky, but men are silly about their health.Get it checked out - it might be something else."

Continue reading: Michael Parkinson's Doctor: "I Assure You, You Will Not Die Of This"

Women In Love Review

Ken Russell's Women in Love is alternately heralded and dismissed by viewers. I stand somewhere in the middle: It's a definite mess, though the titular women out-act the men they're ostensibly in love with. Russell's at his pervy best here (and Glenda Jackson was the first actress to win an Oscar in a movie featuring a nude scene; in this case her own plus a notorious all-male, all-nude, fireside wrestling sequence), and his interpretation of D.H. Lawrence's book is on the liberal side. But ultimately the film is so confusing and meandering that its perversity is shuffled under the rug of its own pretensions. Still, it's memorable for both its era-specific shock value and for Jackson's alternately sweet and vicious performance.

The Adventures Of Baron Munchausen Review

Before he made The Brothers Grimm, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen was arguably Terry Gilliam's least popular film. The story is slow to start, takes too long to finish, and meanders almost irredeemably until finally paying off in the end. The story is adapted from the "tall tale" book of the same name, which gives us a self-proclaimed baron (John Neville in a career-defining role) who regales anyone who'll listen with story after story, each more absurd than the last. The highlight is the film's first major storytelling sequence, a flashback that involves Munchausen and his band of misfits trying to win a bet -- and doing so in amazing style. But so much of the film is so irrelevant that these feel like huge highlights lost in a sea of mediocrity and bad editing.

The Three Musketeers (1973) Review

I saw the word "whimsical" used in one product description of this installment of The Three Musketeers, a faithful adaptation of the classic novel, and no word could better describe the film. It's a combination of belly laughs via non-stop sight gags, endless swashbuckling, and only a dab of plot, all of which serve to make this an engaging event movie that takes place in France instead of in space. Packed with classic actors (including Charlton Heston, Christopher Lee, and Raquel Welch), this is a fun, nearly farcical adventure that's definitely worth a look.

The Four Musketeers Review

More of the same from Richard Lester, who made The Three Musketeers a slapstick classic. Extremely cute and nearly as much fun as the original (D'Artagnan, now a musketeer, has to save his girlfriend from the clutches of the evil Rochefort), but this isn't a story that's exactly begging for a sequel.

Gladiator Review

"Joey, do you like movies about gladiators?" Hey, who doesn't!?

The awe-inspiring trailers for Gladiator may have you dreaming of Spartacus and Ben-Hur, but you may be surprised to find this film in reality a less palatable mélange of Braveheart and Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome. This isn't altogether a bad thing, but those expecting a new Roman epic that will stand the test of time (like Spartacus and Ben-Hur) are in for some surprises.

Continue reading: Gladiator Review

Oliver! Review

1968's Best Picture winner is an epic musical familiar to all of us -- even if you haven't actually seen it. "Food, Glorious Food!"... "Consider Yourself"... these are songs that have entered into the collective consciousness of filmgoers everywhere. And there's "Please sir, I want some more," one of cinema's most famous lines of dialogue. Young Oliver (Mark Lester) is an orphan who trades his slave-like conditions in the orphanage for questionably worse, as he becomes a member of a gang of child pickpockets under the leadership of kindly old Fagin (Ron Moody, unforgettable here) and the evil Bill Sykes (Oliver Reed). He's rescued by wealthy foster parents, then captured again by the pickpockets... singing all the way. Memorable, and responsible for inspiring a cottage industry of ragamuffin musicals a la Newsies.

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The Curse Of The Werewolf Review

You know your monster movie's in trouble when the villain isn't even born until the 30 minute mark. This minor horror flick is notable for Oliver Reed's appearance as the title creature, but the adaptation of The Werewolf of Paris (which moves the action to Spain) never amounts to much, because little ever happens in the story. Our antihero starts hunting goats during full moons when he's just a kid. Later he moves on to the residents of his village. Naturally this leads to a lynch mob, but even that doesn't raise the temperature more than a few degrees.

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Gladiator Review


On the inevitable comparison scale of Roman epics, where "Spartacus" and "Ben-Hur" (both 1926 and 1959) are 10s and that debacle of a "Cleopatra" miniseries from last year is a zero, "Gladiator" is about a five. But it's a spectacularly handsome, relatively complex, and confidently directed five.

A stylish $100 million crowd-pleaser, it recreates the civilization of 180 A.D. in engrossing detail, from the huge, well-appointed sets to the CGI-rendered aerial shots of ancient Rome and the Colosseum -- which plays a pivotal role in the story.

But in addition to an assiduous production designer with carte blanche, every Roman epic needs an imposing, broad-shouldered hero. Therefore, enter Russell Crowe as a betrayed imperial general, sold into slavery as a gladiator, who fights his way back to Rome to avenge himself upon the devious new emperor that double-crossed him and murdered his family.

Continue reading: Gladiator Review

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